Regular Use of Some NSAIDs May Increase Adverse Cardiovascular Events.

Anthony Bavry, MD MPH Interventional Cardiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32610MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Anthony Bavry, MD MPH
Interventional Cardiology, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System
Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?
Dr. Bavry:
1) Among post-menopausal women, the regular use of NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke.
2) Cardiovascular risk was observed among users of celecoxib, naproxen, but not ibuprofen.

Medical Research: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. Bavry: The finding of naproxen being associated with risk was consistent with our initial study hypothesis. This finding may be unexpected to many readers. We hypothesized that naproxen would be associated with harm because this agent is a non-selective NSAID with more cox-2 than cox-1 inhibition.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Bavry: Regular use of NSAIDs (celecoxib and naproxen) can increase adverse cardiovascular events.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Bavry: Future studies are needed to define risks of NSAIDs in men and the role of dose and duration in determining adverse cardiovascular risk of these agents.

Citation:
Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Women: Results From the Women’s Health Initiative Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2014;CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000800published online before print July 8 2014,