Algorithm Allows Patients To Calculate Their Risk of Stroke and Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Doug Manuel MD, MSc, FRCPC Professor and Senior Scientist Ottawa Hospital Research Institute | L’Institut de Recherche de l’Hôpital d’Ottawa Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa Départment de Médicine Familiale Université d’Ottawa 

Dr. Manuel

Dr. Doug Manuel MD, MSc, FRCPC
Professor and Senior Scientist
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute | L’Institut de Recherche de l’Hôpital d’Ottawa
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa
Départment de Médicine Familiale
Université d’Ottawa 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: A lot of people are interested in healthy living, but often we don’t have that discussion in the doctor’s office,” says Dr. Manuel, who is also a professor at the University of Ottawa. “Doctors will check your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, but they don’t necessarily ask about lifestyle factors that could put you at risk of a heart attack and stroke. We hope this tool can help people — and their care team — with better information about healthy living and options for reducing their risk of heart attack and stroke.”

“What sets this cardiovascular risk calculator apart is that it looks at healthy living, and it is better calibrated to the Canadian population,” says Dr. Doug Manuel, lead author, senior scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and a senior core scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).” 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Patients can estimate their risk of heart disease and stroke based on their healthy living (smoking, physical activity, diet and drinking), along with other self-reported questions.  

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Algorithms developed in this study represent the new generation of algorithms developed using big data. The first sentence from the paper, “big data” has the potential to support personalized or precision medicine through more com “.

These algorithms need to be generated for multiple diseases (in progress) and incorporated into more interactive patient-oriented tools (such as chat bots).

Citation:

Development and validation of a cardiovascular disease risk prediction model using population health surveys: the Cardiovascular Disease Population Risk Tool (CVDPoRT 

Douglas G. ManuelMeltem TunaCarol BennettDeirdre HennessyLaura RosellaClaudia SanmartinJack V. TuRichard PerezStacey Fisher and Monica Taljaard

Jul 23, 2018 @ 11:29 am

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