Ben Roediger PhD Head of the Skin Inflammation Group within Professor Wolfgang Weninger’s Immune Imaging Laboratory Centenary Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown,, Australia

An Atypical Parvovirus Linked to Chronic Kidney Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ben Roediger PhD Head of the Skin Inflammation Group within Professor Wolfgang Weninger’s Immune Imaging Laboratory Centenary Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney,  Camperdown,, Australia

Dr. Roediger

Ben Roediger PhD
Head of the Skin Inflammation Group within
Professor Wolfgang Weninger’s Immune Imaging Laboratory
Centenary Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Health,
The University of Sydney,
Camperdown,, Australia

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: We use several strains of mice for our research, including animals with immunodeficiencies. One of our lines started succumbing to kidney disease and we decided to investigate.

MedicalResearch.com: Where is the MKPV virus found in nature?

Response: This remains unclear. Almost certainly in wild mice in the US, and probably mice in other countries. Whether the virus infects other species remains unknown.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

  • MKPV is a causative agent in inclusion body nephropathy, a kidney disease of mice.
  • MKPV propagates in kidney epithelial cells and causes chronic kidney disease and fibrosis.
  • MKPV infection is controlled by the adaptive immune system (i.e. T cell and B cells).
  • MKPV- induced nephropathy shares many clinico-pathological features with polyomavirus-associated nephropathy, a significant issue in kidney transplant recipients. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: We have described a natural infection system that can provide new insight into the mechanisms of chronic kidney disease and virus-induced fibrosis. Virus-associated fibrosis (‘scarring’) is well recognised in people. HCV (hepatitis C virus) and liver cirrhosis, for example. However, there are very few models of chronic viral infection in mice and as a result of this we understand very little about how they trigger the fibrotic response. By studying MKPV infection, we hope to provide insight the host response to chronic infection that we expect will be relevant for many diseases, not just in the kidney.

Disclosure: B.Roediger. and W. Weninger are co-inventors on an international patent application related to the detection and use of MKPV in research and commercial applications.

Citation:

An Atypical Parvovirus Drives Chronic Tubulointerstitial Nephropathy and Kidney Fibrosis

Available online 13 September 2018Source: CellAuthor(s): Ben Roediger, Quintin Lee, Shweta Tikoo, Joanna C.A. Cobbin, James M. Henderson, Mika Jormakka, Matthew B. O’Rourke, Matthew P. Padula, Natalia Pinello, Marisa Henry, Maria Wynne, Sara F. Santagostino, Cory F. Brayton, Lorna Rasmussen, Leszek Lisowski, Szun S. Tay, David C. Harris, John F. Bertram, John P. Dowling, Patrick BertolinoSummary
Cell – September 14, 2018 

Sep 18, 2018 @ 2:59 pm 

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