Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Task Force Finds Insufficient Evidence To Screen All Adults

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Alex Krist, MD MPH Task Force member Associate Professor Fairfax Family Medicine Residency Co-director, Ambulatory Care Outcomes Research Network Virginia Commonwealth University

Dr. Alex Krist

Dr. Alex Krist, MD MPH
Task Force member
Associate Professor
Fairfax Family Medicine Residency
Co-director, Ambulatory Care Outcomes Research Network
Virginia Commonwealth University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been found to be associated with serious health conditions, including heart disease and diabetes. Additionally, OSA can cause excessive daytime sleepiness, which can significantly impact a person’s quality of life, increase involvement in motor vehicle crashes, and lead to an increased risk of death. Estimates show that OSA affected between 10 and 15% of the U.S. population in the 1990s, and rates may have increased over the past 20 years, so the Task Force wanted to examine the evidence on screening adults without symptoms or symptoms for obstructive sleep apnea.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: The Task Force found that the current evidence is insufficient to make a recommendation for or against screening for  obstructive sleep apnea in adults without any signs or symptoms of the condition. As a result, we are calling for more research on this important topic.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: The Task Force found one of the major research gaps is the lack of studies done in patients who had been screened for OSA in primary care, as most studies were conducted on patients in sleep clinics. Additionally, the Task Force identified a need for more evidence in identifying screening tools such as questionnaires that could be used in the primary care setting to accurately determine which patients would benefit from further evaluation and testing for OSA. Lastly, the Task Force encourages more research surrounding the effect of OSA treatment interventions on health outcomes such as mortality, heart attacks, stroke, blood pressure, motor vehicle crashes, cognitive function, and quality of life.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Anyone with concerns about their sleep or possible symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea should talk with their doctor to determine if screening is appropriate for them.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in AdultsUS Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2017;317(4):407-414. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.20325

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

No Comments

Post A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.