Parenting Educational Intervention Can Reduce Childhood Obesity

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ian M. Paul, M.D., M.Sc. Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health Sciences Chief, Division of Academic General Pediatrics Vice Chair of Faculty Affairs, Department of Pediatrics Penn State College of Medicine Hershey, PA 17033-0850

Prof. Paul

Ian M. Paul, M.D., M.Sc.
Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health Sciences
Chief, Division of Academic General Pediatrics
Vice Chair of Faculty Affairs, Department of Pediatrics
Penn State College of Medicine
Hershey, PA 17033-0850

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: 20-25% of 2-5 year old children are overweight or obese in the US, and these children have increased risk of remaining overweight across the lifecourse. To date, research efforts aimed at preventing early life overweight have had very limited success.

In our randomized clinical trial that included 279 mother-child dyads, a responsive parenting intervention that began shortly after birth significantly reduced body mass index z-score compared with controls at age 3 years.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Parents can be equipped with strategies that promote healthy weight for their children during their child’s first years. These strategies may have a long-term impact on their child’s health. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: Testing the intervention in higher-risk groups and in more diverse settings. We also aim to follow the children for a longer period of time (currently funded to follow them until age 9). 

Citation: 

Paul IM, Savage JS, Anzman-Frasca S, et al. Effect of a Responsive Parenting Educational Intervention on Childhood Weight Outcomes at 3 Years of AgeThe INSIGHT Randomized Clinical TrialJAMA.2018;320(5):461–468. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.9432

Aug 9, 2018 @ 12:16 pm

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One thought on “Parenting Educational Intervention Can Reduce Childhood Obesity

  1. This study is the need of the hour. So many parents gauge their success as parents on their ability to make their child “finish” everything on the plate. Force feeding by threatening or bribing is the norm in many families. And feeding by distracting children with devices is another prevalent practice in today’s world. All this is resulting in a generation that is unaware of hunger or satiety – because they have never experienced either – resulting in obesity. The findings of this study will help parents understand where they are going wrong and what they should do instead. Looking forward to sharing this with the parents I consult with.

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