Steep Increase in Adversity-Related Hospital Admissions for Teenage Girls

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Ruth Blackburn PhD  UKRI Innovation Fellow UCL Institute of Health Informatics

Dr Ruth Blackburn PhD 
UKRI Innovation Fellow
UCL Institute of Health Informatics 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In England one child in every classroom is admitted to hospital with an adversity related injury (i.e. violence, intentional self-injury, or drug or alcohol misuse) between the ages of 10 and 19 years. These young people are more likely than their classmates to be re-admitted to hospital or to die within 10 years.

We investigated how the rate of hospital admissions with an adversity related injury has changed over time among young people aged 10-24 years, using administrative data for National Health Service hospitals in England.

We found that between 2012 and 2016, rates of admission with an adversity related injury (including intentional self-injury) increased steeply for girls, with the biggest increase (6% per year) among 15-19 year olds. During the same time period, rates of admission with an adversity related injury decreased in boys aged 15-24 years (4-5% per year) but increased slightly for 10-14 year olds (3% per year). 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our study suggests that adversity related injury resulting in hospital admission is an increasing in 15-19 year old girls. However, it is unclear from our study what is causing this increase.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Future research should investigate how schools, family and local services including healthcare can help prevent adversity related injuries in young people. 

We have no conflicts of interest 

Citation:

Blackburn RM, Herbert A, Wijlaars L, Gilbert R. Trends in Hospital Admissions for Nonfatal Adversity-Related Injury Among Youths in England, 2002-2016. JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 17, 2018. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.2516

Sep 18, 2018 @ 2:18 pm

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