Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Blocked By IM Lidocaine

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Roland Staud, M.D. Professor of Medicine University of Florida Gainesville, FL 

Dr. Staud

Roland Staud, M.D.
Professor of Medicine
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Fatigue after exertion or sleep loss is normal. However, fatigue at rest is not. Resting fatigue is reported by cancer, heart disease, RA, SLE patients and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). CFS has been mostly associated with chronic infections but findings are inconsistent. We hypothesized that chronic fatigue is signaled by sensitized tissue receptors to the CNS where minute amounts of muscle metabolites can activate these receptors (metabo-receptors). Why the receptors are sensitized is unclear. To test our hypothesis we injected CFS patients with lidocaine or normal saline into muscles once. We saw a statistical improvement of overall fatigue (27%) with lidocaine compared to saline.

Conclusion: Chronic fatigue syndrome patients are using metabo-receptors for inappropriately signaling fatigue to the CNS.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Chronic fatigue syndrome is associated with sensitized metabo-receptors in muscle tissues. Interventions that reduce sensitivity or block transmission of receptor signals to the CNS may help fatigue in Chronic fatigue syndrome and other fatiguing illnesses like cancer.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We want to obtain proof that metabo-receptors play the same role in cancer, heart disease, etc. 

This research was funded by the NIH

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Muscle injections with lidocaine improve resting fatigue and pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Roland Staud,1 Taylor Kizer,1 Michael E Robinson2

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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