Author Interviews, Kidney Disease / 30.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Silvi Shah, MD,MS,FASN,FACP Associate Professor Internal Medicine | College of Medicine University of Cincinnati College of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: AKI  (Acute Kidney Injury) is a major contributor to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). About a third of patients with ESKD recover kidney function due to AKI. The study looked at the health outcomes of 22,922 patients from the U.S. Renal Data System from 2005 to 2014 to construct a clinical scoring system to predict kidney recovery within 90 days and 12 months after the start of dialysis for kidney failure patients due to acute kidney injury (AKI) (more…)
Author Interviews / 29.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Larry Kosinski, MD Gastroenterologist and SonarMD Founder & Board Member MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Would you briefly explain what is meant by the IBD group of diseases? Response:  Affecting up to 70 million Americans, the U.S. spends $136 billion each year on digestive health as these conditions are complex to predict, treat and manage. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) includes people specifically diagnosed with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, and these conditions require close monitoring to reduce the risk for complications that lead to lengthy hospital stays and significant medical spend. In addition to providing a holistic health program, the SonarMD digital platform risk stratifies patients and performs continuous symptom checks to identify deteriorating symptoms sooner and communicate changes to physicians, meaning that care teams can intervene faster to keep patients healthier and lower the overall cost of care. The two large, longitudinal studies that we presented at Digestive Disease Week 2024 evaluated several major drivers of medical costs in people living with IBD and enrolled in the SonarMD end-to-end, digital care coordination program to determine if SonarMD’s program reduced healthcare utilization and concurrently produced better health outcomes. To assess this, we looked at Emergency Department visits and In-patient Admissions compared to risk-matched control groups. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Blood Pressure - Hypertension, OBGYNE / 29.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Emmanuel Bujold, Reproduction Mother and Child Health Unit CHU De Québec-Université Laval Research Center Université Laval Québec, QC Canada     MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Would you briefly describe what is meant by preeclampsia? Response: Preeclampsia is a complication of the second half of pregnancy, manifesting as high blood pressure and renal dysfunction. The only current treatment is to deliver the baby before it becomes complicated by damage to maternal organs or fetal distress. A few years ago, we demonstrated that aspirin started in the 1st trimester can prevent the majority of preeclampsias in pregnant women at risk. It has therefore become urgent to identify pregnant women at risk as early as the 1st trimester. (more…)
Addiction, Author Interviews, Health Care Systems / 25.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Srivastava Kodavatiganti, MBS Department of Medical Education Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Scranton, PA MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Prescription and illicit opioid misuse and overdoses have continued to escalate in the U.S. with annual overdoses exceeding 110,000[1]. There was a substantial rise from 2013 to 2022 in the number of opioid-related overdoses due to synthetic opioids [2]. Even nonfatal opioid-involved overdoses increased 4% quarterly between January 2018 and March 2022 as observed by encounters by emergency medical services [3]. Although the eastern U.S. has been particularly impacted by fatal overdoses, annual increases have increased as of last year in the western states including in Nevada (+27.9%), Washington (+36.9%), Oregon (+38.6%), and Alaska (+45.9%).  In contrast, other states have seen more modest changes (New Mexico = +1.3%) including decreases (South Dakota = -2.4%, Nebraska = -19.5%) [1]. These findings underscore the importance for understanding patterns in usage of prevention and treatment strategies. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist which can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. This crucial lifesaving tool is administered as an injection or as a nasal spray. This study characterized the patterns of naloxone prescriptions in Medicaid patients from 2018 – 2021 and Medicare patients for 2019. State level differences were also quantified as the fold difference in prescribing between the highest and lowest states when correcting for the number of enrollees in each state. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Melanoma, Race/Ethnic Diversity / 24.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Andrew F. Alexis, MD, MPH Vice-Chair for Diversity and Inclusion Department of Dermatology Dermatologist Center for Diverse Skin Complexions Weill Cornell Medicine – NY MedicalResearch.com: What are the main types of skin cancer?  Is the incidence changing? Response: The 3 main types of skin cancer are melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States1 and 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. (2) The overall incidence has changed as follows:Melanoma: Rates doubled over past 30 years from 1982 to 2011.3 It differs by age group. o Adolescents and adults age 30 and younger: incidence rate is declining o Older age groups (e.g. 80 and older): incidence rate is increasing • Squamous Cell Cancer: o Incidence increased 263% between 1976-1984 and 2000-20104 • Basal Cell Cancer: o Incidence increased 145% between 1976-1984 and 2000-20104 (more…)
Author Interviews / 22.05.2024

For nurses, managing the demands of their profession while taking care of their own well-being can be a significant challenge. Long hours, high stress, and emotional demands can take a toll, making self-care an essential component of their routine. This article explores practical self-care strategies tailored for nurses on the go, offering advice on maintaining physical health, mental clarity, and emotional stability. By integrating these practices into their daily lives, nurses can enhance their resilience and provide the best care for their patients while also taking care of themselves.

Prioritizing Physical Health

Physical health is the foundation of a nurse's ability to perform their duties. Regular exercise, even in short bursts, can significantly improve physical stamina and overall health. Simple activities like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, a quick walk during breaks, or stretching exercises can be integrated into a busy schedule. Proper nutrition is also crucial; packing healthy snacks such as fruits, nuts, and yogurt can help sustain energy throughout long shifts. Staying hydrated is equally important, as dehydration can lead to fatigue and decreased cognitive function. (more…)
Author Interviews, Pulmonary Disease, Sleep Disorders / 21.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ankit Parekh, PhD Director of the Sleep And Circadian Analysis (SCAN) Group Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine) Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Sleep apnea is associated with incident cardiovascular disease, and is a common chronic condition affecting over a billion people worldwide. In diagnosing and treating sleep apnea, it is imperative to establish the type of sleep apnea—whether it is obstructive or central sleep apnea. The differential contribution of central vs. obstructive sleep apnea toward incidental cardiovascular disease in those with significant sleep apnea has not been well studied. Our group has developed an automated algorithm that deduces on a breath-by-breath level whether reductions in airflow are predominantly due to obstructive or central phenomena. Our algorithm uses several features that are known to be key in distinguishing the type of events and derives a probability of obstruction across each “small” (reduced amplitude) breath. The breath-by-breath probability is then used to determine whether a patient’s burden of sleep apnea is predominantly obstructive or central. In this work, we analyzed sleep study data from The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) cohort (N=2793) consisting of elderly men, across two visits separated on average by 6.5 years, and derived the probability of obstruction on a breath-by-breath level. The median probability of obstruction for each subject was computed and analyzed against outcomes of cardiovascular disease. We also assessed the stability of the metric in those without any prevalent cardiovascular disease. We find that median probability of obstruction was stable across the two visits, and those with any incident cardiovascular disease had a lower median probability of obstruction: patients with incident cardiovascular outcomes had a significant burden of sleep apnea that was predominantly “central” in nature. (more…)
Author Interviews, CDC, Infections / 20.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Cathryn Haigh, Ph.D. Chief Prion Cell Biology Unit Laboratory of Neurological Infections and Immunity National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Division of Intramural Research, Rocky Mountain Laboratories National Institutes of Health Hamilton, MT 59840 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study,  ie what are prions/prion-related diseases?  Where are prions found? Response: Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals.  In humans these diseases often manifest as rapidly progressing dementias but are rarely caused by a known exposure to the infectious agents (prions).  More commonly they are sporadic (no known cause) or hereditary. One form of human disease is believed to have arisen from eating beef contaminated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (as known as mad cow disease).  This has resulted in concerns that chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disease affecting deer, elk and moose, might also have the potential to cross the species barrier and cause disease in humans.  To date, transmissions of CWD prions to cynomolgus macaques have been negative, a good sign that crossing the species barrier would not be easy, but macaques are not human so we wanted to test whether CWD could infect human brain tissue. To do this we used a human cerebral organoid model (mini human brain tissues grown from skin cells in a laboratory) and directly exposed the organoids to prions from the brains of animals that had died of CWD. (more…)
Author Interviews / 20.05.2024

Proper-Hand-WashingIn recent years, our communities have faced unprecedented challenges to public health and hygiene, especially after the most recent global pandemic. Beyond the immediate crises, longstanding issues like poor dietary choices and the rising stress levels in people worldwide have further highlighted the critical need for robust health and hygiene practices. These concerns, while global in scale, demand local solutions—initiatives that begin in our own neighborhoods. Promoting health and hygiene at a community level not only addresses these urgent issues but also sets the foundation for broader national change. This article offers ten tips for anyone eager to lead such transformative efforts within their community, underscoring that even the smallest steps can pave the way to significant health improvements for all.
  1. Educate Yourself and Others
Empowering yourself with knowledge is the cornerstone of health advocacy. Understanding the latest public health guidelines and hygiene practices can significantly impact your ability to foster change. Organize community workshops and health talks with local health professionals to spread this knowledge. These gatherings can be held at community centers, libraries, or online platforms, making them accessible to a wider audience. Distributing flyers, creating informational pamphlets, and using community bulletin boards can also help in educating people who might not have access to digital resources. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cost of Health Care, Gastrointestinal Disease, Health Care Systems / 20.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Laura Targownik, MD Lead author and Clinician-Investigator Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto Departmental Division Director, Gastroenterology and Hepatology University of Toronto MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Was there a difference in the types of patients or need for surgery seen by the female/male physicians? Response: The background for this study is that there is an emerging body of literature that having a female physician leads to better patient outcomes in many health care settings, especially amongst patients undergoing surgery or being admitted to hospital.  However, this has not previously been evaluated in gastroenterology.  Female and male gastroenterologists may have different styles of practice on average, and this potentially could lead to differences in how patients engage with the health care system following an initial assessment. (more…)
Aging, Author Interviews, Frailty, JAMA, Orthopedics / 16.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Chintan V. Dave PharmD, PhD Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and Epidemiology Assistant Director Rutgers Center for Pharmacoepidemiology and Treatment Science Academic Director Rutgers Center for Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Our study examined the association between initiation of an antihypertensive medication and its correlation with fracture risk among older nursing home veterans. (more…)
Author Interviews, CDC, Exercise - Fitness / 15.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Tessa Clemens, PhDH Health scientist in the Division of Injury Prevention CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Data showed an increase in drowning deaths after years of decline and drowning is the leading cause of death among children ages 1-4. We know that swimming lessons reduce the risk of drowning, but not everyone has the same access to swimming lessons. In this study, we described which groups saw the greatest increases in drowning and analyzed swimming skills and swimming lesson participation data. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dental Research / 12.05.2024

 Brussels, 10 May 2024. Gum health may play a pivotal role in overall health and quality of being, and deserves to be better acknowledged and explored by the research community. That is why the EFP promotes Gum Health Day 2024 on 12 May, an outreach initiative celebrated in more than 30 countries around the world to raise awareness among the medical profession and the general public of the importance of periodontal health. Dr Mia Rakic, Gum Health Day 2024 co-ordinator and member of the executive committee of the EFP (European Federation of Periodontology, efp.org), explains why Gum Health Day 2024 focuses on Generation Z and why gum health is so relevant: (more…)
Author Interviews, Mental Health Research, Pain Research, Personalized Medicine / 10.05.2024

On your path to recovery after an injury, you’ll find that medical science keeps evolving. New treatments and tech are not just healing; they’re changing the game of how we bounce back. Guided by fresh insights into technology, we make sure your way back is as effective as it is straightforward. Photo by cottonbro studio Healing Faster: Breakthroughs in Recovery from Personal InjuriesUnderstanding the Latest Diagnostic Tools Enhancing Personal Injury Recovery In the realm of personal injury recovery, precision in diagnosis is key. Advanced imaging techniques such as High-definition fiber tractography (HDFT) now allow for a superior visualization of neural pathways. Medical pros can pinpoint where you’re hurt with such precision, crafting a rehab plan that fits just right. Thanks to biomarker technology, figuring out how long recovery will take has gotten a whole lot smarter. Imagine doctors using clues from your body’s own building blocks—genes and proteins—to create a recovery plan that’s all about you. It means less wondering, “Will this work?” and more knowing it will help stitch things back together quickly. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, University of Pittsburgh / 09.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Roderick J. O’Sullivan PhD Associate Professor Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology UPMC Hillman Cancer Center University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: For a few years, my group has had the good fortune of collaborating with Dr. Ivan Ahel. Ivan is a world leader in the field of ADP-ribosylation. His work has identified major gaps in our understanding of ADP-ribosylation. This includes his lab discovering that DNA bases can be ADP-ribosylated in bacteria and that a poorly characterized enzyme known as TARG1 could be involved in that process. In discussing this work with Ivan, we were confident that DNA ADP-ribosylation also exists in human cells and that showing this could be pretty important. The problem was that identifying a part of the genome where it might be present, so we could study it, was not so obvious and challenging. But we had a hunch that telomeres could be one part of the genome where it could happen!! Telomeres are really special structures located at the ends of each human chromosome. They demarcate the physical end of each chromosome and prevent chromosomes from becoming entangled – which if it happens, is catastrophic for cells. Our hunch was based on the evidence from other studies that telomeres are natural targets of PARP1, the enzyme that catalyzes most of the ADP-ribosylation in human cells. I then discussed this idea with Anne Wondisford, a medical scientist trainee in the lab, who liked the idea and designed a series of experiments to test it. (more…)
ADHD, Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Stroke / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Anders Holt MD PhD Department of Cardiology Copenhagen University Hospital–Herlev and Gentofte Gentofte Hospitalsvej Hellerup, Denmark MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What types of ADHD treatments were in the study? Response: An increasing number of adults are being diagnosed with ADHD and subsequently treated. Taking the drugs' effect on the sympathetic nervous system into account, it seems relevant to investigate whether treatment could be associated with an elevated long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. The drugs included in the study were methylphenidate, atomoxetine, lisdexamfetamine, dexamfetamine, and modafinil. Owing to the fact that atomoxetine is not a sympathomimetic amine as the others, separate supplementary analyses were carried out for this drug, yielding similar results. (more…)
Author Interviews, Brain Injury, Cannabis / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Pamela Maher, PhD Research Professor Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory SALK Institute for Biologic Studies La Jolla California   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Several years ago, we tested several different cannabinoids for protection against the oxytosis/ferroptosis regulated cell death pathway and found CBN (cannabinol) to be one of the most effective. While THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidol) were also quite protective, we wanted to pursue non-psychoactive cannabinoids. Since we are interested in maintaining brain function in the context of aging and disease, we thought that a psychoactive compound could be problematic. In addition, there was already a lot of work on CBD, so we thought we could learn more and contribute more to the field by studying CBN. (more…)
Author Interviews, Sexual Health, Urology / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: dr-michelle-pearlman-mdDr. Amy Pearlman MD GenitoUrinary Surgeon and Sexual Medicine Specialist Board-Certified in Urology MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: There is significant controversy within urology (and in mainstream conversation) regarding penile enhancement. Our clinical experience with the PhalloFill protocol over the last 4 years has yielded great clinical and safety results. The purpose of our research is to study our outcomes in a more scientific fashion and, as a result, to be able to use this information to help educate potential patients, current patients, interested folks in the community, and other healthcare providers. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, JAMA, Nutrition / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marta Guasch-Ferré, PhD Associate Professor and Deputy Head of Section, Section of Epidemiology University of Copenhagen Group Leader, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response:  Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fats and contains compounds with antioxidant activity that may play a protective role for the brain. Olive oil as part of a Mediterranean diet appears to have a beneficial effect against cognitive decline. Higher olive oil intake was previously associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. But its association with dementia mortality was unknown. (more…)
Author Interviews, Environmental Risks / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gediminas "Gedi" Mainelis, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What types of particles, ie where do they come from? Response: This work is a continuation of my research on nanoparticles in consumer products. We have investigated and published on the release of particles from nano-enabled consumer products, such as cosmetic powders, various sprays and clothing. In this project, we were interested in potential resuspension of particles once nano-enabled consumer sprays are used. The particles are added into consumer products to provide them certain desired properties, like antimicrobial protection, odor reduction or protection against UV (sunscreen). Once the products are used, the particles are released and we could be exposed to them. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews / 02.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Li Gan PhD Burton P. and Judith B. Resnick Distinguished Professor in Neurodegenerative Diseases Brain and Mind Research Institute Weill Cornell Medical College Shiaoching Gong PhD Helen and Robert Appel Alzheimer’s Disease Institute Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Would you describe the process of making these neurons? Response: Primary tauopathies are a group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the pathological aggregation of 3R or 4R tau protein in neurons and/or glial cells, where 4R tauopathies are more common primary tauopathies. The exact pathological mechanisms remain elusive. There are currently no therapies available that can halt or reverse the spread of tau aggregates since the drug effects found in animal models are not always reproduced in human clinical trials. The development of tau therapies from human cells have become urgently needed. Induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer a unique model to better understand pathological mechanisms underlying human diseases and to develop human cell-based therapy. However, a major challenge to study 4R tauopathy is iPSC-derived neurons express very low levels of 4R Tau isoforms making it difficult to study 4R tauopathy and the mutations located in 4R Tau. To address this need, we designed and engineered a robust human iPSC 4R tauopathy model using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We first introduced specific mutations at the intron-exon 10 junctions and silent mutations within exon 10 to promote exon 10 inclusion, leading the increase of 4R isoforms expression in iPSC-derived neurons. Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) mutation, P301S located in exon 10 is highly aggregation prone. To generate this human disease 4R tauopathy model, we then introduced this mutation to 4R iPSC to make it a 4RP301S iPSC line. (more…)
Author Interviews, Breast Cancer, JAMA, USPSTF / 01.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Wanda K. Nicholson, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A. Senior Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Professor of Prevention and Community Health Milken Institute School of Public Health George Washington University Dr. Nicholson was appointed chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in March 2024. She served as vice chair from March 2022 to March 2024 and as a member of the Task Force from January 2009 through December 2013. MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths for women in the U.S. After reviewing the latest science, the Task Force recommends screening all women for breast cancer every other year starting at age 40 and continuing through age 74. This new approach has the potential to save nearly 20 percent more lives from breast cancer and has even greater potential benefit for Black women, who are much more likely to die from breast cancer. (more…)
Author Interviews, Health Care Systems / 27.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gaurav Khanna Ph.D. Assistant Professor | School of Global Policy and Strategy University of California, San Diego www.econgaurav.com   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: There is a shortage of doctors in certain parts of the US. For instance, although about 20% of the United States population live in rural areas, only 11% of physicians practice in these locations. The research shows that relaxed visa requirements enable more foreign-trained doctors to practice in remote and low-income areas, without reducing the employment of U.S.-trained doctors. One such program that facilitates keeping foreign-born physicians in the US is the Conrad 30 Program. Most participants in the Conrad 30 Waiver Program work in Health Professional Shortage Areas (or HPSAs), areas lacking an adequate number of primary care physicians, dentists, or mental health care providers. (more…)
Author Interviews, CDC, Infections, JAMA / 27.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Shruti K. Gohil, MD Assistant Professor, Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Associate Medical Director, Epidemiology & Infection Prevention, Infectious Diseases UCI School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?
  • Antibiotic resistance, which occurs when germs like bacteria and fungi mutate to defeat the drugs designed to kill them, is a major public health threat.
  • Data show that 40-50% of patients hospitalized with pneumonia receive broad spectrum antibiotics when they do not need them.
  • Helping clinicians tailor antibiotic prescriptions to individual patients can improve patient outcomes by preserving healthy bacteria in the body and reducing the risk of future antibiotic resistance.
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Annals Internal Medicine, Author Interviews, Gender Differences, UCLA / 25.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Yusuke Tsugawa, MD, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine & Health Policy and Management, UCLA Director of Data Core, UCLA Department of Medicine Statistics Core Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Los Angeles, CA 90024   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Prior studies have found that female and male physicians practice medicine differently. For example, female physicians are, on average, more likely to abide by clinical guidelines and spend more time listening to patients. However, evidence was limited as to whether such differences have clinically meaningful impact on patients’ health outcomes, which was the aim of this study. (more…)
Author Interviews, COVID -19 Coronavirus, JAMA, Technology, UCSD, Vaccine Studies / 25.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: John W. AyersJohn W. Ayers, PhD MA Vice Chief of Innovation | Assoc. Professor
Div. Infectious Disease & Global Public Health University of California San Diego Since the World Health Organization declared an ‘infodemic’ of misinformation, there have been surprisingly few achievements to celebrate. X's Community Notes have emerged as an innovative strategy to address misinformation as reported in the latest issue of JAMA.
Before the inception of Community Notes, social media companies employed various tactics to tackle misinformation, including censoring, shadowbanning (muting a user or their content on a platform without informing them), and adding generic warning labels to problematic content. However, these efforts were typically undisclosed meaning their effectiveness could not be studied.

In late 2022, X introduced Community Notes. This novel approach empowers volunteer, independent, anonymous, and ideologically diverse contributors to identify posts containing misinformation and to rectify misinformation by appending informative "notes" to suspect posts. The process is controlled by the public, instead of decision-makers at the company. Most importantly the system is open-sourced so it can be studied by external scientists.

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Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, Mental Health Research, NIH / 19.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sharon Dekel PhD Principal Investigator Director of the Postpartum Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, 02114 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Maternal psychopathologies affect a significant number of American women and are the leading complications of childbirth and a significant contributor to maternal death. Maternal (physical) morbidity in the US remain the highest among all countries in the West, suggesting that some women will have a traumatic childbirth experience. The most common mental illness associated with trauma is posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD stemming from childbirth is estimated to affect 6% of delivering women (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28443054/). In high-risk groups, for example women who have unscheduled Cesareans the rate is estimated at 20% or higher (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31041603/.). Although we screen for postpartum depression in hospitals in the USA there is no screening for what we define as childbirth-related PTSD (CB-PTSD). The overarching goal of the Dekel Lab is to develop novel and patient-friendly screening tools to identify women with this disorder. As importantly traumatic childbirth disproportionality affects Black and Latina women (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35598158/). (more…)
Author Interviews, Cannabis / 18.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Amy Kennalley, MBS First Year Medical Student Department of Medical Education Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study Response: The legalization of medical marijuana (MMJ) and the number of qualifying conditions are expanding across the USA, emphasizing the need to understand the implications of MMJ dispensary distribution for equitable access. Pennsylvania (PA) legalized MMJ in 2016, with the first dispensary opening its doors in 2018. The state currently recognizes 24 medical conditions for MMJ use, including six for which there is insufficient or no evidence for their efficacy as a treatment. Prior research suggests that there is a link between proximity to dispensaries and overall MMJ use. However, a gap exists in our understanding of how dispensary locations might be associated with the specific qualifying conditions for which individuals receive their certification. In response to this knowledge gap, our study delved into the medical marijuana dispensary access in PA and explored associations with both MMJ certifications and the community demographics. Utilizing data from the Pennsylvania Department of Health, we investigated how proximity to MMJ dispensaries related to the proportion of individuals certified for MMJ use within a specific area or Zip Code Tabulation Area. Additionally, we analyzed the proportion of certifications for conditions with varying levels of evidence supporting the efficacy of MMJ. This pioneering study represents the first of its kind in PA, shedding light on the association between MMJ dispensary locations and certifications. Likewise, it is the first in the US to investigate the link between dispensary locations and specific qualifying conditions. By examining these dynamics, we aim to contribute vital insights to inform policy and practice, ensuring equitable access to MMJ treatment for individuals with diverse medical needs. (more…)
AACR, Author Interviews, Biomarkers, Breast Cancer, Cancer Research / 11.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: RJ Tesi M.D. CEO and Founder of INmune Bio MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?
  • MUC4 expression by high-risk breast cancer (HER2+ or TNBC) is a biomarker that predicts resistance to therapy and an increased risk a metastasis. MUC4 expression can be determined at time of biopsy and therapeutic decisions should be adjusted to optimize the chance of response to first line therapy.
This biomarker is easily determined using immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic breast biopsy tissue similar to testing for HER2 expression. Testing for MUC4 can be easily added to the current panel of routine stains obtained at the time of the diagnostic biopsy. Knowing MUC4 status in women with high-risk breast cancer will improve results.
  • Soluble TNF causes the up regulation of immune checkpoint proteins of cells of the TME. This includes CD47 and SIRPa on tumor based macrophages and CTLA4, PD1, LAG3 and TIGIT on T cells in the TME. INB03 is a pan immune checkpoint modulator. Treatment with INB03 downregulates all immune checkpoint proteins on the cells. Downmodulation of all immune checkpoint proteins improves response to immunotherapy.
Currently, monoclonal antibodies targeting immune checkpoint proteins are a mainstay of cancer therapy and cancer drug development. These strategies target one immune checkpoint protein at a time. To date, combination therapy targeting two immune checkpoint proteins has been tried (e.g.: anti-PD1 and anti-CTLA4 combination therapy) with mixed results. Combination immune checkpoint strategies may increase therapeutic response but increase toxicity. INB03 downregulates all immune checkpoint proteins. This is equivalent to giving a patient a 6 antibody cocktail – something that cannot be done in man. As expected, decreased immune checkpoint expression improves response to therapy by converting immunotherapy resistant tumors to immunotherapy sensitive tumors.
  • In TNBC, MUC4 expression predicts both resistance to anti-PD1 therapy and increased risk of distant metastasis. Treatment with INB03 decreases expression of proteins associated with tumor metastasis, decreases the number of metastasis and improves response to anti-PD1 therapy. Early use of INB03 may prevent distal disease and improve tumor control.
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