Directly Observed Therapy Linked To Lower Mortality In Multi-Drug Resistant TB

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Jorge Salinas MD
Epidemic intelligence service officer
Division of Tuberculosis Elimination
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Because multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) treatment regimens are less effective, more complex, and are more likely to have side effects that are difficult to tolerate than regimens for drug-susceptible TB, patients with MDR TB are at a higher risk of dying. Directly observed therapy (a therapy by which patients meet with a healthcare worker at a regularly scheduled time and place so the healthcare worker can observe the patient taking their TB medication) is recommended to treat all forms of TB disease, including MDR TB.

Continue reading

Could a Strep Throat Increase Risk of OCD?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sonja Orlovska MD, PhD student

Mental Health Centre Copenhagen
Denmark

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This Danish register-based study is the largest study so far investigating the hypothesis PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections) which describes a possible link between streptococcal throat infection and the subsequent development of OCD and tic disorders in children. PANDAS is in thread with research in mental health in recent years, suggesting that infections and immune activation might increase the risk of mental disorders.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Out of the 1,1 million individuals <18 years of age born in the study period, we found that the 349,982 individuals tested positive for a streptococcal throat infection by their GP had an increased risk of mental disorders by 18% and the risk of specifically OCD and tic disorders was increased with respectively 51% and 35%, compared to individuals who had never been tested. This seems to confirm PANDAS which speaks in favor of a specific link between strep throat and the development of OCD and tic disorders. However, we also found that non-streptococcal throat infection increased the risk of mental disorders, even though the risk of OCD and all mental disorders was larger after a strep throat. The study was performed at the Mental Health Centre Copenhagen together with Senior researcher Michael Eriksen Benros.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our results indicate that the brain might be affected by the immunological activation caused by a streptococcal infection possibly due to streptococcal antibodies cross-reacting with brain tissue causing psychiatric symptoms which is the theory of PANDAS. However, it seems as if the immunological response caused by other types of throat infections might also have a damaging effect in some individuals. Nevertheless, it cannot be ruled out that the results to some extent might be driven by a medical care-seeking behavior in some parents bringing their child to the GP more often in spite of only few symptoms of throat infection leading to testing for strep throat and also more frequent examination and diagnosis by a psychiatrist.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Even though our study supports some elements of the PANDAS hypothesis, more research is needed to fully confirm PANDAS. The research field would benefit from larger clinical studies following children with PANDAS over a longer period of time with frequent follow-ups in order to establish if streptococcal throat infections cause and worsen neuropsychiatric symptoms of OCD and tic disorders.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Orlovska S, Vestergaard CH, Bech BH, Nordentoft M, Vestergaard M, Benros ME. Association of Streptococcal Throat Infection With Mental DisordersTesting Key Aspects of the PANDAS Hypothesis in a Nationwide Study. JAMA Psychiatry. Published online May 24, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.0995

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

Injectable Cabotegravir Holds Promise as HIV Prevention Stategy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Martin Markowitz MD Clinical Director and Staff Investigator Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center Aaron Diamond Professor at The Rockefeller University

Dr. Markowitz

Martin Markowitz MD
Clinical Director and Staff Investigator
Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center
Aaron Diamond Professor at The Rockefeller University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Cabotegravir ((CAB) is an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase and is amenable to formulation in both oral and long acting injectable forms. In preclinical studies injectable CAB protected against low dose intrarectal challenge using an HIV-like virus in the rhesus macaque model.

These results support the clinical development of CAB as prevention. This study was a first attempt to establish a dosing regimen and evaluate safety and acceptability of intramuscular injections of CAB. The study was a placebo controlled blinded study of approximately 120 subjects with a 5:1 randomization active/placebo. Subjects received 800mg CAB given as 2 2mL injections or placebo every 12 weeks for 3 injections after a 4 week safety lead in of oral therapy. Safety acceptability and PK were assessed.

The main findings were that injections were associated with injection site reactions in the vast majority of participants that were mild to moderate and of short duration. Only 4 subjects who entered the injection phase discontinued due to injection intolerance. There were no additional safety signals and the participants considered the injections acceptable when asked to complete questionnaires. PK analysis found that despite modeling that suggested that the 800mg q 12 week dose would be adequate, this was not the case. More rapid uptake and release from the depot resulted in lower than anticipated drug levels at trough. Alternate dosing regimens are under study.

Another finding is that there were participants (14%) who had detectable drug in plasma detected at 52 weeks after last injection suggesting the presence of a tail in some individuals.

Continue reading

In Accordance With Guidelines, Fewer Low Risk Patients Receiving Antibiotics Before Dental Procedures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Daniel C. DeSimone, M.D.</strong> Infectious Diseases Fellowship, Year 2 Mayo Clinic

Dr. DeSimone

Daniel C. DeSimone, M.D.
Infectious Diseases Fellowship, Year 2
Mayo Clinic

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: For over 50 years, the American Heart Association (AHA) has recommended antibiotics to be given to patients with certain cardiac conditions prior to invasive dental procedures (dental cleanings, extractions, root canals) with the hope to prevent infective endocarditis–a potentially deadly infection of the heart valves. Prevention of this infection was preferred to treatment of an established infection due to its high morbidity and mortality rates. However, in 2007, experts found that there was very little, if any, evidence that showed antibiotics prophylaxis prevented infective endocarditis prior to invasive dental procedures. Given this, the AHA revised its guidelines, significant reducing the number of patients where antibiotic prophylaxis would be given–as routine daily activities such as chewing food, tooth brushing, and flossing were much more likely to cause infective endocarditis than a single dental procedure.

For over 50 years, patients with cardiac conditions that placed them at “moderate risk” and/or “high risk” were to receive antibiotics prior to dental procedures. In 2007, the “moderate risk” group were to no longer receive antibiotic prophylaxis. This is a significantly large proportion of patients–approximately 90% of all patients who would have received antibiotic prophylaxis. Given the drastic changes made in 2007, there was concern among the medical and dental communities about whether we were leaving patients “unprotected” and at risk for infective endocarditis. Thankfully, several population based studies from our group and others across the United States have not shown an increase in the rate of infective endocarditis. However, the question remained, “Are providers following the 2007 AHA guidelines?” and “Are patients still receiving antibiotics prior to dental procedures when its no longer indicated by the guidelines?”.

This was the main focus of our paper. We were able to go into the local dental offices and at the same time, have full access to their medical records. Every dental visit between 2005 and 2015 at their dental office was reviewed; the type of dental visit, whether they received antibiotic prophylaxis or not. In addition, we could confirm their cardiac conditions that would place them at “moderate risk” or “high risk” compared to the general population.

Continue reading

Antibiotic Failure in Community Acquired Pneumonia Surprisingly Common

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. James A. McKinnell, MD LA BioMed Assistant Professor of Medicine David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Dr. McKinnell

Dr. James A. McKinnell, MD
LA BioMed
Assistant Professor of Medicine
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Pneumonia is the leading cause of death from infectious disease in the United States. We conducted this study because current community-acquired pneumonia guidelines from the American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Disease Society America, published in 2007, provide some direction about prescribing antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia. But large-scale, real-world data are needed to better understand and optimize antibiotic choices and to better define clinical risk factors that may be associated with treatment failure. Antibiotic failure for community-acquired pneumonia is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality and results in significant medical expenditures.

We examined databases containing records for 251,947 adult patients who were treated between 2011 and 2015 with a single class of antibiotics (beta-lactam, macrolide, tetracycline, or fluoroquinolone) following a visit to their physician for treatment for community-acquired pneumonia. We defined treatment failure as either the need to refill antibiotic prescriptions, antibiotic switch, ER visit or hospitalization within 30 days of receipt of the initial antibiotic prescription.

Continue reading

Synthetic Human Angiotensin II for the Treatment of Vasodilatory Shock

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ashish Khanna, MD, FCCP Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine Staff Intensivist Center for Critical Care and Department of Outcomes Research Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland

Dr. Khanna

Ashish Khanna, MD, FCCP
Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine
Staff Intensivist
Center for Critical Care and Department of Outcomes Research
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland

MedicalResearch.com: How did you become interested in this topic?

Response: Anesthesia forms the basis of my training but I also completed a fellowship in critical care and, at the present time, I do more work in critical care than anesthesia. About 75% of my time is spent in the Cleveland Clinic critical care units, including the Medical and surgical ICUs (Intensive Care Units).

Continue reading

Rory’s Regulations: Faster Is Better When It Comes To Sepsis Care

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Christopher W. Seymour, M.D., M.Sc. Assistant professor of Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine, and member of Clinical Research Investigation and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Seymour

Christopher W. Seymour, M.D., M.Sc.
Assistant professor of Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine, and member of Clinical Research Investigation and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness
University of Pittsburgh

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Following the tragic and widely publicized death of Rory Staunton, 12, from undiagnosed sepsis in 2012, New York became the first state to require that hospitals follow a protocol to quickly identify and treat the condition. The mandate led to widespread controversy in the medical community as to whether such steps would have saved Rory or anyone else’s life.

Rory’s Regulations require hospitals to follow protocols for early identification and treatment of sepsis, and submit data on compliance and outcomes. The hospitals can tailor how they implement the protocols, but must include a blood culture to test for infection, measurement of blood lactate (a sign of tissue stress) and administration of antibiotics within three hours of diagnosis—collectively known as the “three-hour bundle.”

We analyzed data from nearly 50,000 patients from 149 New York hospitals to scientifically determine if  Rory’s Regulations worked. We found that they did – 83 percent of the hospitals completed the bundle within the required three hours, overall averaging 1.3 hours for completion. For every hour that it took clinicians to complete the bundle, the odds of the patient dying increased by 4 percent.

Continue reading

EHRs Can Facilitate Rapid Detection and Treatment of Sepsis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Faheem Guirgis MD  Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine Department of Emergency Medicine Division of Research UF Health Jacksonville

Dr. Guirgis

Faheem Guirgis MD
Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Department of Emergency Medicine
Division of Research
UF Health Jacksonville

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Sepsis is quite prevalent among hospitals and the incidence is increasing. It is a life-threatening disease that can lead to poor outcomes if patients are not recognized and treated promptly. We recognized that our institution needed a strategic approach to the problem of sepsis, therefore the Sepsis Committee was created with the goal of creating a comprehensive sepsis program.

We developed a system for sepsis recognition and rapid care delivery that would work in any area of the hospital. We found that we reduced overall mortality from sepsis, the number of patients requiring mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit length and overall hospital length of stay, and the charges to the patient by approximately $7000 per patient.

Continue reading

Toward A Real Cure for HIV: Abivax’s ABX464 Reduced HIV Reservoir in Phase 2 Trial

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
AbivaxJean-Marc Steens, M.D.

Chief Medical Officer of Abivax

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has had an enormous impact on the HIV pandemic since its introduction almost 20 years ago. Most patients treated with ART achieve undetectable or near undetectable plasma levels of the virus. This means that although HIV is controlled, it is not completely eliminated. The virus remains in the body, usually contained in dormant cells (known as the HIV reservoir) that are widely distributed, including to the central nervous system, the gut mucosa, the lymph nodes and other sites. If ART is stopped, the virus rebounds. The goal of any curative therapy would be to eliminate the virus or ensure there is sustained remission in the absence of ART, which until now have been unsuccessful.

Abivax’s Phase 2 clinical study with ABX464 demonstrated, for the first time, a reduction in HIV reservoirs in chronically infected HIV patients as measured by total HIV DNA detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).

In the ABX464-004 trial, 30 HIV patients received either ABX464 or matching placebo in addition to their current antiretroviral treatment over 28 days. The viral load at the start of the study was well controlled with boosted darunavir. After the 28-day treatment period, all treatments were interrupted until viral load rebound. Baseline and day 28 blood samples were taken to assess the potential effect of ABX464 on the HIV reservoir in PBMCs.

Safety was the primary endpoint in the trial. ABX464 was well tolerated, with no severe adverse events in the treatment group. Amongst evaluable patients (4 placebo and 14 ABX464-treated patients), a reduction in viral DNA copies/mPBMCs was observed in 7/14 treated patients (mean change of -40%, ranging from -27% to -67%) and no responders were observed in the placebo group. Responders were defined as patients who had a decrease greater than 25% in total HIV DNA in PBMCs and a reduction of at least 50 copies.

Total HIV DNA in PBMC has been validated as a widely accepted biomarker for measuring the HIV reservoir. Specifically, in untreated patients, total HIV DNA load influences the course of the infection and is therefore clinically relevant. In addition, a correlation exists between the pool of HIV-1 DNA and the replication-competent reservoir.

Continue reading

PaxVax Commences Trial to Modernize Adenovirus Vaccine

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Nima Farzan Chief Executive Officer & President of PaxVax

Nima Farzan

Nima Farzan
Chief Executive Officer & President of PaxVax

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: PaxVax is developing a new and improved version of the vaccine, known as the Modernized Production Adenovirus Vaccine (MPAV) Prototype A. The Company was chosen as the Small Business Innovation Research and Regulatory Sponsor for the development of the Modernized Production Adenovirus Vaccine (MPAV) Prototype A due to the company’s prior experience working with multiple strains of Adenovirus. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for MPACV was submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on January 30, 2017. The Phase I clinical trial has been initiated and will be conducted at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. PaxVax expects to see results of the Phase I clinical trial in early 2018.

Complications of adenovirus 4/7 can include headache, pneumonia, sore throat and eye infections. In severe cases, adenovirus can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome and other serious complications related to organ system damage (including GI tract and bladder) that can result in death, if left untreated.

Continue reading

New Drug May Protect Gut From Antibiotic-Resistance Genes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

Sheila Connelly, PhD
Vice President, Research
Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Synthetic Biologics, Inc. is focused on the protection and preservation of the gut microbiome which is the diverse collection of microorganisms that live in the intestinal tract. We are learning that the gut microbiome plays a key role in health. Negative changes to the microbiome, called dysbiosis, are linked to disease states including allergies, autism, and obesity, among a rapidly growing list of other conditions. A consequence of using antibiotics is that, in addition to fighting the bacterial infection being treated, they also kill the gut microbiota. The space left in the gut by the dead bacteria allows other surviving bacteria, many times opportunistic pathogens or microbes that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, to overgrow and fill the open niches. Exposure to antibiotics, particularly broad-spectrum antimicrobials, such as penicillins and cephalosporins, is a major risk factor for acquiring a potentially deadly Clostridium difficile infection.

Dr-Sheila-Connelly.jpg

Dr. Sheila Connelly

Another consequence of antibiotic use is the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Widespread use of antibiotics provides selective pressure for the evolution of lethal, multi-drug resistant pathogens, termed “nightmare bacteria”. The gut microbiome acts as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance that can be triggered, by antibiotic exposure, to acquire and propagate resistance genes.

A way to protect the microbiome and reduce antibiotic resistance is to limit exposure of the gut microbiota to antibiotics. To this end, we developed an antibiotic inactivation strategy using a beta-lactamase enzyme to degrade beta-lactam antibiotics in the GI tract before they can harm the gut microbiome. Beta-lactamases are naturally-occurring bacterial enzymes that confer resistance to beta-lactams, the most widely used broad spectrum antibiotics, and their presence is normally considered an obstacle to efficacious infection control. We took advantage of the highly efficient antibiotic degradation activity of a beta-lactamase and developed SYN-004 (ribaxamase). Ribaxamase is a beta-lactamase engineered to inactivate penicillins and most cephalosporins, formulated for oral delivery, and intended for use with IV beta-lactam antibiotics to degrade the antibiotics in the GI tract to protect the microbiome.

Ribaxamase was demonstrated to significantly reduce the occurrence of C. difficile disease in a recently completed Phase 2b clinical study. The study met its primary endpoint by demonstrating that ribaxamase, when delivered orally with IV ceftriaxone, significantly reduced C. difficile disease in patients treated for a respiratory tract infection. Ribaxamase also resulted in a significant reduction in new colonization by vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE).

For the current study, pig models of antibiotic-mediated gut dysbiosis were established using three classes of beta-lactam antibiotics, a cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, a penicillin, amoxicillin, and a carbapenem, ertapenem. The ceftriaxone model was used to evaluate the protective effect of ribaxamase on the microbiome and the amoxicillin and ertapenem models are intended for evaluation of pipeline products.

Continue reading

Phase 2 Trial of Takeda’s Dengue Vaccine Demonstrates Immune Response Against All 4 Strains

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Vianney Tricou DPhil Takeda Vaccines Singapore

Dr. Vianney Tricou

Dr Vianney Tricou DPhil
Takeda Vaccines
Singapore

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Dengue fever is a painful, debilitating mosquito-borne disease caused by any one of four closely related dengue virus serotypes, and persons living in dengue endemic regions may be affected by dengue more than once in their lifetime. Some individuals with dengue fever are hospitalized and may need intensive therapy to prevent shock and death, and severe dengue is a leading cause of hospitalization and death among children and adults in some Asian and Latin American countries. About half of the world’s population lives under the threat of dengue and the disease has a significant medical and economic impact in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world where dengue is endemic.

Takeda is committed to improving global public health and to developing a life-saving dengue vaccine candidate for people around the world. Takeda’s tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TAK-003) is based on a live-attenuated dengue serotype 2 virus (DENV-2), which provides the genetic ‘backbone’ for all four attenuated dengue virus serotypes present in the vaccine. Takeda’s Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical study program includes 8 studies to date that assess the safety and/or immunogenicity of this candidate, before moving into Phase 3.

Takeda’s ongoing Phase 2 DEN-204 study is designed to assess the safety and immunogenicity of one- and two-dose schedules of TAK-003 in 1,794 healthy children and adolescents ages two through 17 years living in dengue-endemic countries in Latin America and Asia.

As published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases in March 2017, an interim analysis of DEN-204 data indicated that TAK-003 elicited antibody responses to all four dengue serotypes in the population studied, regardless of whether they had previous dengue exposure.

A second TDV dose improved antibody responses against DENV-3 and DENV-4 in children who were seronegative before vaccination. In this study, the safety profile was consistent with that observed in earlier Phase 1 and 2 studies.
Continue reading