Non-Invasive Interface Allows Subjects To Control Objects With Just Thoughts

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Bin He, Ph.D. Director, Institute for Engineering in Medicine Director, Center for Neuroengineering Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Biomedical Engineering Medtronic-Bakken Endowed Chair for Engineering in Medicine University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455

Dr. Bin He

Bin He, Ph.D.
Director, Institute for Engineering in Medicine
Director, Center for Neuroengineering
Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Medtronic-Bakken Endowed Chair for Engineering in Medicine
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This work is aimed at developing a noninvasive brains-computer interface to allow disabled patients to control their environment by just thinking about it.

We found 8 human subjects were able to accomplish 3D reach and grasp tasks without using any muscle activities but just thinking about it.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response:  That noninvasive brain-computer interface may some day become a way for disabled patient to control a prosthetic limb or other devices without the need of brain implant.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Noninvasive Electroencephalogram Based Control of a Robotic Arm for Reach and Grasp Tasks

Jianjun Meng,  Shuying Zhang, Angeliki Bekyo, Jaron Olsoe, Bryan Baxter & Bin He
Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 38565 (2016)
doi:10.1038/srep38565

Published online:14 December 2016

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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