Sepsis Linked To High Rate of Hospital Readmissions

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sachin Yende, M.D., M.S., Associate professor University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine’s departments of Critical Care Medicine and Clinical and Translational and Vice president of Critical Care at the VA Pittsburgh.

Dr. Yende

Sachin Yende, M.D., M.S., Associate professor
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine’s departments of
Critical Care Medicine and Clinical and Translational and
Vice president of Critical Care at the VA Pittsburgh.

Florian B. Mayr, M.D., M.P.H. Faculty member in University of Pittsburgh Department of Critical Care Medicine and the Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion

Dr. Mayr

Florian B. Mayr, M.D., M.P.H.
Faculty member in University of Pittsburgh
Department of Critical Care Medicine and the
Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Veteran Health Administration currently track readmission rates for pneumonia, acute heart attacks, heart failure and chronic obstructive lung disease for quality purposes and pay for performance. In our study, we were able to demonstrate that unplanned readmissions after sepsis (defined as life threatening organ failure due to the body’s response to an overwhelming infection) are more common than readmission for these other conditions stated above and associated with significant excess costs.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Sepsis is very common and unfortunately its sequelae continue after hospital discharge. While this report focused on readmissions in the immediate post discharge period, other studies have shown that the effects of sepsis hospitalization continue for several years.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future research is needed to develop more personalized interventions to reduce readmission after sepsis. For this to happen we need to have a better understanding of a patient’s likelihood to be readmitted and the reasons for readmission. Many of these patients are still recovering at home and in nursing homes and rehabilitation facilities, often too weak to return to the clinic to see their primary care physician. Therefore, future research should focus on developing new models to provide care for these patients.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Mayr FB, Talisa VB, Balakumar V, Chang CH, Fine M, Yende S. Proportion and Cost of Unplanned 30-Day Readmissions After Sepsis Compared With Other Medical Conditions. JAMA. Published online January 22, 2017. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.20468

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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