MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com specializes in exclusive interviews with medical researchers from major and specialty journals and presenters at health care meetings.
Over 9108 interviews to date!
More than 1837 interviews with researchers from JAMA, 313 Lancet, 310 NEJM,
405 BMJ interviews

    • Enabling Angioplasty-Ready “Smart” Stents to Detect In-Stent Restenosis and Occlusion

      Enabling Angioplasty-Ready “Smart” Stents to Detect In-Stent Restenosis and Occlusion

      MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Kenichi Takahata, Ph.D., P.Eng. Associate Professor Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Faculty of Applied Science University of British Columbia Vancouver, B.C., Canada MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this technology and study?  Response: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is … Continue reading →Read More »
    • Watson for Clinical Trial Matching Increases Enrollment in Breast Cancer Trials

      Watson for Clinical Trial Matching Increases Enrollment in Breast Cancer Trials

      Alexandra Urman, MPH Clinical Research Manager Clinical Development IBM Watson Health  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  Response: Cancer statistics show only 3-5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials although up to 20% may be eligible. Dr. Tufia Hadad, a medical Oncologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota sought to address this issue and spearheaded a project conducted at the Rochester facility in collaboration with IBM Watson Health. The objective was to determine if the use of cognitive computing increased clinical trial enrollment and screening efficiency in the breast cancer clinic. Watson for Clinical Trial Matching (CTM) is a cognitive system which utilizes natural language processing to derive patient and tumor attributes from unstructured text in the electronic health record that can be further used to match a patient to complex eligibility criteria in trial protocols. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Breast Cancer Incidence

      Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Breast Cancer Incidence

      Cedric F. Garland, Dr.P.H., F.A.C.E. Adjunct Professor Division of Epidemiology Department of Family Medicine and Public Health University of California San Diego La Jolla, California 92093-0620 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Studies mapping death rates from female breast cancer in the US, the former USSR and Canada by Drs. Edward Gorham, and Frank and Cedric Garland revealed for the first time in history that death rates from breast cancer tracked latitude where people lived. The rates were highest in the least sunny northern tier of states, lowest in the sunny southwest. This led these scientists to be the first to theorize that vitamin D prevents breast cancer” said study first author Sharon McDonnell. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Bisexual Men Face Greater Risk of Heart Disease

      Bisexual Men Face Greater Risk of Heart Disease

      Billy A. Caceres, PhD, RN, AGPCNP-BC NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing New York, NY 10010 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Although current evidence, primarily based on self-reported data, suggests gay and bisexual men report higher rates of cardiovascular risk factors (such as poor mental health and tobacco use) than heterosexual men, few studies have examined heart disease risk in this population. This study is one of the few studies to examine heart disease risk in gay and bisexual men using biological measures. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Unrelated Bacterial Strains Can Transfer Antibiotic Resistance Genes To Each Other

      Unrelated Bacterial Strains Can Transfer Antibiotic Resistance Genes To Each Other

      MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Richard Stanton, PhD Health Scientist, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion Centers for Disease Control and Prevention MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: We used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to investigate an outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) that occurred in an acute care hospital in Kentucky over a six month period in late 2016. The outbreak included 18 cases of CRE. Continue reading →Read More »
    • No Evidence Probiotics Will Reduce Your Anxiety

      No Evidence Probiotics Will Reduce Your Anxiety

      Daniel Reis MA Graduate Student Clinical Psychology University of Kansas MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Probiotics have generated considerable interest as a possible treatment for numerous forms of physical and mental illness. Preliminary evidence from both preclinical and clinical studies suggest that probiotics may be able to reduce anxiety. Our goal was to comprehensively review and summarize existing preclinical and clinical studies. Overall, probiotic administration reduced anxiety-like behaviors in rodents, but only in those with some form of experimentally-induced disease (such as early-life stress or socieal defeat). Probiotics did not reduce anxiety in humans. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Anti-PD1 Immunotherapy May Work Better in Older Melanoma Patients

      Anti-PD1 Immunotherapy May Work Better in Older Melanoma Patients

      Ashani Weeraratna, Ph.D. The Ira Brind professor and Co-program leader of the Immunology, Microenvironment and Metastasis Program The Wistar Institute Member of Wistar’s Melanoma Research Center Philadelphia  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?  Response:  This study shows for the first time that older patients, especially those who have had prior MAPKi therapy fare better than younger patients when treated with anti-PD1. We found that tumors in younger patients and younger mice have higher levels of Tregulatory cells, the cells that regulate other immune cells. This is not true systemically, only within the tumor microenvironment. We were surprised because we expected that, as with targeted therapy, older patients would have a poorer response to immunotherapy, given what we perceive as a poorer immune system in older patients.  Continue reading →Read More »
    • Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Patients Have Higher Likelihood of Osteoporosis

      Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Patients Have Higher Likelihood of Osteoporosis

      Dr. Jonathan L. Silverberg MD PhD MPH Assistant Professor in Dermatology Medical Social Sciences and Preventive Medicine Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Persons with atopic dermatitis have a number of risk factors for osteopenia and osteoporosis, including systemic atopy and inflammation, being less physically active and using a lot of topical and/or systemic corticosteroids. We aimed to determine whether adults with atopic dermatitis in fact have higher rates of physician-diagnosed osteopenia and osteoporosis. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Individuals With Very High Levels of Lipoprotein(a) May Benefit Most From LDL(a)-Lowering Drugs

      Individuals With Very High Levels of Lipoprotein(a) May Benefit Most From LDL(a)-Lowering Drugs

      Dr. Stephen Burgess PhD Programme Leader at the Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit University of Cambridge MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Lipoprotein(a) is a lipoprotein subclass, and an important biomarker for coronary heart disease. As a clinical biomarker, it has a similar story to LDL-cholesterol (“bad” cholesterol), in that it is thought to be a causal risk factor for coronary heart disease, and so is a potential target for drug development. However, while drugs that lower LDL-cholesterol, such as statins, have been successful in reducing coronary heart disease risk, drugs that lower lipoprotein(a) have not as yet been successful. New drugs are currently in development that specifically target lipoprotein(a) and can lower lipoprotein(a) concentrations by 80-90%. We performed this study to investigate whether these drugs are likely to be successful in reducing coronary heart disease risk. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Stress Disorders Linked to Increase Risk of Autoimmune Disease

      Stress Disorders Linked to Increase Risk of Autoimmune Disease

      Huan Song Associated Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Karolinska Institutet MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Earlier findings from our group (e.g. Fang et al., NEJM 2012; Arnberg et al., Lancet Psychiatry 2015; Lu et al., JAMA Oncol 2016; Shen et al., BMJ 2016; Zhu et al., Ann Oncol 2017) have identified pathways through which stressful events contribute to deterioration in human health. With strong animal models and human data supporting a role of stress in immune dysregulation, the hypothesis linking mental distress with autoimmune is indeed plausible. However, the evidence is as yet limited to clinical observations and a few larger observational studies on US veterans, most of them on men only, and some of which have cross-sectional designs and various other methodological shortcomings. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Stress Echocardiography vs Coronary CT To Evaluate Chest Pain in ER

      Stress Echocardiography vs Coronary CT To Evaluate Chest Pain in ER

      Jeffrey M. Levsky, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Radiology Associate Professor, Department of Medicine (Cardiology) Albert Einstein College of Medicine Montefiore Medical Center MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Millions of Americans are evaluated each year for acute chest pain in the Emergency Department.  There are multiple modalities that can be used to triage these patients and there have only been a few studies comparing different imaging methods. We chose to study Stress Echocardiography and Coronary CT Angiography, two exams that have not been compared directly in this population.  We found that Stress Echocardiography was able to discharge a higher proportion of patients in a shorter amount of time as compared to Coronary CTA.  Continue reading →Read More »
    • Some Young People With Sudden Cardiac Death Have Congenital Heart Defect

      Some Young People With Sudden Cardiac Death Have Congenital Heart Defect

      Thomas Hadberg Lynge MD The Department of Cardiology The Heart Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Denmark MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Congenital heart defects are common and affect ≈0.8% of all live births. Despite substantially improve survival over the past decades, morbidity and mortality remain significant, in particular among patients with complex congenital heart defects. This decreased life expectancy is in part explained by an increased risk of sudden cardiac death among people with congenital heart defects. However, the incidence of sudden cardiac death among people with congenital heart defects is largely unknown in an unselected and nationwide setting. Sudden cardiac death can occur both at rest and during exercise and it is well-known that exercise is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death during activity. Fear of sudden cardiac death has led to restrictions of physical activity among patients with congenital heart defects and these patients have lower levels of physical activity compared with healthy peers. Appropriate counseling of these patients requires estimates on risk of sudden cardiac death in relation to physical activity. Continue reading →Read More »
    • Trial of Antibody Immunotherapy in Parkinson’s Disease

      Trial of Antibody Immunotherapy in Parkinson’s Disease

      Joseph Jankovic, MD Professor of Neurology Distinguished Chair in Movement Disorders Director, Parkinson’s Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic Department of Neurology Baylor College of Medicine Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center at the McNair Campus Houston, TX 77030-4202   MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your study?  First demonstration of an anti-α-synuclein antibody immunotherapy in patients with Parkinson’s Disease. Robust target engagement led to mean reduction of up to 97% in serum free α-synuclein levels. Central Nervous System penetration is supported by a dose-dependent increase in PRX002/RG7935 levels in Cerebral Spinal Fluid. All dose levels of PRX002/RG7935 had acceptable safety and tolerability profiles, meeting the primary objective of this study Data support ongoing PASADENA Phase 2 clinical study of PRX002/RG7935 (NCT03100149)   Continue reading →Read More »
    • Biochemical Test Promises To Aid in Diagnosis of ASD

      MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Juergen Hahn,  Professor and Department Head Department of Biomedical Engineering Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Autism Spectrum Disorder … Continue reading →Read More »
    • How Does Alcohol Affect Risk of Cancer or Premature Death?

      How Does Alcohol Affect Risk of Cancer or Premature Death?

      Andrew Kunzmann Research Fellow Queen's Universit Belfast MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?   Response: We decided to conduct this research because the messages about the health effects linked to light-moderate drinking are less consistent. Previous studies suggest that light-moderate drinking is linked to an increased risk of cancer but a lower risk of mortality than never drinking. The international guidelines around what constitutes drinking in moderation also differ, with UK guidelines now recommending intakes below 6 pints of beer or 175ml glasses of wine per week (equivalent to less than 1 per day) but other guidelines recommending intakes of 2 drinks or less per day. We wanted to see what the risk of getting either of these conditions (cancer or mortality) were to give a more comprehensive and less confusing message about the health effects of light-moderate drinking. Continue reading →Read More »