Obstructive Sleep Apnea More Common In Obese Adolescents With Enlarged Tonsils

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ron B. Mitchell, MD Professor and Vice Chairman, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery William Beckner Distinguished Chair in Otolaryngology Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology UT Southwestern and Children's Medical Center Dallas Dallas, TX 75207

Dr. Ron Mitchell

Ron B. Mitchell, MD
Professor and Vice Chairman,
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery
William Beckner Distinguished Chair in Otolaryngology
Chief of Pediatric Otolaryngology
UT Southwestern and Children’s Medical Center Dallas
Dallas, TX 75207

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) has not been widely studies in adolescents. This is one of a few studies that was targeted at 12-17 year olds who were referred for a sleep study for possible OSA. The study included 224 adolescents (53% male). aged 12 to 17 years. The mean BMI was 33.4 and most were either Hispanic or African American (85.3%). A total of 148 (66.1%) were obese. Most adolescents referred for a sleep study (68%), had  Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Normal-weight adolescents were least likely to have OSA at 48%, while obese children were most likely at 77%. Severe OSA was most likely in obese males with tonsillar hypertrophy.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: A low threshold for obtaining a sleep study to screen for Obstructive Sleep Apnea is warranted in obese, male adolescents with tonsillar hypertrophy and symptoms of sleep disordered breathing.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Additional large prospective studies focusing on OSA in adolescents are needed. These should be community based and include adolescents who are asymptomatic and can act as controls.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Our study population was composed of adolescents referred to a tertiary pediatric center for suspected OSA and, as such, may not represent the general population of adolescents. In addition, adolescents with considerable comorbidities were excluded from this study and predictors of  Obstructive Sleep Apnea severity may be different if considerable comorbidities are present.

No disclosures.

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Citation:

Baker M, Scott B, Johnson RF, Mitchell RB. Predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity in Adolescents. JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. Published online February 23, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2016.4130

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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