Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Endometrial Cancer

Maki Inoue-Choi, PhD, MS, RD Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, NIH Rockville, MD 20850 MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Maki Inoue-Choi, PhD, MS, RD
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, NIH
Rockville, MD 20850

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: In our study, postmenopausal women who reported higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages were more likely to develop estrogen-dependent type I endometrial cancer, the most common type of this cancer.

MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Answer: Although we are the first to show this association, it is not surprising that women who drank more sugar-sweetened beverages had higher risk of type I endometrial cancer but not estrogen-independent type II endometrial cancer. Other studies have shown that the increasing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has paralleled the increase in obesity. Obese women are likely to have higher circulating levels of estrogens and insulin, which are known risk factors for type I endometrial cancer.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Answer: Although our study findings are interesting, we are the first to show the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and the risk of endometrial cancer. Because ours is an observational study, it is not possible to establish a causal link between sugar-sweetened beverages and endometrial cancer. Therefore, our findings need to be replicated. Individuals should follow current dietary guidelines to avoid sugar-sweetened beverages. Too much added sugar from any source can elevate person’s overall calorie intake and may increase the risk of a number of health conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease as well as cancer.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Answer: Because this study is the first to show the association between high sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and endometrial cancer, such findings may be due to chance and need replication in other studies.

Citation:

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Nov 22.

Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and the Risk of Type I and Type II Endometrial Cancer among Postmenopausal Women.

Inoue-Choi M, Robien K, Mariani A, Cerhan JR, Anderson KE.

Authors’ Affiliations: Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota; Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine; Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota; and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, November 2013