Risk of Interval Colorectal Cancer Higher in Blacks Than Whites

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Stacey Fedewa PhD Strategic Director, Risk Factors & Screening Surveillance American Cancer Society, Inc. Atlanta, GA 30303

Dr. Fedewa

Stacey Fedewa PhD
Strategic Director, Risk Factors & Screening Surveillance
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Atlanta, GA 30303

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Screening for colorectal cancer is effective in reducing incidence and mortality by detecting precancerous lesions or cancer at more curable stages. But colorectal cancers can still develop in screened populations, some are missed at the time of screening; others can develop between recommended screenings. Patterns of risk for interval colorectal cancer, defined as cancers that develop after a negative result on colonoscopy, by race/ethnicity are not well known.

The risk for blacks was of interest to us because colorectal incidence and mortality rates in blacks are the highest among any race or ethnicity in the United States. We were also interested to see if quality of colonoscopy, measured by physician’s polyp detection rate, could account for differences.

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Holes in Cigarette Filters Linked To Increase in Lung Adenocarcinomas

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Peter G. Shields, M.D.
Deputy Director, Comprehensive Cancer Center
James Cancer Hospital
Professor, College of Medicine
Julius F. Stone Chair in Cancer Research
The Ohio State University Columbus, OH

MedicalResearch.com: What do we know about the health effects of cigarette filters? 
Response:  The issue is that the design of the filters makes a cigarette even more dangerous, which can be regulated by the FDA. The issue is not about having a filter, but how they are made. And now we are changing the dialogue to the design of virtually all cigarettes. The holes on the filter are likely one reason the cigarettes of today are more dangerous.

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MRI Guided Prostate Biopsies Can Improve Care and Reduce Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Vikas Gulani, MD, PhD Director, MRI, UH Cleveland Medical Center Associate Professor, Radiology, CWRU School of Medicine

Dr. Gulani

Vikas Gulani, MD, PhD
Director, MRI, UH Cleveland Medical Center
Associate Professor, Radiology, CWRU School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We wanted to learn if performing MR before prostate biopsy, followed by MR guided strategies for biopsy, are cost effective for the diagnosis of prostate cancer in men who have not previously undergone a biopsy and who have a suspicion of prostate cancer.

The most significant findings are as follows:

We found that all three MR guided strategies for lesion targeting (cognitive targeting, MR-ultrasound fusion targeting, and in-gantry targeting) are cost effective, as the increase in net health benefits as measured by addition of quality adjusted life years (QALY), outweigh the additional costs according to commonly accepted willingness to pay thresholds in the United States.

Cognitive targeting was the most cost effective. In-gantry biopsy added the most health benefit, and this additional benefit was cost-effective as well.

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Genomic Profile Can Improve Confidence in Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Bela S. Denes, MD, FACS Senior Director Medical Affairs UROLOGY Genomic Health Inc. Redwood City, CA. 94063

Dr. Bela S. Denes

Bela S. Denes, MD, FACS
Senior Director Medical Affairs
UROLOGY
Genomic Health Inc.
Redwood City, CA. 94063

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This is a prospective community based non-interventional study designed to provide information on the utility of Oncotype GPS in the management of men presenting with a new diagnosis of clinically localized low risk prostate cancer. We sought to understand the impact of incorporating a molecular marker into the shared treatment decision in practices already well versed in Active Surveillance (AS) as measured by persistence on surveillance at 2 years as well as a number of patient reported outcomes. The current publication reports on the results of a one year pre-specified interim analysis.

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Risks of Surgery For Thyroid Cancer Higher Than Expected

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Megan Rist Haymart MD Assistant Professor University of Michigan

Dr. Haymart

Megan Rist Haymart MD
Assistant Professor
University of Michigan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Thyroid cancer is typically treated with thyroid surgery. It is common practice for physicians to inform patients that the risk of vocal cord paralysis or hypoparathyroidism with thyroid surgery is 1-3%.

However, most of these estimates are based on single institution studies with high volume surgeons. In our study we evaluated surgical risks in a population-based cohort. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database, we found that 6.5% of thyroid cancer patients developed general post-operative complications (fever, infection, hematoma, cardiopulmonary and thromboembolic events) and 12.3% developed thyroid surgery specific complications (hypoparathyroidism/hypocalcemia, vocal cord/fold paralysis).

Older patient age, presence of comorbidities, and advanced stage disease were associated with the greatest risks of surgical complications.

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Malignancies More Common In Men With BRCA Germline Mutations

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Roy Mano, MD and
David Margel, MD, PhD
Department of Urology, Rabin Medical Center
Petach Tikva, Israel

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: According to previous reports, male BRCA mutation carriers have a higher risk of developing malignancies of the prostate, pancreas, breast, colon and melanoma. While malignancy screening protocols for female BRCA carriers are well established and widely implemented, little is known about the optimal screening protocol for male BRCA carriers, and current screening protocols focus on malignancies of the breast and prostate rather than offer a comprehensive screening protocol for all BRCA associated malignancies.

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E-cigarette Smoke Increases Bladder Cancer Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Moon-shong Tang, Ph</strong>D Professor of Environmental Medicine, Pathology and Medicine New York University School of Medicine Tuxedo Park, New York 10987

Dr. Moon-shong Tang

Moon-shong Tang, PhD
Professor of Environmental Medicine, Pathology and Medicine
New York University Langone School of Medicine
Tuxedo Park, New York 10987

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: E-cigarettes (E-cigs) are designed to deliver the stimulant nicotine through aerosols, commonly referred as vapors. Nicotine is dissolved in organic solvents such as glycerin and propylene glycol. The nicotine is then aerosolized by controlled electric heating. E-cigs do not use tobacco leaves and E-cig smoke does not involve the burning process. Hence, E-cig smoke (ECS) contains only nicotine and the gas phase of the solvent. Because ECS contains neither carcinogens nor allergens or odors from the tobacco burning process, E-cigs have been promoted as an invention that can deliver a TS ‘high’ without TS negative effects. The population of E-cig users is rapidly rising, particularly in young adults. It has been estimated that 16% of high school students are E-cig smokers. Therefore, the health effects of E-cig smoke, particularly its carcinogenicity, deserve careful scrutiny.

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Active Surveillance Can Be Expanded To Select Group of Younger Men With Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Keyan Salari, MD, PhD Resident in Urologic Surgery Keyan Salari is currently completing his residency in the Harvard Program in Urologic Surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and is conducting post-doctoral research in cancer genomics in the Garraway Lab at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MI

Dr. Keyan Salari

Keyan Salari, MD, PhD
Resident in Urologic Surgery
Keyan Salari is currently completing his residency in the Harvard Program in Urologic Surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and is conducting post-doctoral research in cancer genomics in the
Garraway Lab at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Active surveillance is an effective strategy addressing the problem of over treatment of clinically indolent prostate cancer, but data on the role of active surveillance in younger men is limited. Younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer are typically counseled to undergo treatment as opposed to surveillance of their prostate cancer.

To potentially expand the role of active surveillance to younger patient populations, we undertook this study evaluating the outcomes of younger men under 60 years of age who elected to pursue active surveillance of their prostate cancer.

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New Prostate Cancer Specific Assay May Reduce Need For Biopsies

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eric A. Klein, MD</strong> Chairman, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute Cleveland Clinic

Dr. Klein

Eric A. Klein, MD
Chairman, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute
Cleveland Clinic

MedicalResearch.com: Which of these results did you find most interesting or surprising?

Response: What’s most interesting is that the IsoPSA assay redefines how PSA is measured, which links it more closely to the underlying biology of cancer. Current assays measure only the concentration of PSA, which can be affected by conditions other than cancer – BPH most commonly, but also infection and inflammation – which limits its diagnostic accuracy for finding cancer. Its been known for several decades that PSA exists in multiple different forms in the bloodstream in patients with prostate cancer.

These novel molecules arise because cancer cells have deranged cellular metabolism that result in the generation of new species of PSA, making their measurement more tightly linked to the presence or absence of cancer and even the presence of high grade cancer (where cellular metabolism is even more disordered).

The IsoPSA assay is the first assay to measure all of these isoforms and thus has better diagnostic accuracy for cancer.

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Widespread Thyroid Cancer Screening Likely Leads To Overdiagnosis and Overtreatment

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. C. Seth Landefeld MD U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and  Chairman of the department of Medicine and Spencer Chair in Medical Science Leadership University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Medicine

Dr. Landefeld

Dr. C. Seth Landefeld MD
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and
Chairman of the department of Medicine and
Spencer Chair in Medical Science Leadership
University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Medicine 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Thyroid cancer is rare in the United States, and the evidence shows that screening for it leads to an increase in new diagnoses without affecting the number of people who die from it. This is because screening people without signs or symptoms for thyroid cancer often identifies small or slow-growing tumors that might never affect a person during their lifetime.

After reviewing the evidence, the Task Force found little evidence on the benefits of screening for thyroid cancer and considerable evidence that treatment, which is often unnecessary, can cause significant harms. Additionally, in places where universal screening has been implemented, it hasn’t helped people live longer, healthier lives.

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Anticancer Effects of Two Strains of Tomatoes Explored

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Antonio Giordano MD PhD Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine and Center for Biotechnology College of Science and Technology Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy

Dr. Giordano

Antonio Giordano MD PhD
Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine and Center for Biotechnology
College of Science and Technology
Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The Mediterranean diet is considered to be one of the healthiest nutrition patterns. Tomatoes, in particular, which are consumed worldwide, and a basic ingredient of the Mediterranean diet, have been postulated to have a cancer preventive role at least for some tumor types, although few studies analyzed the effects of tomatoes in their entirety in different stages of cancer progression.

Here, we focused on an in vitro model of gastric cancer because it is still one of the most common and deadly cancers and its development is strongly influenced by certain eating habits. Our results showed a possible role of tomatoes against typical neoplastic features. The treatment with tomato extracts affected the ability of cancer cell growth both in adherence and in semisolid mediums. Moreover, tomato extracts affected key processes within the cell; they hindered migration ability, arrested cell cycle through the modulation of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor family proteins and specific cell cycle inhibitors, and induced cancer cell death through apoptosis.

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Report of Benign Moles Undergoing Immune Reaction During Nivolumab Therapy in a Patient With Melanoma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Yasuhiro Nakamura, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor Department of Skin Oncology/Dermatology Comprehensive Cancer Center Saitama Medical University International Medical Center Hidaka, Saitama

Dr. Nakamura

Yasuhiro Nakamura, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Skin Oncology/Dermatology
Comprehensive Cancer Center
Saitama Medical University International Medical Center
Hidaka, Saitama

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Regressing nevi, which are frequently associated with halo phenomenon, occur in approximately 1% of the general population. In patients with melanoma, spontaneous or treatment-related depigmentation of the skin (vitiligo) is sometimes observed. Although humoral and cellular immune responses may play a crucial role in their development, immune reactions to benign melanocytic nevi (BMN) without a halo are extremely rare in both the general population and in patients with melanoma.

This publication reports a rare case with multiple metastatic melanomas who showed a remarkable clinical response to nivolumab with a simultaneous prominent immune reaction to multiple BMN without halo phenomenon. This rare phenomenon may be associated with dramatic efficacy of nivolumab in melanoma patients.

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