Mental Health Research, Nursing / 28.05.2024

Nurses play a crucial role in the healthcare system, often serving as the frontline of patient care. Their responsibilities are vast and demanding, from administering medications to providing emotional support to patients and their families. Given the high-stress nature of their work, it is imperative to recognize the importance of mental health support for nurses. Mental health support not only enhances their well-being but also improves patient care and the overall efficiency of healthcare services. This article explores the various facets of mental health support for nurses and why it is essential for the healthcare industry.

The High-Stress Environment of Nursing

Nursing is inherently a high-stress profession. Nurses are often required to work long hours, deal with critically ill patients, and make quick decisions that can significantly impact patient outcomes. This constant exposure to stress can lead to burnout, anxiety, and depression if not properly managed. The high-pressure environment can affect their mental and physical health, making it crucial to address these issues proactively. Providing mental health support helps nurses cope with the stressors of their job, ensuring they can continue to provide high-quality care without compromising their own health. (more…)
Addiction, Mental Health Research / 23.05.2024

healthy-lifestyles-longevityAdopting a healthy lifestyle is essential for enhancing longevity and improving overall well-being, and it involves making conscious choices that benefit both physical and mental health. While physical health often gets the spotlight, mental health is equally crucial. The United States of America is grappling with mental health issues, and San Antonio serves as a bitter reminder. Despite San Antonio investing $26 invested in the Metropolitan Health District's Mental Health initiatives in 2022, much more effort is needed. A new study has revealed that Texas is the state with the worst access to mental healthcare in America. This finding highlights the importance of holistic approaches to health that encompass both mental and physical aspects. In this guide, we will discuss six key lifestyle modifications that can enhance longevity.

1.   Embrace Sober Living

Maintaining sobriety is a fundamental aspect of enhancing both physical and mental health. Substance abuse can lead to a myriad of health issues, including liver disease, cardiovascular problems, and mental health disorders. A sober lifestyle can significantly improve your quality of life and increase your lifespan. This journey often requires support, which is where sober living facilities come into play. For those willing to embrace sober living San Antonio facilities, like New Day Sober Living, offers a secure environment where residents are surrounded by people who have similar goals and mindsets, which entails achieving long-term sobriety. These facilities offer structured living conditions and a community of peers who are also on the path to recovery. The supportive atmosphere helps individuals stay committed to their sobriety goals, reducing the risk of relapse and promoting overall well-being. By choosing sober living, you are taking a proactive step towards a healthier, longer life. (more…)
Health Care Systems, Mental Health Research / 21.05.2024

In the fast-paced world of healthcare, where clinical skills and knowledge are paramount, the power of empathy in leadership can sometimes be overlooked. However, leading with empathy in the healthcare sector is not just a nice-to-have quality; it's a pivotal trait that can shape patient outcomes, staff satisfaction, and the overall healthcare environment. This article delves into why empathy is crucial in healthcare leadership, supported by real-world insights and strategies to foster a culture of empathy.

The Impact of Technological Advancements

As technology continues to evolve within the healthcare sector, creating new opportunities for enhancing patient care, it's crucial that empathy doesn't get lost in the shuffle. Innovative tools and systems should be seen as avenues to deepen our understanding and connection with patients, rather than as barriers to the human touch. Embracing technology with empathetic intention can lead to an even greater level of personalized care. One specific area where empathy can play a transformative role is in addressing HR challenges in behavioral health. Understanding the unique nature of these challenges, and the emotional toll they can take on staff, is crucial for leaders who strive to create a supportive work environment. This deeper understanding can drive the implementation of effective solutions, fostering a workplace where empathy and professionalism thrive together. (more…)
Author Interviews, Mental Health Research, Pain Research, Personalized Medicine / 10.05.2024

On your path to recovery after an injury, you’ll find that medical science keeps evolving. New treatments and tech are not just healing; they’re changing the game of how we bounce back. Guided by fresh insights into technology, we make sure your way back is as effective as it is straightforward. Photo by cottonbro studio Healing Faster: Breakthroughs in Recovery from Personal InjuriesUnderstanding the Latest Diagnostic Tools Enhancing Personal Injury Recovery In the realm of personal injury recovery, precision in diagnosis is key. Advanced imaging techniques such as High-definition fiber tractography (HDFT) now allow for a superior visualization of neural pathways. Medical pros can pinpoint where you’re hurt with such precision, crafting a rehab plan that fits just right. Thanks to biomarker technology, figuring out how long recovery will take has gotten a whole lot smarter. Imagine doctors using clues from your body’s own building blocks—genes and proteins—to create a recovery plan that’s all about you. It means less wondering, “Will this work?” and more knowing it will help stitch things back together quickly. (more…)
ADHD, Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Stroke / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Anders Holt MD PhD Department of Cardiology Copenhagen University Hospital–Herlev and Gentofte Gentofte Hospitalsvej Hellerup, Denmark MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What types of ADHD treatments were in the study? Response: An increasing number of adults are being diagnosed with ADHD and subsequently treated. Taking the drugs' effect on the sympathetic nervous system into account, it seems relevant to investigate whether treatment could be associated with an elevated long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. The drugs included in the study were methylphenidate, atomoxetine, lisdexamfetamine, dexamfetamine, and modafinil. Owing to the fact that atomoxetine is not a sympathomimetic amine as the others, separate supplementary analyses were carried out for this drug, yielding similar results. (more…)
Author Interviews, Brain Injury, Cannabis / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Pamela Maher, PhD Research Professor Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory SALK Institute for Biologic Studies La Jolla California   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Several years ago, we tested several different cannabinoids for protection against the oxytosis/ferroptosis regulated cell death pathway and found CBN (cannabinol) to be one of the most effective. While THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidol) were also quite protective, we wanted to pursue non-psychoactive cannabinoids. Since we are interested in maintaining brain function in the context of aging and disease, we thought that a psychoactive compound could be problematic. In addition, there was already a lot of work on CBD, so we thought we could learn more and contribute more to the field by studying CBN. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, JAMA, Nutrition / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marta Guasch-Ferré, PhD Associate Professor and Deputy Head of Section, Section of Epidemiology University of Copenhagen Group Leader, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response:  Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fats and contains compounds with antioxidant activity that may play a protective role for the brain. Olive oil as part of a Mediterranean diet appears to have a beneficial effect against cognitive decline. Higher olive oil intake was previously associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. But its association with dementia mortality was unknown. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews / 02.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Li Gan PhD Burton P. and Judith B. Resnick Distinguished Professor in Neurodegenerative Diseases Brain and Mind Research Institute Weill Cornell Medical College Shiaoching Gong PhD Helen and Robert Appel Alzheimer’s Disease Institute Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Would you describe the process of making these neurons? Response: Primary tauopathies are a group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the pathological aggregation of 3R or 4R tau protein in neurons and/or glial cells, where 4R tauopathies are more common primary tauopathies. The exact pathological mechanisms remain elusive. There are currently no therapies available that can halt or reverse the spread of tau aggregates since the drug effects found in animal models are not always reproduced in human clinical trials. The development of tau therapies from human cells have become urgently needed. Induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer a unique model to better understand pathological mechanisms underlying human diseases and to develop human cell-based therapy. However, a major challenge to study 4R tauopathy is iPSC-derived neurons express very low levels of 4R Tau isoforms making it difficult to study 4R tauopathy and the mutations located in 4R Tau. To address this need, we designed and engineered a robust human iPSC 4R tauopathy model using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We first introduced specific mutations at the intron-exon 10 junctions and silent mutations within exon 10 to promote exon 10 inclusion, leading the increase of 4R isoforms expression in iPSC-derived neurons. Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) mutation, P301S located in exon 10 is highly aggregation prone. To generate this human disease 4R tauopathy model, we then introduced this mutation to 4R iPSC to make it a 4RP301S iPSC line. (more…)
Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, Mental Health Research, NIH / 19.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sharon Dekel PhD Principal Investigator Director of the Postpartum Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, 02114 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Maternal psychopathologies affect a significant number of American women and are the leading complications of childbirth and a significant contributor to maternal death. Maternal (physical) morbidity in the US remain the highest among all countries in the West, suggesting that some women will have a traumatic childbirth experience. The most common mental illness associated with trauma is posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD stemming from childbirth is estimated to affect 6% of delivering women (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28443054/). In high-risk groups, for example women who have unscheduled Cesareans the rate is estimated at 20% or higher (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31041603/.). Although we screen for postpartum depression in hospitals in the USA there is no screening for what we define as childbirth-related PTSD (CB-PTSD). The overarching goal of the Dekel Lab is to develop novel and patient-friendly screening tools to identify women with this disorder. As importantly traumatic childbirth disproportionality affects Black and Latina women (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35598158/). (more…)
Author Interviews, Autism, Nature, Pediatrics / 11.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Andrey Vyshedskiy, PhD Founder and CEO of ImagiRation LLC Neuroscientist, Boston University MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The common intuitive belief is that language comprehension development follows a linear trajectory: children acquire one grammatical rule at a time. Over 20 years ago, Dr. A. Vyshedskiy, predicted that instead of linear development, language should unfold in three steps corresponding to three language comprehension mechanisms of increasing complexity. The study of 31845 autistic individuals, published today in the journal npj Mental Health Research, validates this prediction. The implications of this discovery are reaching far and wide. The traditional definition of language is highly ambiguous. For some philosophers, “language” is equivalent to a “communication system.” Others argue that “language” must be defined more narrowly, in a way that is unique to humans. The results of the new study streamline terminology for describing different language comprehension mechanisms. The ensuing discussion of which language comprehension mechanisms are unique to humans and which are shared with other apes is expected to be most interesting. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, JAMA, UC Davis / 25.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Charles DeCarli, MD, FAAN, FAHA Victor and Genevieve Orsi Chair in Alzheimer's Research Distinguished Professor of Neurology Director, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and Imaging of Dementia and Aging (IDeA) Laboratory Department of Neurology and Center for Neuroscience University of California at Davis Sacramento, CA  95817   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The overall health of the U.S. population has improved dramatically over the last 100 years, Individuals are also living longer resulting in an increasing percentage of the population at risk for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD).  Recent data from the Framingham Heart study, however, finds that dementia incidence may be declining.  While many factors such as greater educational achievement and medical management of vascular risk factors may explain part of this effect, early life environmental differences also likely contribute. (more…)
Mental Health Research, Social Issues / 21.03.2024

dating-tirachard-kumtanom-450050Dating is a process in which you get to know another person. If you connect both emotionally and romantically, the relationship could become permanent. However, honesty is needed for this relationship to last. For some people, this might become an issue. If you have taken part in a residential mental health treatment program, should you share that with the other person? If so, when should this be done? The main thing to consider is when this level of intimacy is valued. Don't overshare on a first date, but don't wait until you have been in the relationship for a few years before sharing. When might this be? (more…)
ADHD, Author Interviews, Dermatology, JAMA, Mental Health Research / 08.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: DrJoy Wan M.D., M.S.C.E. Assistant Professor of Dermatology Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: There has been a growing body of literature linking atopic dermatitis with diagnoses such as ADHD and learning disabilities, but studies focusing on symptoms of cognitive impairment (in contrast to relying on reported diagnoses as proxy measures of such) have been fewer and demonstrate inconsistent findings. Thus, we were interested in using data from this nationally representative sample of U.S. children to examine whether atopic dermatitis was associated with symptoms of learning or memory difficulties. Moreover, we wanted to examine how this relationship is influenced by known neurodevelopmental conditions to further characterize whether specific subgroups of children with atopic dermatitis are more susceptible to cognitive impairments. (more…)
Mental Health Research / 07.03.2024

psychiatry-psychiatric-care-mentalhealthIn recent years, the field of psychiatric care has undergone a revolutionary transformation. This is because of groundbreaking research that has redefined our understanding of mental health and treatment methodologies. From innovative therapies to advanced diagnostic tools, transformative research has played a pivotal role in reshaping the landscape of psychiatric care. In this article, we will explore the key contributions that researchers have made in this field. We will also talk about how their work is influencing the way mental health is approached and treated. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cognitive Issues, COVID -19 Coronavirus, Imperial College, NEJM / 29.02.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Adam Hampshire Ph.D. Faculty of Medicine, Department of Brain Sciences Professor in Restorative Neurosciences Imperial College London MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Cognitive symptoms after coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), the disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), are well-recognized. Whether objectively measurable cognitive deficits exist and how long they persist are unclear. (more…)
Author Interviews, Memory / 14.02.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Frederic Meunier PhD Professor and Academic Senior Group/Unit Leader/Supervisor Queensland Brain Institute and Isaac O Akefe DVM, PhD Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research Queensland Brain Institute The University of Queensland St Lucia Academy for Medical Education, Medical School Brisbane QLD Australia     MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The brain is the body’s fattiest organ, with fatty compounds called lipids making up 60% of its weight. Fatty acids are the building blocks of a class of lipids called phospholipids. In our study, we first showed that levels of saturated fatty acids increase in the brain during neuronal communication and long-term memory formation, but we didn’t know what was causing these changes. (more…)
Aging, Mental Health Research / 31.01.2024

age-regressionAge regression stands as a captivating psychological occurrence that has piqued the curiosity of scholars, therapists, and individuals alike. It represents a state wherein adults briefly retreat to a more childlike mindset, marked by shifts in conduct, emotions, and cognitive processes. This article delves into the concept of age regression, its telltale signs, and the triggers and catalysts behind it. Are you or someone you know struggling with age regression and its effects on mental health? Don't walk this path alone. MentalHealth's dedicated professional service can help you understand and cope with age regression, providing you with the support and guidance you need to live life to the fullest. Contact them today to take the first step towards a healthier and happier lifestyle. (more…)
Author Interviews, Mental Health Research, Pharmaceutical Companies / 14.01.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Lauren Davis Lauren C. Davis, MBS Department of Medical Education Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Scranton, PA 19409   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Financial conflicts of interest (COIs) resulting from ties between academia and industry have been under scrutiny for their potential to hinder the integrity of medical research. COIs can lead to implicit bias, compromise the research process, and erode public trust (1-6). The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), standardizes symptom criteria and codifies psychiatric disorders. This manual contributes to the approval of new drugs, extensions of patent exclusivity, and can influence payers and mental health professionals seeking third-party reimbursements. Given the implications of the DSM on public health, it is paramount that it is free of industry influence. Previous research has shown a high prevalence of industry ties among panel and task force members of the DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5, despite the implementation of a disclosure policy for the DSM-5 (7,8). This study (9) determined the extent and type of COIs received by panel and task-force members of the DSM-5-TR (2022) (10). As the DSM-5-TR did not disclose COI, we used the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payments (OP) database (11) to quantify them. (more…)
Author Interviews, Brain Injury, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, Inflammation / 14.01.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Samir Mitragotri Ph.D. Hiller Professor of Bioengineering Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering Area Chair, Bioengineering Core Faculty Member, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering Harvard John A. Paulson School Of Engineering And Applied Sciences MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has a heavy burden on the world, affecting ~70 million people globally each year. Despite its prevalence, there are no clinically approved treatments beyond symptom management. There is an urgent need to develop effective therapies to alleviate the damage caused by TBI.   MedicalResearch.com:  What do macrophages typically do?  As part of the innate immune system, macrophages migrate to areas of injury to eat pathogens or debris and manage inflammation in response to injury or infection. However, in the majority of cases of TBI, there is no actual infection from a foreign pathogen, leading to excessive inflammation that spreads damage beyond the initial impact. (more…)
Author Interviews, Autism, JAMA, Pediatrics, Technology / 08.01.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Karen F. Heffler, MD Researcher, Autism Spectrum Disorder Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry Drexel University College of Medicine Philadelphia, PA MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? children-watching-tv-pexels-photo-4740522 Response: Atypical sensory processing is common in neurodevelopmental disorders, affecting approximately 60% of children with ADHD and up to 90% of children with autism. Sensory symptoms are associated with hyperactivity, restricted/repetitive behavior, irritability, behavioral problems, and emotional dysregulation. Sensory-related meltdowns and symptoms can be very disruptive to family-life, interfere with family participation in community events and are associated with increased caregiver stress. Prior to this study there was little understanding of potential risk factors for atypical sensory processing. The researchers used data from the National Children’s Study to determine the association between early-life screen time and sensory processing outcomes among toddlers. (more…)
Mental Health Research, Social Issues / 26.12.2023

In the fast-paced, interconnected world we now live in, the prevalence of burnout has become a concerning reality for many. The term was first coined in the 1970s to describe the chronic workplace stress that led to physical and emotional exhaustion. Since then, if you are feeling run down and exhausted you may well be yet another victim of modern-day fatigue. Here is a look at the nuances of burnout and some key factors contributing to this pervasive problem. Burnout goes beyond the workplace While burnout traditionally has its roots in a professional workplace setting, modern-day pressures means that the phenomenon now extends beyond the confines of the workplace. Burnout now encompasses a holistic exhaustion that permeates various aspects of life. These include personal relationships, social interactions, and even leisure activities. We have even reached a point where The World Health Organization (WHO) officially recognized burnout as a syndrome in the International Classification of Diseases, emphasizing its impact on overall well-being. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, Weight Research / 28.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Mahsa Dolatshahi, M.D., M.P.H. Post-doctoral research fellow Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (MIR) Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Obesity at midlife is recognized as a risk factor for developing Alzheimer disease decades afterwards. However, body mass index on its own does not adequately represent the risks associated with obesity. In this study, we went beyond BMI and considered anatomical distribution of body fat, including the metabolically active visceral fat in the belly, and showed its association with Alzheimer pathology in the form of amyloid proteins. In addition, visceral fat along with obesity and insulin resistance were associated with thinning of brain cortex, as early as midlife. (more…)
Author Interviews, Brain Injury / 16.11.2023

pexels-photo-7578808-medical-practitioner.webpIf you've been in a scrape and your noggin took a knock, playing it tough and shaking it off isn't the way to go. A traumatic brain injury (TBI), even one that seems no biggie, can be sneaky. At first, you might feel fine, but your brain's had a jolt, and it needs a look-over. Ignoring it? Bad move. That little headache or dizziness might be your brain's way of saying, "Hey, I'm not okay." Small signs like mood swings, sleep changes, or even just feeling "off" can be the early whispers of something bigger brewing. It's like ignoring a weird noise in your car's engine—let it go and you might just find yourself broken down on the highway of health.

The Domino Effect of Ignoring Symptoms

Let's talk about what happens if you shrug off those symptoms. A tiny injury can start a chain reaction. Before you know it, you could be dealing with big-time problems like memory issues, serious concentration hiccups, or even long-term disabilities. And here's the kicker: these troubles don't always show up on day one. They can sneak up on you, turning from "I'm fine" to "Why can't I remember my passwords?" in no time. Think about it—your brain runs the show, so even a small glitch can throw off the whole performance.
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Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, Genetic Research, JAMA, Stanford / 07.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Michael E. Belloy, PhD Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences Stanford University, Stanford, California MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Apolipoprotein E (APOE)*2 and APOE*4 are, respectively, the strongest protective and risk-increasing, genetic variants for late-onset Alzheimer disease. As such, one’s APOE genotype is highly relevant towards clinical trial design and Alzheimer’s disease research. However, most insights so far are focused on the associations of these APOE genotypes with Alzheimer’s disease risk in non-Hispanic white individuals. One important aspect of our work is that we really increased sample sizes for non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, and East Asian individuals, so that we now have better understanding of the associations of APOE genotypes with Alzheimer’s disease risk in these groups. In complement, we also did the largest investigation to date on the role of ancestry on the associations of APOE genotypes with Alzheimer’s disease risk. The scale of our study was thus a critical factor in generating novel insights. (more…)
Author Interviews, Environmental Risks, JAMA, McGill, Mental Health Research / 06.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Niki Hosseini-Kamkar PhD Postdoc, McGill University MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Our primary question was: Do adults with a history of childhood trauma have altered brain responses to psychological challenges? Previous evidence indicated that this can occur in laboratory animals, but it has been unclear whether it occurs in humans. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cognitive Issues, Nature, Pediatrics / 01.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Brenden Tervo-Clemmens, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain Scholar, Institute for Translational Neuroscience University of Minnesota MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response:      Both contemporary and historical theories of neurobehavioral development suggest executive functions (EF) mature through adolescence. These are often used in various contexts to try to demarcate the developmental boundaries of the adolescent period. However, the specific maturational timing of executive function, and the independence of various potential executive function subcomponents remain unknown. Building from prior investigations with relatively small datasets or narrow subsets of executive function measures, this work using four independent datasets (N>10,000) and 17 distinct executive function assessments provides a precise charting, multi-assessment investigation, and replication of executive function development from adolescence to adulthood. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cognitive Issues, Exercise - Fitness, JAMA / 01.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Peter A. Harmer, PhD, MPH, AT-Ret, FACSM Senior Associate Research Scientist Oregon Research Institute MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Decline in various aspects of cognitive function, such as memory, executive function, and multitasking ability is common as we age. The rate and extent of decline varies among older adults but approximately 20% of those aged 65+ will experience clinically relevant mild cognitive impairment, which places them at increased risk of progressing to Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias. It is also associated with decreased mobility, increased risk of falls and impaired capacity for complex activities of daily living. Research has shown that physical and mental activity may attenuate the decline and that combined physical/mental challenges may be more effective than either alone but up to this point there has been little quality clinical evidence. Building on previous successful studies with our established tai ji quan therapy, we developed a cognitively-enhanced training tai ji quan protocol to determine its effectiveness in enhancing global cognition and dual-task walking compared to our standard tai ji quan program and a stretching program in adults 65+ with mild cognitive impairment or self-reported memory concerns. (more…)