Paper and Digital SAGE Brain Tests Equally Identify Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Douglas W. Scharre MD Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry Director Division of Cognitive Neurology, Department of Neurology  Director, Center for Cognitive and Memory Disorders Director, Memory Disorders Research Center Co-Director, Neuroscience Research Institute Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center  Columbus, OH

Dr. Douglas Scharre

Douglas W. Scharre MD
Professor of Clinical Neurology and Psychiatry Director, Division of Cognitive Neurology
Department of Neurology
Director, Center for Cognitive and Memory Disorders
Director, Memory Disorders Research Center
Co-Director, Neuroscience Research Institute
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Columbus, OH

 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination (SAGE) is a pen-and paper, valid and reliable cognitive assessment tool for identifying individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or early dementia. We published age and education normative data on SAGE and determined that one point be added to the scores when age over 79 and one point be added when education level is 12 years or less. We evaluated the identical test questions in digital format (eSAGE) made for tablet use, adjusted with previously published age and education norms, and determined eSAGE’s association with gold standard clinical assessments. eSAGE is commercially known as BrainTest.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Subjects were classified as either dementia (n=21), mild cognitive impairment  (n=24), or normal (n=21) based on standard clinical criteria and neuropsychological testing. ROC of eSAGE based on clinical diagnosis in detecting cognitive impairment from normal subjects showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.89. An eSAGE score of 15 or less provided 69% sensitivity and 100% specificity in detecting cognitive impairment (MCI and dementia, n=45) from normal subjects (n=21). eSAGE ROC analysis of normal vs. MCI subjects showed AUC of 0.80. An eSAGE score of 17 or less provided 75% sensitivity and 76% specificity in detecting MCI subjects.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Tablet-based eSAGE shows strong association with validated SAGE and with neuropsychological batteries, MoCA, and MMSE. MCI subjects typically fall in the 15-17 range using adjusted scores. Both eSAGE and SAGE have the advantage of self-administration,brevity, four interchangeable forms, high sensitivity and specificity in detecting cognitive impairment from normal subjects, and potential widespread availability to be a major factor in overcoming the many obstacles in identifying early cognitive changes in individuals. This self-administered test would ease the time burden of physicians who desire to incorporate a validated screening evaluation in their clinic setting.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Using this self-administred cognitive assessment tool, a trial should be done to try to demonstrate a correlation between performing cognitive screening/case finding and improved outcomes for patients.

Financial Disclosure: BrainTest, Inc. provided financial support for this study; https://braintest.com

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: Abstract presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference | July 16-20, 2017, London, England

http://www.alz.org/aaic/pressroom.asp#contacts

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

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