Pediatric Anxiety Disorders: Treatment Follow Up Course

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Golda Ginsburg, Ph.D Professor Director, Research, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Baltimore, Maryland Golda Ginsburg, Ph.D
Professor Director, Research,
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr Ginsburg: This study examined the long-term outcomes of youth treated for an anxiety disorders. Findings revealed that almost half of anxious youth treated for an anxiety disorder were in remission (i.e., did not meet diagnostic criteria for any of the three study entry anxiety disorders) at an average of six years since starting treatment. Youth showing clinically meaningful improvement after 12 weeks of treatment, were more likely to be in remission, had lower anxiety severity, and had better functioning compared to youth who showed minimal or no initial clinical improvement.

Treatment type did not affect long-term outcomes.

MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr Ginsburg: A lower percent of youth maintained their initial treatment gains than expected, suggesting a need for additional monitoring and relapse prevention.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr Ginsburg:

  • Initial positive response to an evidenced-based treatment increases the probability for remission.
  • Continued monitoring and regular “check- ups” are warranted even for youth who show an initial treatment response.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr Ginsburg:

  • Identify additional variables that predict who will relapse
  • Identify relapse prevention strategies to prevention relapse

Citation:

Ginsburg GS, Becker EM, Keeton CP, et al. Naturalistic Follow-up of Youths Treated for Pediatric Anxiety Disorders. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;():. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.4186