Continent of Birth Linked To Healthy Sleep Duration

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Valerie Newsome, PhD, Postdoctoral fellow Department of Population Health, Division of Health and Behavior NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Valerie Newsome

Valerie Newsome, PhD, Postdoctoral fellow
Department of Population Health, Division of Health and Behavior
NYU Langone Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Although sleep duration has been related to a number of negative health outcomes, few studies have examined the relationship between place of birth and sleep duration. We examined data for 416,152 adult participants living in the United States between 2000-2013 who responded to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); associations were explored between healthy sleep duration (7-8hrs.), references to unhealthy sleep duration (8 hrs.) and place of birth.

After adjusting for socio-demographic factors, health risks, and physician-diagnosed medical conditions, multivariate logistic regression revealed that respondents born in the Indian subcontinent were more likely to report healthy sleep duration, compared with US-born respondents (OR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.57-2.20, p < 0.001), while individuals born on the continent of Africa were least likely to report healthy sleep duration (OR= 0. 86, 95% CI: 0.73-1.02, p< 0.001). We also noted a trend suggesting that the longer immigrants reside in the U.S., the greater their likelihood to experience unhealthy sleep.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: There may be biological, ecological, and psychosocial explanations for increased odds of healthy sleep duration based on an individual’s place of birth. Researchers tend to frame relationships between ethnicity and health through a deficit model. Our findings present an opportunity to learn more about those psychosocial factors associated with ethnicity and immigration status that may be protective in the United States with respect to sleep.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: These findings add to the literature on sleep duration among racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S. There are potential lessons to be learned from immigrants who are more likely to experience healthy sleep, even while dealing with the effects of acculturation and discrimination, both of which have been found to impact sleep duration negatively. This study suggests that place of birth should be considered in the assessment of risk factors for unhealthy sleep.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

SLEEP 2016 abstract:

Place of Birth and Healthy Sleep Duration: Analysis of the National Health Interview Survey (2000-2013)
Valerie Newsome, PhD, et al

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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