Ulrik Stenz Justesen, MD, DMSc Senior consultant at Department of Clinical Microbiology Odense University Hospital Denmark

Sepsis With Anaerobic Bacteria Linked to Increased Colon Cancer Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ulrik Stenz Justesen, MD, DMSc Senior consultant at Department of Clinical Microbiology Odense University Hospital Denmark

Dr. Stenz Justesen

Ulrik Stenz Justesen, MD, DMSc
Senior consultant at Department of Clinical Microbiology
Odense University Hospital
Denmark 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not require oxygen for energy production, and live in various environments including the human gut, where they usually do not cause infections directly. Previous studies have reported an association between bacteria from the Bovis group streptococci, Clostridium septicum and colorectal cancer (CRC). Recently associations between different Bacteroides species., Fusobacterium nucleatum and CRC have also been reported. We aimed to investigate this further in a large-scale study. 

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Clostridium septicum infection was associated with a 42 times increased risk of colorectal cancer within 1 year (0.5% of controls developing CRC versus 20.8% in C. septicum), and a 22-times risk overall (1.1% controls versus 22.6%). Bacteroides ovatus was linked to a 13 times increased risk of CRC within 1 year (0.5% of controls versus 6.7% B. ovatus), and a 6-times increased risk overall (1.1% controls versus 6.7%).

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: In this large scale cohort study, it was found that in patients with blood infections caused by selected anaerobic bacteria the risk of incident colorectal cancer was increased up to 42 times compared with patients with bacteraemia caused by aerobic bacteria such as E.coli or S. aureus or negative controls. The discovery of blood infections with certain anaerobic bacteria could potentially result in a recommendation of further evaluation for colorectal cancer in selected patients. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Our follow up research of this study will focus on the specific bacteria from cancer patients to see if we can identify specific characteristics that could be implicated in cancer development. If this is the case it could be of great importance when it comes to screening and treatment of colorectal cancer.

No disclosures. 

Citation: ECCMID 2020 abstract

https://www.eccmid.org/

European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) Abtract 

Bacteraemia with anaerobic bacteria and association with colorectal cancer 

Ulrik Stenz Justesen, Stig Lønberg Nielsen, Thøger Gorm Jensen, Ram B. Dessau, Jens Kjølseth Møller, John E. Coia, Steen Lomborg Andersen, Court Pedersen, Kim Oren Gradel

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May 8, 2020 @ 11:27 am

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