CHEST 2014: Electronic Stethoscope For Evaluation of Lung and Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ilina and Medha KrishenMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ilina and Medha Krishen
Michigan high school students and sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. Their research was presented at the 2014 CHEST national meeting. Ilina and Medha have kindly agreed to discuss their work for the MedicalResearch.com audience.

Medical Research: Ilina, please tell us a little about you and the background for your study.

Ilina: I am a senior at Port Huron Northern High School in Fort Gratiot, Michigan. I was exploring the effects of air pollutants on lungs using frequency analysis of lung recordings.  My goal was to see if I could pick up early changes in healthy smokers and firefighters.

Dr. Sridhar Reddy, a local pulmonologist and occupational medicine expert mentored me.  He lent me his electronic stethoscope.  I am a violinist and a clarinet player, so initially had a lot of fun analyzing music frequencies. Later, I moved to lung sounds (a little more difficult!).

I used a Thinklabs Electronic Stethoscope for recording lung sounds. The inventor, Mr. Clive Smith, helped me understand the stethoscope.

I used the MATLAB program for analyzing frequencies.  Mr. Charles Munson, a graduate student at the University of Michigan, helped me write the software program for it.
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Stethoscopes Coated with Bacteria

Professor Didier Pittet, MD, MS Director, Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine SwitzerlandMedicalResearch.com Interview with :
Professor Didier Pittet, MD, MS
Director, Infection Control Program and WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, University of Geneva Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Switzerland


MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Prof. Pittet:  The density of bacterial contamination of the stethoscope’s membrane is closely correlated with the density of bacterial counts on the doctor’s fingertips.

This is true for both common skin comensals and multi-resistant nosocomial pathogens such as MRSA.
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