Persistent Postpartum Pain Linked To Higher Risk of Depression

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
MS WEI DU, First author
Third Year Medical Student
DUKE-NUS Medical School and
DR BAN LEONG SNG, Senior Author
Senior Consultant Department of Women’s Anesthesia KK
Women’s and Children’s Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

MS WEI DU: We performed a cohort study involving 200 healthy women who received epidural pain relief during the deliveries of their firstborns to investigate the relationship between persistent childbirth pain, psychological and pain vulnerability with postnatal depression. Postnatal depression was evaluated using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Score (EPDS).

Patients with persistent pain (>4 weeks postpartum) had significantly higher EPDS scores as compared to patients whose pain resolved by 4 weeks by a difference of 2.44 mean score, and compared to patients who never had pain postpartum by a difference of 4.07 mean score. Other significant factors that were associated with higher EDPS score included higher levels of stress, greater pain vulnerability during the intrapartum period and higher anxiety level at 6 to 8 weeks postpartum.

DR BAN LEONG SNG: Patients with persistent pain (>4 weeks postpartum) had significantly higher EPDS scores as compared to patients whose pain resolved by 4 weeks by a difference of 2.44 mean score, and compared to patients who never had pain postpartum by a difference of 4.07 mean score. Other significant factors that were associated with higher EDPS score included higher levels of stress, greater pain vulnerability during the intrapartum period and higher anxiety level at 6 to 8 weeks postpartum.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

MS WEI DU: We concluded that greater pain vulnerability and stress during intrapartum period, and presence of persistent pain or higher anxiety during postpartum period are positively associated with higher scores on postnatal depression tests.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

DR BAN LEONG SNG: The research findings support the need to address pain comprehensively to lessen the risk of developing postnatal depression. We are currently conducting a larger study to evaluate the impact of pain and postnatal depression in pregnant women.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

DR BAN LEONG SNG: Postnatal evaluation and management of childbirth pain and postnatal depression is important in our care of mothers and their newborns.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

World Congress of Anaesthesiologists abstract discussing:

Persistent childbirth pain increases risk of postnatal depression

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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