Stroke: Lower Cognitive Function Linked to Increase Risk, Mortality

Kumar Bharat Rajan, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Internal Medicine Section of Population Sciences Chicago IL 60612MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Kumar Bharat Rajan, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine
Section of Population Sciences
Chicago IL 60612

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the paper?

Dr. Rajan: Lower levels of cognitive functioning was associated with incident stroke and the change in cognitive functioning was increased after incident stroke. Cognitive functioning was an independent marker of mortality even after accounting for incident stroke.

Medical Research:
Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. Rajan: The strength of associations were stronger than expected.

Medical Research: What should clinicians take away from this report?

Dr. Rajan: Cognitive functioning and stroke are two important markers for mortality. A lower level of cognitive functioning can also impact stroke risk, while stroke has long-term impact on cognitive functioning. Both cognitive change and stroke increase mortality risk.

Medical Research: What recommendations for future studies do you have as a result of this work?

Dr. Rajan: First, we would like independent confirmation of our findings in both European and African American populations. Second, studies examining the underlying biological mechanisms might help us better understand the aging process.

Citation:

Association of Cognitive Functioning, Incident Stroke, and Mortality in Older AdultsKumar B. Rajan,Neelum T. Aggarwal,Robert S. Wilson,Susan A. Everson-Rose, and Denis A. Evans

Stroke. 2014;STROKEAHA.114.005143published online before print August 7 2014, doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.005143

 

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