Some Non-Obese Adults Still Have Metabolic Syndrome

Robert Wong, M.D., M.S. Attending Physician, Gastroenterology & Hepatology Director, GI Education & Research Highland Hospital A member of Alameda Health System Oakland, CA 94602MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Robert Wong, M.D., M.S.
Attending Physician, Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Director, GI Education & Research
Highland Hospital A member of Alameda Health System
Oakland, CA 94602

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Wong: The rising prevalence of obesity and diabetes has led to concurrent rise in metabolic syndrome in the U.S.  Identifying metabolic syndrome is important to implement targeted treatment as metabolic syndrome contributes to cardiovascular disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and overall mortality.  However, while obesity is a major risk factor for metabolic syndrome, out study highlights the importance of considering metabolic syndrome even in individuals who do not meet criteria for obesity.  We demonstrated that nearly 20% of adults who do not meet current definitions of obesity still have metabolic syndrome in the U.S.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Wong: The main takeaway from our study is for providers to be vigilant in considering the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome even when the traditional risk factor of obesity is not present.  We are beginning to understand that such factors as insulin resistance and visceral or central adiposity are more important risk factors for metabolic syndrome and its associated health consequences.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Wong: Future research in this area would benefit from better understand the differential impact of different components of metabolic syndrome across different ethnic groups and the differential impact of metabolic syndrome on long term health consequences.

Citation:

One in Five Adults in the United States Who Are Not Obese Have Metabolic Syndrome: An Analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2012

Robert Wong, M.D., M.S. (2015). Some Non-Obese Adults Still Have Metabolic Syndrome

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