Obese Patients Less Sensitive To Fat Leading to Overconsumption and Weight Gain

Russell Keast Ph.D., CFS Professor Centre for Advanced Sensory Science (CASS) School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health Deakin University Melbourne Burwood Campus Burwood, VIC 3125

Prof. Keast

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Russell Keast Ph.D., CFS Professor

Centre for Advanced Sensory Science (CASS)
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health
Deakin University
Melbourne Burwood Campus
Burwood, VIC 3125

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Keast: Fatty acids are detected at various stages of food consumption and digestion via interactions with nutrient receptors upon the tongue and within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This chemoreception initiates functional responses, i.e., taste perception, peptide secretion and alterations in GI motility that play a fundamental role in food consumption, hedonics and satiety. In obesity, both GI and taste detection of fatty acids is attenuated and this may predispose individuals to increased consumption of high-fat foods, or foods containing greater concentrations of fat.  In other word overweight and obese people are less sensitive to fat and this is associated with overconsumption of fatty foods leading to weight gain.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Keast: A 6 week low-fat diet results in increased ability to taste fat.  We believe this is important as what we measure in the mouth is reflective of what is happening throughout the gastrointestinal tract.  Increasing the alimentary canal response to dietary fat should ensure a stronger satiety signal when eating foods containing dietary fat.  If a person is comfortably full after consuming a meal it is less likely they will continue eating.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Keast: The next step in this research is to understand the mechanisms that link fat sensitivity with obesity. Satiety mechanisms are likely involved, but research is needed to identify pathways and develop long term sustainable weight loss strategies.

Citation:

Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Jun;36(6):834-42. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2011.155. Epub 2011 Aug 9.

Recent fat intake modulates fat taste sensitivity in lean and overweight subjects.

Stewart JE1, Keast RS.

Russell Keast Ph.D., CFS Professor (2016). sensitive to fat

Russell Keast Ph.D., CFS Professor (2016). Obese Patients Less Sensitive To Fat Leading to Overconsumption and Weight Gain 

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