Caffeine May Slow Progression of Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis C

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sikarin Upala MD, MS, LLB Internal Medicine, Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cooperstown, New York Preventive and Social Medicine Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

Dr. Sikarin Upala

Sikarin Upala MD, MS, LLB
Internal Medicine, Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cooperstown, New York
Preventive and Social Medicine
Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Upala: Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is the most common cause of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis as well as the most common cause of liver transplantation in the United States. As caffeine has been found to be related to decreased liver enzymes, chronic liver disease,cirrhosis, and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in several liver disease pathologies. There is inconclusive findings on the effect of caffeine on hepatitis C infected patients. Thus, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the effect of caffeine consumption in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

We found that caffeine consumers have a 61% reduced risk of developing advanced hepatic fibrosis, which is one of the consequence of chronic hepatitis C. Our meta-analysis result is in the same way with other studies who found that coffee consumption could prevent the development of hepatic fibrosis in patients with liver disease. However, we cannot conclude about the effect of caffeine on HCV viral load as there is not enough information.


MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Dr. Upala: We identified significant hepatoprotective effects of coffee consumption on hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic HCV infection. Coffee consumption seems to be an attractive lifestyle for chronic HCV patients. However, this study is based on the evidences of observational studies, it is difficult to determine whether it is occasional the associations of coffee consumption and hepatic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Upala: We think there should be a randomized controlled trial assessing the optimal dose, form of caffeinated beverage and additional benefit of this substance to standard antiviral regimen in chronic HCV patients.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: Abstract Presented at May 2016 Digestive Disease Conferenc

Caffeine is Associated with Decreased Risk of Advanced Hepatic Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Author Block: Sikarin Upala3,4, Anawin Sanguankeo3,4, Suthinee Jaruvongvanich1, Veeravich Jaruvongvanich1,2
1 Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Thailand; 2 Internal Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States; 3 Internal Medicine, Bassett Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Cooperstown, New York, United States; 4 Preventive and Social Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

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