Maternal Obesity Increases Congenital Kidney/Urinary Anomalies in Offspring

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ian R. Macumber MD
Pediatric Nephrology, Seattle Children’s Hospital
Seattle, Washington

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Macumber: The main finding is that there is a strong association between maternal obesity and odds of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) in offspring.  This relationship remains strong when looking at offspring with renal malformation (excluding non-renal congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract), or in offspring with isolated congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (no congenital anomalies elsewhere in the body).  There is a dose-response relationship to this association, with the offspring of extremely obese mothers have even higher odds of having congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

Medical Research: What was most surprising about the results?

Dr. Macumber: There were no significant effect modifiers.  The association between maternal obesity and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract was not affected by maternal diabetes status, maternal age or race, maternal smoking status, socioeconomic status, or paternal age or race.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Macumber: This research further adds to the public health importance of obesity, especially as potentially modifiable risk factor.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Macumber: Further studies will need to be conducted to discover the mechanism behind the association between maternal obesity and offspring congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

Citation:

ASN 2014 abstract:

The Association of Maternal Obesity with Infant Congenital Abnormalities of the Kidney and Urinary Tract in Washington State