Olujimi A. Ajijola, MD, PhD Neurocardiology Research Center of Excellence Cardiac Arrhythmia Center University of California, Los Angeles

Nervous System Biomarker Linked to Mortality from Heart Failure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Olujimi A. Ajijola, MD, PhD Neurocardiology Research Center of Excellence Cardiac Arrhythmia Center University of California, Los Angeles

Olujimi A. Ajijola, MD, PhD

Olujimi A. Ajijola, MD, PhD
Neurocardiology Research Center of Excellence
Cardiac Arrhythmia Center
University of California, Los Angeles

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: It hadn’t been understood why some people with basic heart failure might live longer than others despite receiving the same medications and medical device therapy. Through this research we set out to determine whether a biomarker of the nervous system could help explain the difference. This study revealed a biomarker that can specifically predict which patients with “stable” heart failure have a higher risk of dying within one to three years.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: The research shows that patients who have higher levels of neuropeptide Y, a molecule released by the nervous system, are 10 times more likely to die within one to three years than those with lower levels of neuropeptides. This is the first biomarker that has been identified to specifically predict this level of risk for people with stable heart failure. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The results could give clinicians a way to distinguish very-high-risk patients with stable heart failure from others with low to moderate risk, which could inform which patients might require more aggressive and targeted therapies.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Further studies could help determine whether a patient’s risk for death can be ascertained through less invasive measures, such as a simple blood draw, and whether early aggressive intervention in these people could reduce their risk of death. Additionally, it is yet to be determined whether the actions of the neuropeptide actually contribute to worsening heart function.

Dr. Ajijola reports no disclosures. 

Citation:

Ajijola OA, Chatterjee NA, Gonzales MJ, et al. Coronary Sinus Neuropeptide Y Levels and Adverse Outcomes in Patients With Stable Chronic Heart Failure. JAMA Cardiol. Published online December 26, 2019. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/jamacardio.2019.4717

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Last Modified: Jan 9, 2020 @ 4:07 pm

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