Reesa Monir, MD Dr. Monir is a PGY-3 dermatology resident at the University of Florida. She plans to pursue a career in pediatric dermatology. 

Race and Atopic Dermatitis During Early Childhood

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Jennifer Schoch

Dr. Schoch

Jennifer Schoch, MD
Dr. Schoch is a pediatric dermatologist and
Associate Professor of Dermatology at the University of Florida.
Her research focuses on the infantile skin microbiome and its role in pediatric skin disease.
She is a member of the Society for Pediatric Dermatology. 

Reesa Monir, MD Dr. Monir is a PGY-3 dermatology resident at the University of Florida. She plans to pursue a career in pediatric dermatology. 

Dr. Monir

 

Reesa Monir, MD
Dr. Monir is a PGY-3 dermatology resident at the University of Florida.
She plans to pursue a career in pediatric dermatology.

 

 

 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Atopic dermatitis is a common pediatric skin condition that often begins during infancy. Kids and families alike suffer from the itching and demanding care required to manage this condition. While existing studies have examined the impact of race on atopic dermatitis from birth to adulthood, few studies have examined the early childhood period specifically.

As this time is the peak period for diagnosis, we sought to examine the impact of race on disease prevalence during early childhood. 

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Black infants/ children had the highest rates of eczema, followed by Asian and Hispanic infants/children.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report? 

Response: Race itself is significantly associated with the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis during early childhood, independent of mediating factors like insurance type and gestational age.
 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Our study identified factors unrelated to the link between race and eczema, but future studies are needed to better define the underlying cause of these disparities. We recommend that future studies focus on the early childhood period with the hope of one day preventing the disease. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: We would like to thank Drs. Dominick Lemas and Cynthia Garvan for their collaboration on this project.

Citation:

“Association Between Atopic Dermatitis and Race During Early Childhood” presented at the virtual Society for Pediatric Dermatology 45th Annual Meeting.

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Jul 25, 2020 @ 1:44 pm

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