Could Vaccine Against Meningococcus Help Protect Against Gonorrhea?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Helen Petousis-Harris. BSc, PhD

Senior Lecturer, Dept General Practice and Primary Health Care
Academic Head, Immunisation Research and Vaccinology
Immunisation Advisory Centre
School of Population Health, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences
University of Auckland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Early thinking came from two quarters. One, the observation that the NZ OMV vaccine appeared broadly protective – beyond the clone it was based on and two, the observation of graphs depicting annual number of cases from both Cuba and NZ. There is nothing to suggest other types of meningococcal vaccine have had any effect on gonorrhoea so we are interested in the OMV vaccines. This led to the hypothesis that as these two Neisseria species are related the meningococcal OMV in the form of a vaccine may offer some kind of cross protection.

To explore this possibility we conducted a case-control study that compared the vaccination status of cases (gonorrhoea) and controls (Clamydia). We found that the cases with gonorrhoea were less likely to be vaccinated than the controls and after we controlled for confounders – ethnicity, SE deprivation, age we found a vaccine effectiveness of 31%.

Continue reading

Frequent Cause of Infertility, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, Often Goes Unrecognized

Dr. Kirsten Kreise

Dr. Kristen Kreisel

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Kristen Kreisel PhD
Epidemiologist at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of the female reproductive tract often associated with STDs, is putting millions of women at risk for infertility, ectopic pregnancy and chronic pelvic pain. Our study looked at data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to estimate the national burden of PID. Findings show an estimated 4.4 percent of sexually-experienced women aged 18-44, or approximately 2.5 million woman nationwide reported a history of PID.

Continue reading

Does HAART Treatment for HIV Contribute To Rapid Rise in Syphilis Infections?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michael Rekart, MD, DTM&H Clinical Professor, Medicine and Global Health The University of British Columbia .... On behalf of my co-authors

Dr. Michael Rekart

Michael Rekart, MD, DTM&H
Clinical Professor, Medicine and Global Health
The University of British Columbia
…. On behalf of my co-authors

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The background for this study is the observation that new syphilis cases over the last decade in British Columbia, Canada, have been escalating more rapidly than anyone could have predicted and that syphilis incidence has outpaced the incidence of other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including gonorrhea and chlamydia. This unexpected increase in syphilis has been almost wholly concentrated in men who have sex with men (MSM). Most of these MSM are HIV-1 infected and many are taking highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In fact, the expansion in HAART coverage in MSM parallels the growth in syphilis in the same population. In addition, my co-authors and I had serious doubts as to whether ‘treatment optimism’, the generally accepted explanation for this phenomenon, was robust enough to account for such a dramatic increase in new syphilis cases. Treatment optimism posits that HAART availability and effectiveness have led to the perception in both HIV-1-infected and HIV-1-uninfected individuals that HIV-1 transmission has become much less likely, and the effects of HIV-1 infection less deadly. This is expected to result in increased sexual risk-taking, especially unprotected anal intercourse, leading to more non-HIV-1 STDs, including gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis.

Continue reading

Pubic Hair Grooming Linked To Increased Risk of STDs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

E. Charles Osterberg, M.D. Assistant Professor of Surgery Genitourinary Reconstruction and Trauma University of Texas- Dell Medical School Dell-Seton Medical Center / University Hospital

Dr. Osterberg

E. Charles Osterberg, M.D.
Assistant Professor of Surgery
Genitourinary Reconstruction and Trauma
University of Texas- Dell Medical School
Dell-Seton Medical Center / University Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Pubic hair grooming has become an increasingly common practice among men and women. Perceptions of genital normalcy have changed as modern society’s definition of attractiveness and feelings of femininity and masculinity have changed. Pubic hair grooming has been shown to increase morbidity such as genital injuries, however little is known about the relationship between grooming practices and sexually transmitted infections.

Continue reading

Syphilis Skyrockets Among MSM

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alex de Voux, PhD, Epidemiologist Centers for Disease Control Division of STD Prevention

Dr. Alex de Voux

Alex de Voux, PhD, Epidemiologist
Centers for Disease Control
Division of STD Prevention

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis have been increasing steadily in the United States since 2001, with men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) accounting for 83% of male primary and secondary syphilis cases with information on sex of sex partner in 2014.

However calculating the true disparity of primary and secondary syphilis cases relative to the MSM population size has been difficult because census data does not routinely collect information on sexual orientation or same-sex behavior. Through a recent collaboration with Emory University and CDC, Grey and colleagues developed refined estimates of the population size of MSM by state allowing us to calculate state-specific rates of primary and secondary syphilis for the first time. Looking at data from 44 states that had information on sex of sex partner for at least 70% of their male primary and secondary syphilis cases, the overall rate of syphilis was 309 per 100,000.

The state level data found syphilis rates among gay and bisexual men ranged widely among the 44 states, from 73.1 per 100,000 in Alaska to 748.3 per 100,000 in North Carolina. Some of the highest rates among MSM were in states in the Southeast and the West.

Comparing rates of syphilis among MSM to men reporting sex with women only (MSW), the overall rate for MSM was 107 times the rate for MSW. By state, the rate among MSM was at least 40 times the rate among MSW – and at most, 340 times the rate among MSW.

Continue reading

Meta-analysis finds that pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis for prevention of HIV infection may be associated with an increase in STDs among MSM

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Noah Kojima

David Geffen School of Medicine
University of California
Los Angeles, California

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: One of the most exciting new methods to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection is through the use of chemical pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which has been shown to be safe and effective in randomized-controlled trials and “real world” studies among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, reports of high incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and condomless sex in PrEP trials has led clinicians and public health advocates to be concerned that the use of PrEP for HIV might lead to higher STI incidence due to increased sexual risk behavior. We found that PrEP for HIV infection is associated with increased risk of STI acquisition among MSM in a meta-analysis of prior studies.

Continue reading

Almost A Million Cases of Maternal Syphilis Globally Per year

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

N. Saman Wijesooriya Public Health Advisor/Technical Advisor Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

N. Saman Wijesooriya

N. Saman Wijesooriya
Public Health Advisor/Technical Advisor
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The article Global burden of maternal and congenital syphilis in 2008 and 2012: a health systems modeling study by Wijesooriya, et al published in the August 2016 issue of The Lancet Global Health (Open source – http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(16)30135-8) estimates the incidence and prevalence of maternal and congenital syphilis for both time periods and identifies gaps antenatal care access and syphilis testing and treatment services to assess progress in the global elimination of congenital syphilis, or mother-to-child transmission of syphilis, as a public health problem.

Untreated maternal syphilis is understood to be transmitted from mother-to-child in utero in 50% of cases resulting in tragic adverse pregnancy outcomes, or congenital syphilis infections, including early fetal death, stillbirth, preterm birth, low birthweight, neonatal death, and congenital infections in infants. Since most maternal syphilis infections are asymptomatic, it is recommended that screening for syphilis use a combination of serological tests for pregnant women and treatment of syphilis seropositive women with at least 2.4 million units of benzathine penicillin intramuscularly early in pregnancy to prevent most congenital syphilis infections.

In 2007, the World Health Organization responded to estimates indicating 2 million maternal and 1.5 congenital syphilis infections would occur annually without treatment and launched the global initiative for the Elimination of Congenital Syphilis (ECS). The strategy includes reducing the prevalence of syphilis in pregnant women and mother-to-child transmission of syphilis. The objective is for countries to achieve high performing antenatal care systems providing access to antenatal care to more than 95% of pregnant women, syphilis testing for more than 95% of pregnant women, and treatment for more than 95% of seropositive women to attain a congenital syphilis rate of 50 or fewer cases per 100,000 live births.

Continue reading

Co-infection with HPV and Chlamydia Can Be Asymptomatic and Lead to Infertility

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dejan R. Nonato, MD, PhD Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health School of Medicine Federal University of Goiás Goiânia, GO, Brazil

Dr. Dejan Nonato

Dejan R. Nonato, MD, PhD
Institute of Tropical Pathology and Public Health
School of Medicine
Federal University of Goiás
Goiânia, GO, Brazil

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) share the same route of sexual transmission and possess similar risk factors, indicating that co-infection may act synergistically in the induction of epithelial cell abnormalities.

Continue reading

European CDC Reports Doubling in Number of Gonorrhea Cases

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Andrew Amato-Gauci MD Head of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control Programme on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections and viral hepatitis

Dr. Andrew Amato Gauci

Dr. Andrew Amato-Gauci MD
Head of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control
Programme on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections and viral hepatitis

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Our surveillance data (http://bit.ly/1sXdbVv) show that between 2008 and 2014, the overall rate of officially reported gonorrhoea infections has more than doubled across Europe, going up from 8 per 100 000 population to 20 cases per 100 000 persons.

In total, 66 413 gonorrhoea cases were reported in 27 countries of the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) in 2014 – which constitutes an increase of 25% compared with 2013. The majority of gonorrhoea infections were diagnosed among young adults aged 15–24 years who accounted for 38% of cases; followed by the 25–34-year-olds (34%).

For the first time since 2010, the number of cases among women was higher than the number of cases among heterosexual men. Given the risk of reproductive tract complications, e.g. pelvic inflammatory disease or, if untreated, infertility, as well as possible transmission from mother to child, this trend among women is of particular concern.

Continue reading

Estradiol May Increase Resistance To Sexually Transmitted Diseases

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Charu Kaushic. PhD. Professor OHTN Applied HIV Research Chair Department of Pathology and Mol. Medicine McMaster Immunology Research Center, McMaster University

Dr. Charu Kaushic

Charu Kaushic. PhD.
Professor
OHTN Applied HIV Research Chair
Department of Pathology and Mol. Medicine
McMaster Immunology Research Center,
McMaster University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Kaushic: Female sex hormones, estradiol and progesterone have been shown to regulate immune responses in many experimental and clinical studies. We and others have shown previously that these hormones also regulate susceptibility to and outcome of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including Chlamydia, HSV-2, SIV and HIV-1. Most studies show that progesterone generally increases susceptibility while estradiol generally confers protection against STIs. This has recently gained much more widespread attention because of the controversy surrounding use of injectable hormonal contraceptives in geographical areas where there is high prevalence of HIV-1. The most frequently used injectable contraceptive uses a progestin-based formulation which has been correlated with 2-fold increase in HIV acquisition and transmission in epidemiological studies. Oral contraceptives that contain a combination of estradiol and progesterone do not show similar correlation with increased infection. This is currently a very important women’s health issue, which is being carefully monitored by many public health agencies, including WHO. Many researchers are focusing efforts in understanding how sex hormones can increase or decrease susceptibility of women to STIs.

We have published in this area for more than a decade, including a series of papers showing that in a mouse model, the outcome of genital herpes (HSV-2) infection can depend on which hormone we treat the mice with. A few years ago, we showed for the first time that mice that received an HSV-2 vaccine under the influence of estradiol were much better protected and showed less disease pathology (Bhavanam et al, Vaccine 2008). These results were reproduced a year later by another group, using an actual HSV-2 vaccine formulation. Since then, we have been working to understand at a cellular level, the underlying mechanism of estradiol-mediated enhanced protection. In this PLOS Pathogens paper, we report for the first time a cellular mechanism by which estradiol was seen to enhance immune protection against HSV-2 infection in mice.

The main findings are that estradiol primes dendritic cells in the vaginal tract to induce enhanced anti-viral T cell responses. Dendritic cells are key immune cells that decide what type of immune responses will be mounted against an infection. Under the influence of estradiol, the dendritic cells in the vaginal tract of mice induced Th17 cells which in turn helped enhance anti-viral T cell responses (Th1), resulting in better protection against genital HSV-2. This regulation of anti-viral immunity was seen only in the reproductive tract.

Continue reading

High School Girls Using Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Less Likely To Use Condoms

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Riley Steiner MPH Epidemiologist in the Division of Adolescent and School Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Riley Steiner

Riley Steiner MPH
Epidemiologist in the Division of Adolescent and School Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Using data from the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), our analysis looks at differences in condom use and other sexual risk behaviors among users of a variety of contraceptive methods. We found that sexually active high school females using long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) are less likely to use condoms when compared to those using oral contraceptives.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: The findings highlight a need to increase condom use among all users of highly and moderately effective contraceptive methods (LARC, Depo-Provera, patch, ring, or oral contraceptives) to prevent STDs. As LARC use increases among adolescents, we need to remind teens that  long-acting reversible contraception methods do not protect against STIs and that condoms should also be used for STI prevention. Health care professionals can help adolescents develop strategies for correct and consistent condom use for STI prevention in addition to helping adolescents choose the contraceptive method that works best for them to prevent unintended pregnancy. To ensure this happens, providers need training and tools to effectively address both pregnancy and STI prevention within the same clinical visit.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Research is needed to improve our understanding of the motivations for condom use among adolescents using highly or moderately effective contraceptive methods, as well as provider perceptions and recommendation of LARC for adolescents. Such data will help to explain why adolescent long-acting reversible contraception users may be less likely to use condoms compared to oral contraceptive users. Additionally, we need to continue to monitor the rates at which condoms are used alongside other contraceptive options. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: The findings should not deter adolescent  long-acting reversible contraception use but rather inform how STI prevention is addressed as LARC use increases among adolescents. 

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Steiner RJ, Liddon N, Swartzendruber AL, Rasberry CN, Sales JM. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception and Condom Use Among Female US High School Students: Implications for Sexually Transmitted Infection Prevention. JAMA Pediatr.Published online March 14, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0007.

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

 

 

Mycoplasma genitalium, a Sexually Transmitted Infection, identified in 1% of the British population

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Pam Sonnenberg 

Reader in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Research Department of Infection & Population Health
University College London
London

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Sonnenberg:  This study strengthens growing evidence that Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Analyses of over 4500 of urine samples from Britain’s third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) showed that MG was prevalent in up to 1% of the general population aged 16-44, who had reported at least one sexual partner. Prevalence was much higher in those who had reported more than four sexual partners in the past year – 5.2% in men and 3.1% in women. Absence of the infection in over 200 16-17 year olds who had not had vaginal, anal, or oral sex provided further evidence that MG is transmitted sexually. The study also analysed risk factors for  Mycoplasma genitalium, such as ethnicity, number of partners, and areas of deprivation. There were strong associations with risky sexual behaviours, with similar behavioural risk factors to other known STIs. The authors found that men of Black ethnicity and those living in the most deprived areas were more likely to test positive for MG. Over 90% of Mycoplasma genitalium in men and over two-thirds of MG cases in women were in those aged 25–44 years; an age group who would not be included in STI prevention measures currently aimed at young people in Britain. Interestingly, the majority of participants who tested positive for MG did not report any STI symptoms in the last month. Over half of women did not report any symptoms, but among those who did, bleeding after sex was most common. Over 90% of MG positive men did not report any symptoms.

Continue reading

Number of Babies Born With Syphilis Rises Sharply

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Virginia Bowen PhD
Epidemic Intelligence Service
Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention,CDC 

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Bowen: Congenital syphilis (CS) occurs when a mother infected with syphilis transmits the infection to her child during the course of pregnancy. Our study looked at recent trends in CS between 2008 and 2014. After four years of decline, Congenital syphilis rates increased by 38% from 2012 to 2014.

The findings from this report show we are missing opportunities to screen and treat pregnant women for STDs. Syphilis in pregnant women can cause miscarriages, premature births, stillbirths, or death of newborn babies. We have effective tests and treatment for syphilis – there’s no excuse for allowing it to resurge. Every case of CS is one too many.

Continue reading

Bacterial STD Linked to Increased Risk of HIV

Newswise — 3/9/2012  — A common sexually transmitted bacterial infection more than doubles the risk of HIV infection in African women, according to a study by researchers at RTI International.

The study, published in the March 13 issue of AIDS, found that women with the “emerging” sexually transmitted disease Mycoplasma genitalium are more likely to acquire HIV infection.

“Further research will be required to confirm a causal relationship and to identify risk factors for M. genitaliuminfection in African populations,” said Sue Napierala Mavedzenge, Ph.D., a research investigator with theWomen’s Global Health Imperative at RTI International and the study’s lead author. “If findings from this research are confirmed, M. genitalium screening and treatment among women at high risk for HIV-1 infection may be warranted as part of an HIV-1 prevention strategy.”

First discovered in 1980, M. genitalium is a bacterial STD that causes inflammatory conditions of the genitals and reproductive tract (urethritis, cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease). The infection, which may be present for years without causing any symptoms, can be eliminated with appropriate antibiotics.

This study used data from a larger study of HIV acquisition among young women in Zimbabwe and Uganda to assess the effects of M. genitalium on HIV risk. In the study, 190 women who became infected with HIV during follow-up were matched to women of similar age and risk who did not acquire HIV. Both groups were tested for the presence of M. genitalium, which was evaluated as a risk factor for HIV infection.

In initial samples, when all women were HIV free, infection with M. genitalium was present in about 15 percent of women who later developed HIV versus 6.5 percent in women who remained HIV free. Mycoplasma genitalium was more frequent than other bacterial STDs, including gonorrhea and chlamydia.

The researchers found that after adjustment for other factors, women who initially had M. genitalium were more than twice as likely to become infected with HIV. Certain other STDs were also risk factors for HIV.

The researchers estimated that about 9 percent of all HIV infections occurring in the study were attributable to M. genitalium. However, other factors were more strongly associated with HIV risk, especially the presence of herpes simplex virus 2 (the virus that causes genital herpes) and having a partner with HIV risk factors.