Bariatric Surgery: Self-Reported Weight Loss Fairly Accurate

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Nicholas J. Christian, PhD
Graduate School of Public Health
University of Pittsburgh

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Christian: We found that the differences between measured and self-reported weights following bariatric surgery were small and did not systematically differ by measured body mass index or degree of postoperative weight change. The average degree of underreporting by self-report was 0.7 kg for women and 1.0 kg for men.

MedicalResearch.com: Was this finding unexpected?

Dr. Christian: Yes. General population studies have found greater under-reporting of weight among obese individuals. However, in this sample of participants who underwent bariatric surgery we found the differences between measured and self-reported weights to be small.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Christian: Self-reported weights may not unduly affect study results of surgically induced weight change and can be used when measured weights are not available.

Citation:

Validity of Self-reported Weights Following Bariatric Surgery

Christian NJ, King WC, Yanovski SZ, Courcoulas AP, Belle SH. Validity of Self-reported Weights Following Bariatric Surgery. JAMA. 2013;():-. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.281043.

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