Daytime Naps May Raise Your Blood Pressure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Wisit Cheungpasitporn, MD, Nephrology Fellow Project mentor: Stephen B. Erickson, MD Departments of Nephrology and Hypertension Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Dr. Wisit Cheungpasitporn

Wisit Cheungpasitporn, MD, Nephrology Fellow
Project mentor: Stephen B. Erickson, MD
Departments of Nephrology and Hypertension
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Cheungpasitporn: The prevention and management of hypertension continue to be major public health challenges. Studies have shown the benefits of napping, including reduction of fatigue and improvement of alertness, mood and work performance. However, there have also been increasing reported associations between napping and cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, strokes, and higher mortality from all causes. The risk of hypertension in adults who regularly take a nap is controversial.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Dr. Cheungpasitporn: Our meta-analysis demonstrated a significant association between daytime napping and hypertension, greater than 30 to 60 minutes per day with an overall 1.17 -fold increased risk of hypertension.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Cheungpasitporn: Sleep-wake regulation and circadian processes have impacts on various physiological functions and metabolic hormones. This finding may impact the prevention and clinical management of hypertension.

Future study is required to evaluate the potential benefits of hypertension screening for daytime nappers.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

The association between napping and hypertension: A meta-analysis

Wisit Cheungpasitporn ,Charat Thongprayoon,Narat Srivali, Priya Vijayvargiya,
Wonngarm Kittanamongkolchai,Sean M. Caples, Stephen B. Erickson
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States
Journal of the American Society Hypertension
April 2016Volume 10, Issue 4, Supplement, Page e42

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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