Antibiotic Impregnated Catheters Can Reduce Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection

Stephanie Bonne, MD, FACS Assistant Professor Trauma, Acute, and Critical Care Surgery Washington University in St. LouisMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Stephanie Bonne, MD, FACS
Assistant Professor
Trauma, Acute, and Critical Care Surgery
Washington University in St. Louis

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We had previously implemented education programs in our ICU in an attempt to decrease our Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI) rate.  We were, however, unable to come to zero.  We were looking for innovative ways to lower our CLABSI rate, and the use of Clorhexidine/Silver Sulfadiazine catheters was unable to move our CLABSI rate.  We decided to try Minocycline/Rifampin catheters, and monitor our Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection rate.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: The use of Minocycline/Rifampin impregnated catheters can lower Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection rate, particularly in ICUs who have been unable to reach a Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection rate of zero with other measures.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future research could include larger scale studies of this product, as well as studying the effects of other types of antibiotic impregnated catheters, like peripherally inserted central catheters.

Citation:

Effectiveness of Minocycline/Rifampin vs Chlorhexidine/Silver Sulfadiazine-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters in Preventing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection in a High-Volume Academic Intensive Care Unit: A Before-and-After Trial

Stephanie Bonne, MD, FACS John E. Mazuski, MD, PhD, FACS, Carie Sona, RN Marilyn Schallom, RN Walter Boyle, MD Timothy G. Buchman, PhD, MD, FACS Grant V. Bochicchio, MD, MPH, FACS, Craig M. Coopersmith, MD, FACS Douglas J.E. Schuerer, MD, FACS

Journal of the American College of Surgeons

Available online 27 May 2015

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MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Stephanie Bonne, MD, FACS Assistant Professor, Trauma, Acute, and Critical Care Surgery,  Washington University in St. Louis (2015). Antibiotic Impregnated Catheters Can Reduce Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection