Elizabeth D. Kantor, PhD MPH Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center NY, NY

Adolescent Inflammation Associated with Premature Mortality

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Elizabeth D. Kantor, PhD MPH Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center NY, NY

Dr. Elizabeth D. Kantor

Elizabeth D. Kantor, PhD MPH
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
NY, NY

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: There has been recent interest in understanding how exposures in childhood and adolescence relate to later-life health outcomes.

Although inflammation is thought to play a role in the etiology of various diseases, little is known about the long-term implications of inflammation in early life. We therefore sought to evaluate how erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), a marker of inflammation, measured among ostensibly healthy men in late adolescence, relates to subsequent cause-specific mortality.

We found that men with high inflammation in late adolescence experienced increased mortality due to cancer and cardiovascular disease.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings? 

Response: Here, we observed that high inflammation in late adolescence was associated with increased premature mortality due to cancer and cardiovascular disease. As this study was conducted among ostensibly healthy men, our results suggest that this marker of inflammation is capturing something beyond health conditions manifested in adolescence.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Of course, this is an observational study and there are limitations to consider, but these results are definitely interesting and suggest a need for further research to understand the role of early life inflammation in later-life outcomes.

Citation:

 

Kantor ED, Udumyan R, Giovannucci EL, et al. Association of Blood Marker of Inflammation in Late Adolescence With Premature Mortality. JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 03, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.2835

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Last Modified: Sep 9, 2019 @ 6:09 pm

 

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