Dermatology / 03.07.2024

home-remedies-eczemaEczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic skin condition characterized by dry, itchy, and inflamed skin. While there are various treatments available, many people turn to home remedies to manage their symptoms. In this article,  several natural remedies for eczema are explored, some remedies that should be avoided are discussed and tips for treating eczema in babies and children are identified.

Natural Remedies for Eczema

Home natural remedy for eczema may provide significant relief and improve the condition of the skin. Colloidal oatmeal, for instance, is renowned for its soothing properties, helping to alleviate itching and irritation. Simply adding it to a warm bath can create a calming treatment. Another effective remedy is coconut oil, which hydrates the skin and may contain antibacterial properties that help prevent infection. Applying it directly to affected areas twice daily may make a noticeable difference. Additionally, sunflower seed oil may strengthen the skin barrier and reduce inflammation when used as a moisturizer. Bleach baths, although sounding harsh, may reduce bacteria on the skin and are beneficial when used sparingly. Lastly, using a cool compress can provide immediate relief from severe itching and inflammation. These natural remedies are gentle yet effective ways to manage eczema symptoms and enhance overall skin health. Contact a healthcare professional before using any natural remedy. They can help ensure the remedy fits safely within a treatment plan. Remember allergic reactions can occur or develop to any product so be sure to monitor your skin for any new or unexpected reactions. Test any new product on a small area before applying to larger areas. (more…)
Dermatology / 02.07.2024

Want to achieve that radiant, healthy glow? You’re in the right place. In this guide, we’re sharing five essential dermatology tips, straight from the experts, to help you get the skin of your dreams. From the best skincare routines to insider secrets on keeping your skin youthful and vibrant, we’ve got you covered. 

1. Sunscreen: Your Skin’s Best Friend

skincare_pexels-karolina-grabowska-4210657I can’t stress this enough - sunscreen is a must! Here’s why:
  • Protects against harmful UV rays
  • Prevents premature aging
  • Reduces risk of skin cancer
Dr. Shari Lipner from Weill Cornell Medicine says, “The single most important tip for healthy, glowing skin is to apply a broad spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher every single day”. Pro tip: Don’t forget often-missed spots like your ears, neck, and the backs of your hands! (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, JAMA, Salt-Sodium / 12.06.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Katrina Abuabara, MD, MA, MSCE Associate Professor of Dermatology, UCSF Associate Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology UC Berkeley School of Public Health MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Eczema (also known as atopic dermatitis) has become increasingly common over recent decades, especially in industrialized countries, suggesting that environmental or lifestyle factors like diet could impact rates of disease. It is well established that sodium, consumed primarily in the form of salt, increases the risk of hypertension and heart disease through pro-inflammatory mechanisms. The role of sodium on other chronic inflammatory conditions like eczema has been less well-studied. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Melanoma, Race/Ethnic Diversity / 24.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Andrew F. Alexis, MD, MPH Vice-Chair for Diversity and Inclusion Department of Dermatology Dermatologist Center for Diverse Skin Complexions Weill Cornell Medicine – NY MedicalResearch.com: What are the main types of skin cancer?  Is the incidence changing? Response: The 3 main types of skin cancer are melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States1 and 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. (2) The overall incidence has changed as follows:Melanoma: Rates doubled over past 30 years from 1982 to 2011.3 It differs by age group. o Adolescents and adults age 30 and younger: incidence rate is declining o Older age groups (e.g. 80 and older): incidence rate is increasing • Squamous Cell Cancer: o Incidence increased 263% between 1976-1984 and 2000-20104 • Basal Cell Cancer: o Incidence increased 145% between 1976-1984 and 2000-20104 (more…)
Dermatology / 17.05.2024

Our skin is subject to a multitude of internal and external influences that can affect its thickness and texture over time. Factors such as aging, environmental aggressors, lifestyle choices, and genetics can contribute to the gradual thinning and deterioration of skin quality. However, the good news is that there are various approaches to address these concerns and promote the restoration of skin thickness and texture. In this article, we'll explore a few crucial factors that, according to research, play pivotal roles in this rejuvenation process.

The Proliferation and Migration of Skin Cells

skin-care-dermatologyAccording to the National Institutes of Health, at the core of skin thickness and texture restoration lies the process of cell proliferation and migration. The epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin, constantly undergoes renewal through a process known as epidermal turnover. Stem cells within the basal layer of the epidermis divide and differentiate into keratinocytes. These gradually migrate upward to the skin's surface, replacing old, damaged cells. According to Beyond CellCare, stem cell therapy differs from traditional treatments, which only target the symptoms of skin aging. By fostering cellular repair and renewal, it targets the fundamental mechanisms of aging. Furthermore, certain skincare ingredients and treatments, such as chemical exfoliants and professional procedures like microdermabrasion and chemical peels, can accelerate cell turnover. You’ll also find the use of exosome injection and similar therapy methods involving exosomes becoming popular in this regard. Exosomes facilitate skin cell proliferation and migration by transferring growth factors and signaling molecules. (Please note that exosomes are currently not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat or diagnose any disease). (more…)
Dermatology / 04.05.2024

Key Takeaways:
  • Understanding the groundbreaking science behind laser facial hair removal and its multifaceted benefits.
  • Key steps to consider in preparation for a laser hair removal session to ensure safety and effectiveness.
  • Essential post-treatment care strategies to enhance results and maintain skin health after the procedure.
  • The role of continuous technological advancements in improving laser hair removal treatments.
What Is Laser Hair Removal and How Does It Work? face-hair-hairremovalLaser hair removal is a long-lasting alternative to traditional hair removal methods for unwanted facial hair in both men and women. Laser treatments disrupt the normal growth cycle of hair follicles by utilizing highly concentrated beams of light designed to be absorbed by the pigment within the hair shafts. This state-of-the-art technique has quickly found favor in metropolises like Chicago, where grooming and self-care are highly prioritized. Laser facial hair removal in Chicago is primarily sought for its ability to facilitate a seamless, hair-free complexion, symbolic of the city's cosmopolitan lifestyle. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Genetic Research, Nature, Rheumatology / 28.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Chelisa Cardinez PhD Postdoctoral Researcher The Burr Laboratory- Cancer Immunology and Epigenetics Genome Sciences and Cancer Division The John Curtin School of Medical Research The Australian National University Canberra, Australia   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Psoriasis is a skin inflammatory disease that affects approximately 2-3% of the population. Previous research had identified that the cytokine IL-17 drives the development of this disease. However, key questions that remained unknown about psoriasis included where did the IL-17 come from, and why do some patients with psoriasis also go on to develop systemic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis. Our research aimed to address these questions using a gain of function (GoF) mouse model that carried a genetic variant in a gene called IKBKB. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Kidney Stones, NEJM / 28.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Thomas Robert, MD, AIX Associate Professor of Nephrology APHM (Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille) Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France   Prof. Emmanuel Letavernier, MD PhD Nephrologist at Tenon Hospital Paris, France MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Our work was prompted by emerging concerns surrounding the potential nephrotoxic effects of hair-straightening products containing glyoxylic acid. This inquiry was instigated by a patient who experienced three repeated acute episodes of kidney injury in June 2020, April 2021, and July 2022, each occurring shortly after a hair-straightening procedure. Notably, these episodes resolved with hydration. Upon examining the composition of the hair product used by the patient, which contained glyoxylic acid, and considering the patient's report of  painful ulcer scalp during application and subsequent scalp scarring, we suspected a potential link between exposure to glyoxylic acid and kidney injury. Consulting with my colleague, Professor Emmanuel Letavenier, a specialist in crystalline nephropathy at Paris, confirmed this suspicion. In summer 2023, cases series have been reported by an Israeli team (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36610611/), who described 26 patients presenting with acute renal injuries after hair straightening treatments. Biopsies revealed calcium oxalate crystals in the kidneys. The Israeli researchers suspected an effect of formaldehyde and glycolic acid, another substance found in many cosmetic products, including hair straightening products, but were unable to provide conclusive evidence. (more…)
ADHD, Author Interviews, Dermatology, JAMA, Mental Health Research / 08.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: DrJoy Wan M.D., M.S.C.E. Assistant Professor of Dermatology Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: There has been a growing body of literature linking atopic dermatitis with diagnoses such as ADHD and learning disabilities, but studies focusing on symptoms of cognitive impairment (in contrast to relying on reported diagnoses as proxy measures of such) have been fewer and demonstrate inconsistent findings. Thus, we were interested in using data from this nationally representative sample of U.S. children to examine whether atopic dermatitis was associated with symptoms of learning or memory difficulties. Moreover, we wanted to examine how this relationship is influenced by known neurodevelopmental conditions to further characterize whether specific subgroups of children with atopic dermatitis are more susceptible to cognitive impairments. (more…)
Aging, Author Interviews, Dermatology / 19.02.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Frank Wang MD William B. Taylor Endowed Professor of Clinical Dermatology Associate Professor, Dermatology Associate Chair for Education Assistant Program Director, Dermatology Residency Program University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? How is the cross-linked hyaluronic acid obtained? Where was it injected? Response: As the skin undergoes photoaging due to chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, it loses dermal collagen, which in turn leads to wrinkling, lines, and loss of support. The loss of collagen is, in large part, due to reduced function of the skin’s collagen-producing cells, dermal fibroblasts. We wanted to investigate whether it was possible to reverse the decreased function of fibroblasts in photodamaged skin, by introducing a space-filling material into the dermis, injected CL-HA dermal filler. The CL-HA filler we used was donated to us for research purposes. We performed injections of CL-HA into the mid-dermis (as is normally done when injected into the face) of severely photoaged forearm skin of human participants over the age of 60. We then examined skin samples at various time points, including 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-injection. (more…)
Allergies, Author Interviews, Dermatology, University of Michigan / 16.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Charles Schuler, MD Assistant Professor Allergy and Clinical Immunology & Mary H. Weiser Food Allergy Center University of Michigan MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that may include a skin rash, nausea, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and shock. Food anaphylaxis sends 200,000 people to the emergency room annually in the United States. Oral food challenges are when a patient ingests increasing doses up to a full serving of the suspected food allergen under supervision of a medical provider, usually an allergist. These oral food challenges are the diagnostic standard for food allergy/anaphylaxis as skin and blood allergy tests have high false positive rates. Although a highly accurate test, patients often experience anaphylaxis during oral food challenges necessitating an epinephrine injection. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, JAMA, Surgical Research / 16.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Peter C. Minneci, MD Chair of Surgery at Nemours Children’s Health Delaware Valley MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  Would you briefly explain the symptoms/course of pilonidal disease?  Response: Pilonidal disease is relatively common and affects up to 1% of the population starting in adolescence and up until young adulthood. Pilonidal disease occurs when cysts or sinuses form between the buttocks. It is believed to be an inflammatory reaction to hair or debris that gets caught in the crease of the buttocks. Risk factors for the condition include a sedentary lifestyle, hygiene and obesity. Pilonidal disease can be intermittent or chronic and recurs about 33% of the time, with 80% of recurrences taking place within a year of initial treatment. These recurrences contribute to a high degree of psychosocial stress in patients, who often miss school or sports and may avoid social activities. Pilonidal cysts may become infected, in which case patients must take antibiotics or undergo surgery.   Standard treatment for pilonidal disease involves removal of hair with razors or creams, as well as recommendations such as keeping the area clean. In recent years, some practitioners have begun using laser epilation as an additional strategy to prevent recurrence by providing more durable hair removal. However, it’s important to point out that this is not covered by insurance. In addition, as a provider, I have found that my patients that do have the means to pay often don’t comply with the number of sessions needed to fully remove the hair due to many different factors including pain and discomfort during the procedure.   (more…)
Annals Internal Medicine, Author Interviews, Dermatology / 14.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ying Li MD, PhD Graduate School Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine Chengdu, China MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a prevalent dermatological condition affecting approximately 1% of the global population. It is characterized by persistent itching and the development of hives, significantly impairing patients' quality of life. More than 90% of patients with CSU require urgent medical treatment to relieve itching. However, few therapies are specifically designed to treat pruritus in The management of pruritus is one of the main goals in the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria . Antihistamines are a common treatment of CSU, and current guidelines recommend second-generation antihistamines as first-line therapy. However, nearly 40% of patients do not respond to second-generation antihistamines, even when the dose is increased 2- to 4-fold. Omalizumab as a second-line treatment is effective in controlling urticaria, but it is costly and is not reimbursed in many countries, limiting its use to most patients worldwide. Given the shortcomings of existing therapies for pruritus in CSU, novel therapeutic interventions or strategies are emerging. Acupuncture, a traditional physical therapy with a rich historical background spanning over a millennium, has been regarded as an effective treatment for urticaria in China. However, previous randomized controlled trials investigating acupuncture's efficacy have been marred by methodological limitations, thereby undermining the credibility of the evidence. To address this gap, we conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial to comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture in the management of CSU. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Weight Research / 28.08.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Alexis Elias Malavazos Endocrinology Unit Clinical Nutrition and Cardiovascular Prevention Service, IRCCS Policlinico Unit of Radiology, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Italy   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Psoriasis is a systemic inflammatory disease often associated with obesity and type-2 diabetes (T2D). The inflammatory process of psoriasis can target adipose tissue depots, particularly those surrounding the heart and the coronary arteries, exposing them to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Immunotherapy / 18.07.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Emma Guttman-Yassky, M.D., PhD, Lead investigator of this study Waldman Professor and System Chair Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Department of Dermatology Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NY   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The idea to test how spacing out treatment or even stopping it affects treatment responses once patients are well controlled. Lebrikizumab it is a potent biologic agent with a relatively long-lasting effect. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Eli Lilly, Immunotherapy / 18.05.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Lotus Mallbris, MD PhD Dermatologist andSenior Vice President Global Immunology Development and Medical Affairs  Lilly   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  Would you briefly describe what is meant by atopic dermatitis and types treated in this study? Response: First, this study specifically evaluated lebrikizumab, a novel, investigational, monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to interleukin 13 (IL-13) with high-affinity and high potency. Inflammation due to over-activation of the IL-13 pathway plays a central role in the pathogenesis of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, commonly called eczema. This secondary analysis focused on patients treated with lebrikizumab from the 16-week induction periods of the ADvocate 1 and ADvocate 2 studies and the ADhere study. In the trials, we assessed the presence or absence of face or hand dermatitis in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis. If present at baseline, at 16 weeks, clinicians assessed the change from baseline on a scale of cleared, improved, no change, or worsened. Only patients with face and hand dermatitis were evaluated as part of the analysis. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, JAMA / 15.05.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew Zirwas, MD Founder, Bexley Dermatology Research Clinic Bexley, OH 43209 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? How does Roflumilast differ from other treatments for seb derm? Response: Seborrheic dermatitis affects up to 5% of the population globally and can have major impacts on quality of life. Treatment regimens are often complicated given the association of seborrheic dermatitis to hair bearing areas of the body, requiring multiple treatments for different parts of the body. Our phase 2 study aimed to understand the efficacy and safety of once-daily roflumilast foam 0.3% in adults with seborrheic dermatitis on their scalp, face and trunk. Roflumilast foam is a selective and highly potent phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibition that is being studied for a range of inflammatory skin conditions. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Melanoma, USPSTF / 27.04.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: John M. Ruiz, Ph.D Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology Department of Psychology University of Arizona Dr. Ruiz is the incoming editor-in-chief of the American Psychological Association (APA) journal, Health Psychology Dr. Ruiz joined the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in January 2022     MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, but it often does not cause serious complications or death. The Task Force’s recommendation on screening for skin cancer focuses on the effectiveness of visual skin exams for children and adults who do not have any symptoms. When reviewing the latest research, we found that there is currently not enough evidence to tell us whether or not screening people without signs or symptoms is beneficial. This is an I statement. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Eli Lilly, NEJM / 26.03.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jonathan Silverberg, MD, PHD, MPH Professor Director of Clinical Research Director of Patch Testing George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences Washington, DC MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Lebrikizumab was previously shown to be safe and effective as a treatment for moderate-severe atopic dermatitis in a phase 2 study. These Phase 3 randomized placebo-controlled trials are the largest studies to date of lebrikizumab in AD. They showed that lebrikizumab was safe and highly effective for the treatment of moderate-severe atopic dermatitis. These studies will hopefully support the approval of lebrikizumab in the United States later this year. (more…)
Allergies, Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Dermatology, Melanoma / 17.03.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jenni Komulainen University of Eastern Finland | UEF MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The background for this study comes from the earlier findings that the skin cancer risk and atopic status have some connection, but the results have been inconsistent. The connection between atopy and skin cancers may be related to the stimulation of protective immune response or the predisposition to carcinogenesis through chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate if atopic disorders associate with skin cancers. (more…)
Allergies, Author Interviews, Dermatology / 09.03.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Nicholas Gulati, MD, PhD Director, Early Detection of Skin Cancer and Oncodermatology Clinic The Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Department of Dermatology Mount Sinai Health System New York, New York MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What is dupilumab primarily used for? Response: Dupilumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits a specific part of the immune system known as Th2 cells, which are important in the development of various diseases including atopic dermatitis (eczema) and asthma. Therefore, dupilumab has become one of the major treatments for these conditions. Given the increasing use of this drug, it is important to understand the safety of it in terms of cancer development, as that is currently largely unknown. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Dermatology, Melanoma, Vitamin C / 10.01.2023

MedicalResearch.com Editors' note:  Please consult your health care provider before initiating any vitamin supplementation, including Vitamin D as potentially serious side effects are possible. MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Ilkka T Harvima Department of Dermatology University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital Kuopio, Finland MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The North Savo Skin Cancer Program in Eastern Finland was launched in 2017, and it aims at reducing the incidence, morbidity and mortality caused by skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. A part of this program constituted a follow-up project of patients with an assessed risk of skin cancer. There are also several other parts, such as analysis of skin cancer material reposited in the Biobank of Eastern Finland (see the enclosed BMC Cancer 2021 reference), public information, education of general physicians and medical students etc. In 2021, we published the article in BMC Cancer (enclosed), where we attempted to clarify the reasons for the relatively high melanoma mortality in relation to its incidence in this region (North Savo) of the country. By using the biobank material we also published an article in 2022 showing that melanoma and melanoma in situ associate with keratinocytic premalignant lesions and keratinocyte skin carcinomas (Suhonen V, Siiskonen H, Suni M, Rummukainen J, Mannermaa A, Harvima IT. Malignant and in situ subtypes of melanoma are associated with basal and squamous cell carcinoma and its precancerous lesions. Eur J Dermatol 2022 Apr 1;32(2):187-194. doi: 10.1684/ejd.2022.4221.). The follow-up study of about 500 subjects is ongoing (COVID-19 caused pretty much trouble for the recruitment). This is focused on finding risk factors and biomarkers for skin cancers and carcinogenesis. The first study on these follow-up patients was published in 2021 (Komulainen J, Siiskonen H, Harvima IT. Association of elevated serum tryptase with cutaneous photodamage and skin cancers. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2021;182(11):1135-1142. doi: 10.1159/000517287.). The article on vitamin D just recently published in Melanoma Research on Dec 28, 2022, is the second one. The third work in pipeline deals with the association of atopic disorders with skin cancers, and the manuscript is under revision. So, these provide with some background for the article in Melanoma Research. Actually, we thought that vitamin D use might associate with skin photoaging, actinic keratoses and carcinogenesis, but the only, though very important, finding was its association with melanoma. We have not focused our research just on vitamin D only, but it looks like we need to go further. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Lancet / 13.12.2022

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Emma Guttman-Yassky, MD, PhD Waldman Professor and System Chair The Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Department of Dermatology Director, Center of Excellence in Eczema Director, Laboratory of Inflammatory Skin Diseases Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The background for this study are studies that show that OX40 is a pathway that is upregulated in patients with atopic dermatitis (or eczema). OX40 is involved in activation of immune molecules associated with allergy and atopy, and also with formation of memory immune cells that are required for disease recurrence. The hypothesis to the study was that giving an OX40 antagonist will not only ameliorate the disease but perhaps have a remittive effect in that the disease will not come back. Indeed all drug doses were significantly effective at week 16, the primary endpoint compared to placebo and continued to improve towards week 36, the secondary endpoint. In addition, the responders to treatment maintained their responses for an additional 20 weeks, which is unusual, suggesting a potential for disease modification. (more…)
Aging, Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, Dermatology, Heart Disease, Herpes Viruses, Stroke / 23.11.2022

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:| Sharon G. Curhan, MD, ScM| Director, CHEARS: The Conservation of Hearing Study Channing Division of Network Medicine Department of Medicine Brigham and Women’s Hospital Harvard Medical School Boston, MA 02114 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response:       Herpes zoster, commonly known as “shingles,” is a viral infection that often causes a painful rash. Shingles can occur anywhere on the head or body. Shingles is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV), the same virus that causes chickenpox. After a person has chickenpox, the virus stays in their body for the rest of their life. Years and even decades later, the virus may reactivate as shingles. Almost all individuals age 50 years and older in the US have been infected with the varicella zoster virus and therefore they are at risk for shingles. About 1 in 3 people will develop shingles during their lifetime, and since age is a risk factor for shingles, this number may increase as the population ages. The risk is also higher among individuals of any age who are immunocompromised due to disease or treatment. A number of serious complications can occur when a person develops shingles, such as post-herpetic neuralgia (long-lasting pain), but there was limited information on whether there are other adverse long-term health implications of developing shingles. There is a growing body of evidence that links VZV, the virus that causes shingles, to vascular disease. VZV vasculopathy may cause damage to blood vessels and increase the risk of stroke or coronary heart disease. Although some previous studies showed a higher risk of stroke or heart attack around the time of the shingles infection, it was not known whether this higher risk persisted in the long term. Therefore, the question we aimed to address in this study was to investigate whether shingles is associated with higher long-term risk of stroke or coronary heart disease. To address this question, we conducted a prospective longitudinal study in 3 large US cohorts of >200,000 women and men, the Nurses’ Health Study (>79,000 women), the Nurses’ Health Study II (almost 94,000 women) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (>31,000 men), without a prior history of stroke or coronary heart disease. We collected information on shingles, stroke and coronary heart disease on biennial questionnaires and confirmed the diagnoses with medical record review. We followed the participants for up to 16 years and evaluated whether those who had developed shingles were at higher risk for stroke or coronary heart disease years after the shingles episode. The outcomes we measured were incident stroke, incident coronary heart disease [defined as having a non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction (heart attack) or a coronary revascularization procedure (CABG, coronary artery bypass graft or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty)]. We also evaluated a combined outcome of cardiovascular disease, which included either stroke or coronary heart disease, whichever came first. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology / 22.11.2022

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Carlota Batres, Ph.D.Assistant Professor, Department of PsychologyDirector, Preferences Lab PreferencesLab.comFranklin and Marshall College MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Previous research has found that complexion-oriented makeup products, such as foundation and concealer, make the skin appear more even. Interestingly, though, the effect size of perceptual judgements has been found to be larger than the effect size of physical measurements, suggesting that there are factors affecting the perception of skin evenness that are not captured by the physical measurements of isolated skin patches. (more…)
Dermatology, Lifestyle & Health / 28.10.2022

A recent scientific study found that Botox injections can help reduce the symptoms of mental health conditions like anxiety and depression, according to a report on Euronews. As more people seek non-invasive treatments to achieve beautiful, youthful, and natural looks, market experts predict that the medical spa industry will continue to grow. Currently, medspa therapies range from loose RNA that stimulates regeneration of skin to hydrafacials, microneedling, body sculpting, and laser hair removal. And while many people are embracing these medspa treatments, there are major concerns about their effectiveness. Keep reading to learn the science-backed health benefits of medical spa treatments. (more…)