Could Nicotinamide Be A Tool In Fight Against Skin Cancer?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof. Gary M. Halliday

Discipline of Dermatology, Bosch Institute
Central Clinical School
University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW, Australia

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The recently published article is a review paper- we reviewed previous laboratory studies of the effects of nicotinamide on normal pigment cells and on melanoma, and also the previous studies showing that nicotinamide can reduce rates of non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) in high risk patients. We have not done any clinical investigations of nicotinamide as a preventive agent for melanoma.

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Medicaid Patients May Not Have Access to IVIG for Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Kyle T. Amber, MD

Department of Dermatology
UC Irvine Health
Irvine, CA 92697-2400 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The use of IVIg has been shown in randomized controlled trials to be safe and highly effective in the treatment of both pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid. Despite its efficacy, its cost remains a deterrent to its use. Cost studies in the United States point towards IVIg being an overall cost-saving therapy in the treatment of  Autoimmune Blistering Diseases when compared to traditional immunosuppressive treatment due to the decrease in associated infections, complications, and hospitalizations.

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Iris Freckles Are A Potential Biomarker for Chronic Sun Damage

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Iris Freckles Credit: © Africa Studio / Fotolia

Iris Freckles
Credit: © Africa Studio / Fotolia

Dr.med.univ. Christoph Schwab
Departement of Ophthalmology
Medical University of Graz
Graz, Austria 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Knowledge about risk factors and/or pathways involved in pathogenesis is from special importance in order of preventing diseases.

The role of sunlight in several eye diseases is unclear. In our study we found a close relation between sun light exposure – evaluated by a full body skin examination and a personal questionnaire – and iris freckles. Therefore we suggest the presence of iris freckles as a novel biomarker indicating high ocular sun exposure.

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Drugs That Target Th17 Cells Can Improve Debilitating Skin Disease Hidradenitis suppurativa

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Jean Fletcher Assistant Professor Schools of Medicine and Biochemistry & Immunology Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin Dublin, Ireland

Hidradenitis suppurativa
Wikipedia image

Dr Jean Fletcher
Assistant Professor
Schools of Medicine and Biochemistry & Immunology
Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is an inflammatory skin disease which causes deep, painful lesions in areas such as the underarms and groin. 1-4% of people are thought to suffer from the disease, however as it is under recognised and often misdiagnosed these may be conservative estimates. The pain and distress associated with HS leads to a poor quality of life with many patients experiencing depression.
Current interventions include combinations of antibiotics, surgery to remove lesions and more recently the use of the biologic therapies such as TNF inhibitors; however these are often ineffective and there is a pressing need for more effective treatments.

The cause of Hidradenitis suppurativa is unknown, however there are known risk factors which include smoking and obesity, and there is an association with inflammatory bowel disease, which suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role.

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Study Reports Hair Repigmentation During Immunotherapy For Lung Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Noelia Rivera MD

Dermatologist
Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In the last few years some new therapies targeting immune checkpoints have been developed. The programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) are immune checkpoints that prevent the immune system to act against own tissues. By blocking these mediators it is possible to prevent tumors to escape from the immune system.

About half of the patients receiving these therapies will develop mild to moderate cutaneous adverse events. In the pre-authorization studies for malignant melanoma these include rash, vitiligo, and pruritus. “Rash” has commonly been reported as an adverse event in many oncologic trials evaluating the drugs, without providing further information about the clinical or histological details. Lately, lichenoid eruptions associated to these therapies have been reported and it suggests that an important percentage of these reactions present lichenoid histological features.

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Lithium May Reduce Melanoma Risk and Mortality

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Maryam M. Asgari, MD, MPH Department of Dermatology Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Population Medicine Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland 

Dr. Asgari

Maryam M. Asgari, MD, MPH
Department of Dermatology
Massachusetts General Hospital,
Department of Population Medicine
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente
Northern California, Oakland 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response:  Laboratory studies show lithium, an activator of  the Wnt/ß-catenin signaling pathway, slows melanoma progression, but no published epidemiologic studies have explored this association. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult white Kaiser Permanente Northern California members (n=2,213,848) from 1997-2012 to examine the association between lithium use and melanoma risk.

Our main finding is that lithium-exposed individuals had a reduced incidence of melanoma, did not develop very thick tumors (> 4 mm Breslow depth) or extensive disease at presentation, and had decreased melanoma-specific mortality compared to unexposed individuals suggesting a possible role for lithium in altering melanoma risk.

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Higher HIV Viral Loads Linked to Increased Squamous Cell Cancers of Skin

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Maryam M. Asgari, MD, MPH Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Population Medicine Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland

Dr. Asgari

Maryam M. Asgari, MD, MPH
Department of Dermatology
Massachusetts General Hospital,
Department of Population Medicine
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente
Northern California, Oakland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Nonmelanoma skin cancer – defined as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) – is a common malignant condition, affecting more than 2 million Americans every year. BCCs are more common than SCCs among individuals with healthy immune systems, while SCCs are more predominate than BCCs among people who are immunocompromised.

We examined how laboratory markers used to evaluate HIV disease progression may be associated with subsequent nonmelanoma skin cancer risk in white patients previously diagnosed with at least one such cancer from 1996 to 2008.  We measured CD4 count, viral load and subsequent nonmelanoma skin cancer. The study included 455 participants with HIV and 1,952 without HIV. All were members of the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health care plan.

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Clinical Perineural Invasion of Cutaneous SCC May Warrant Adjuvant Treatment

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Chrysalyne D. Schmults, MD, MSCE
Associate Professor of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School
Director, Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery Center and
Mr. Pritesh S. Karia, MPH
Department of Epidemiology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland

Department of Dermatology
Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130-3446 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Perineural nerve invasion (PNI) is a well-recognized risk factor for poor prognosis in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). Most cases of CSCC with PNI are identified on histologic examination at the time of surgery and the patient has no clinical symptoms or radiologic evidence of PNI. These cases are classified as incidental PNI (IPNI). However, some patients with PNI present with clinical symptoms and/or radiologic evidence of PNI. These cases are classified as clinical PNI (CPNI). A few studies have shown differences in disease-related outcomes between CSCC patients with IPNI and CPNI but consensus regarding adjuvant treatment and detailed guidelines on follow-up schedules have not yet materialized.

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Google Searches Valuable Source of Cancer Incidence and Mortality Data

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Mackenzie R. Wehner, MD, MPhil Department of Dermatology University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Weher

Mackenzie R. Wehner, MD, MPhil
Department of Dermatology
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: For some diseases, we have national registries, in which information about every person with that disease is entered for research purposes. For other diseases, unfortunately, we do not have such registries. There are growing opportunities to use information like internet searches to better understand behaviors and diseases, however. Our study was a proof-of-concept: we aimed to find out whether internet searches for diseases correlated with known incidence (how many people are diagnosed with the disease) and mortality (how many people die of the disease) rates. E.g. does the number of people who searched ‘lung cancer’ online correlate with the number of people who we know were diagnosed with or who died of lung cancer during that same time period? This is important to know if researchers in the future want to use internet search data for diseases where we lack registry information.

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When Interpreting Skin Biopsies, Pathologists Often Disagree

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Joann G. Elmore M.D., M.P.H. Professor of Medicine,  Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology, University of Washington School of Medicine Harborview Medical Center Seattle, WA 98104-2499

Dr. Elmore

Joann G. Elmore M.D., M.P.H.
Professor of Medicine,
Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology,
University of Washington School of Medicine
Harborview Medical Center
Seattle, WA 98104-2499

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

JE: Previous studies on diagnostic accuracy in interpreting melanocytic lesions exist but have small sample size, inclusion of experts only, or small numbers of specimens. We sought to examine accuracy and reproducibility in melanocytic skin lesions by improving upon the methodological limitations of previous studies. Specifically, we recruited a large national sample of practicing community and academic pathologists with a wide range of experience, and we utilized a large sample of biopsy cases that were carefully selected. Given that diagnostic errors can lead to patient deaths and invasive melanoma kills more than 9,000 Americans each year, we wanted to study the issue of diagnostic accuracy in interpreting melanocytic skin lesions in a very robust fashion.

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