Young Adults Who Eat Lots Fruits & Vegetables Lower Risk Of Coronary Artery Calcium

Michael D. Miedema, MD, MPH Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Abbott Northwestern Hospital Minneapolis, MN

Dr. Michael Miedema

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Michael DMiedema, MD, MPH
Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation
Abbott Northwestern Hospital
Minneapolis, MN

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Miedema: A healthy diet is an essential component in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. A dietary pattern high in fruits and vegetables has been associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular disease outcomes in multiple observation cohorts of middle-aged and older adults. However, the cardiovascular impact of fruit and vegetable intake in younger adults is less clear.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Miedema: To evaluate this relationship, we studied 2,506 young adults in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study to determine the association between fruit and vegetable intake during young adulthood and subsequent development of coronary artery calcium 20 years later. After adjusting for age, gender, and lifestyle variables, including smoking and physical activity, we found an inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable and subsequent coronary artery calcium across tertiles of fruit and vegetable intake (p-value <0.001). Individuals in the top third of fruit and vegetable intake at baseline had 26% lower odds of developing calcified plaque 20 years later. This inverse linear relationship remained significant after adjusting for fruit and vegetable intake at year 20 as well as after adjustment for other dietary variables such as dairy, nuts, fish, salt, and refined grains.

Fruits Vegetables CDC PHIL ImageMedical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Miedema: Our results reinforce the importance of establishing a healthy dietary pattern early in adulthood, and provide further credence for public health initiatives aimed at increasing fruits and vegetables intake in adolescents and young adults.

Citation:

 

The Association of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption During Early Adulthood With the Prevalence of Coronary Artery Calcium After 20 Years of Follow-Up: The CARDIA Study

Michael D. Miedema, Andrew Petrone, James M. Shikany, Philip GreenlandCora E. Lewis, Mark J. Pletcher, J. Michael Gaziano, and Luc Djousse

Circulation. 2015;CIRCULATIONAHA.114.012562published online before print October 26 2015, doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.012562

[wysija_form id=”5″]

 

Michael D. Miedema, MD, MPH (2015). Young Adults Who Eat Lots Fruits & Vegetables Lower Risk Of Coronary Artery Calcium 

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.