Topical Mupirocin Changes Sinus Microbiome

Tara F Carr, MD Assistant Professor, Medicine and Otolaryngology Allergy and Immunology Fellowship Training Program Director Director, Adult Allergy Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85724

Dr. Carr

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tara F Carr, MD
Assistant Professor, Medicine and Otolaryngology
Allergy and Immunology Fellowship Training Program Director
Director, Adult Allergy
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85724

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Carr: Some patients with chronic rhinosinusitis continue to suffer from symptoms despite aggressive medical and surgical treatments. For these individuals, therapy is generally chosen based on bacterial culture results, and often includes the use of topical antibacterial rinses with a medication called mupirocin. We found that if patients are still having problems after this treatment, the bacteria identified from repeated sinus cultures are very different than those usually expected, and in general more difficult to treat.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Carr: Objective data, such as sinus culturing, is an important tool for patients refractory to standard therapies. Further, complete eradication of the sinus microbiome may cause unanticipated complications for patients.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Carr: We support ongoing efforts to identify alternative treatments for symptomatic sinusitis and to study the contribution of the healthy host microbiome and immune dysfunction in refractory sinusitis.

Citation:

Tara F Carr, MD (2015). Topical Mupirocin Changes Sinus Microbiome

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