Transfusions From Previously Pregnant Donors Add Risk To Younger Male Recipients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Rutger Middelburg, PhD Assistant Professor in clinical epidemiology Sanquin Research and LUMC

Dr. Middelburg

Rutger Middelburg, PhD
Assistant Professor in clinical epidemiology
Sanquin Research and LUMC 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Six years ago we found transfusions from female donor to be associated with increased mortality among male recipients, especially under 50 years of age. This was an unexpected observation and we considered the probability of a false positive finding (i.e. a chance association) to be relatively high. We therefore immediately started a follow-up study with two main objectives. First, we wanted to confirm our findings in an independent and much larger cohort. Second, since some complications of blood transfusion are known to be related to pregnancy history of the donor, we wanted to study a possible relationship with previous pregnancy of the blood donors.

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Emergency Transfusion of Patients with Unknown Blood Type with Blood Group O Rhesus D Positive Blood

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. med. Kathleen Selleng, OÄ, QB Hämotherapie

Universitätsmedizin Greifswald
Institut für Immunologie und Transfusionsmedizin,
Abt. Transfusionsmedizin
Sauerbruchstraße
Greifswald Deutschland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Red blood cell concentrates (RBCs) of blood group O RhD negative are frequently used as universal blood for emergency transfusions in patients with unknown blood type. This leads to an over-proportional use of these red blood cell concentrates and regular shortages of O RhD negative RBCs.

Due to these shortages, patients with known RhD negative blood type sometimes have to be transfused with RhD positive RBCs.

The present study shows that the overall risk to induce an anti-D by transfusing all emergency patients with unknown blood type with O RhD positive RBCs is in the range of 3 to 6%, while this risk is much higher (20-30%) in RhD negative patients which have to be transfused with RhD positive RBCs due to RhD negative RBC shortages.

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Effects of Delayed Vs Early Umbilical Cord Clamping on Infant Anemia

Ola Andersson, MD, PhD Department of Women’s and Children’s Health Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Ola Andersson MD, PhD
Uppsala University,
Uppsala, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Anemia affects over 40% of all children under 5 years of age in the world. Anemia can impinge mental and physical performance, and is associated with long-term deterioration in growth and development. Iron deficiency is the reason for anemia in approximately 50% of the children.is. When clamping of the umbilical cord is delayed, ie after 3 minutes, iron deficiency up to 6 months of age can be prevented, but it has not been shown to prevent iron deficiency or anemia in older infants.

At birth, approximately 1/3 of the child’s blood is in the placenta. If clamping of the umbilical cord is done immediately (early cord clamping), the blood will remain in the placenta and go to waste (or can be stored in stem cell banks). If instead clamping is postponed for 3 minutes, most of the blood can flow back to the child as an extra blood transfusion, consisting of about one deciliter (1/2 cup) of blood, equivalent to about 2 liters (half a US gallon) of an adult. A blood donor leaves 0.4-0.5 liters of blood.

Blood contains red blood cells that contain hemoglobin. Hemoglobin carries oxygen to the tissues of the body. Hemoglobin contains a lot of iron, and the extra deciliter of blood may contain iron that corresponds to 3-4 months of the need for an infant.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends umbilical cord clamping at 1 minute or later, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends umbilical cord clamping at 30-60 seconds or later.

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Novel Oral Iron Formulation Can Correct Anemia in Non-Dialysis CKD

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Glenn M. Chertow, MD Professor Medicine, Nephrology Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Glenn M. Chertow

Dr. Glenn M. Chertow, MD
Professor Medicine, Nephrology
Stanford University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Iron deficiency is common in persons with moderate to advanced (non-dialysis-dependent) chronic kidney disease (CKD), for a variety of reasons. Conventional iron supplements tend to be poorly tolerated and of limited effectiveness. In earlier studies of patients treated with ferric citrate for its effect as a phosphate binder, we saw increases in transferrin saturation and ferritin (markers of iron stores) and hemoglobin and hematocrit (the “blood count”). Therefore, we thought we should test the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate specifically for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA).

With respect to the key findings, more than half (52%) of patients treated with ferric citrate experienced a sizeable (>=1 g/dL) increase in hemoglobin over the 16-week study period compared to fewer than one in five (19%) patients treated with placebo. Rates of adverse events (“side effects”) were similar to placebo; diarrhea in some patients and constipation in others were the most common. There were also favorable effects of ferric citrate on laboratory metrics of bone and mineral metabolism.

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Iron Deficiency Anemia Linked to Hearing Loss

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Kathleen Schieffer, BS, PhD Candidate
Biomedical Sciences and Clinical and Translational Science
Clinical and Translational Science Fellow
Hershey, PA 17033

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Hearing loss is common in the United States, with its prevalence increasing with each decade of life. Iron deficiency anemia is a common, reversible condition, associated with negative health outcomes. The inner ear is highly sensitive to ischemic damage and previous animal studies have shown that iron deficiency anemia alters the inner ear physiology. Understanding the association between iron deficiency anemia and hearing loss may open new possibilities for treatment.

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No Association Between Length of Red Blood Cell Storage and Mortality

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Märit Halmin, MD, PhD student

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet,  Stockholm, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: During recent years the possible negative effects among recipients of stored red blood cells have been investigated.  Despite a large number of studies, including four randomized trials, no consensus exists.

We therefore performed the hitherto largest register based cohort study of transfused patients, assessing the association between length of storage of red blood cells and mortality. Our design allowed for detection of small but still clinically significant effect, if such exists.

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Bleeding Risk Reduction in Relation to Predicted Factor IX Levels in Hemophilia B Patients Receiving Idelvion (rIX-FP)

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jerry Powell MD Medical Director North America Commercial Operations CSL Behring

Dr. Jerry Powell

Jerry Powell MD
Medical Director
North America Commercial Operations
CSL Behring

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The new IDELVION results presented at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) are from a pooled analysis of clinical studies from the global PROLONG-9FP clinical development program. The analysis assessed the relationship between estimated factor IX activity levels and clinical bleeding risk in adult hemophilia B patients treated with IDELVION using prophylaxis or on-demand (episodic) treatment.

The PROLONG-9FP clinical development program included five Phase I through Phase III open-label, multicenter studies evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of IDELVION in children and adults with hemophilia B.

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Computerized Working Memory Training in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Steven J. Hardy, PhD Licensed Clinical Psychologist Divisions of Hematology and Oncology Children’s National Health System Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences Washington, DC

Dr. Steven J. Hardy

Steven J. Hardy, Phd
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Divisions of Hematology and Oncology
Children’s National Health System
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences Washington, DC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Children with sickle cell disease exhibit neurocognitive deficits as a consequence of either silent or overt cerebral infarction or disease-related non-infarct central nervous system effects (likely resulting from chronic anemia and hypoxic events). These complications often lead to impairment in executive functioning (e.g., working memory, attention, inhibition, cognitive flexibility), which can make it difficult to focus in class, plan for long-term school projects, remember and carry out multi-step tasks or assignments, and stay organized. The literature on interventions to reduce neurocognitive sequelae of sickle cell disease is extremely limited.

Our research team investigated a promising home-based, computerized cognitive training program (Cogmed) involving repeated practice on performance-adapted exercises targeting working memory with a sample of youth (ages 7 – 16) with sickle cell disease. Of the participants who have enrolled in the study (n = 70), 49% exhibited working memory deficits (<25% in the general population have a working memory deficit) and were randomized to an eight-week waitlist or to begin Cogmed immediately. Participants who used Cogmed demonstrated significant improvements on multiple measures of working memory, while those randomized to the waitlist group only exhibited such improvements after receiving Cogmed. Approximately 25% of participants completed the recommended number of Cogmed sessions (20 – 25 sessions). However, analyses revealed that participants who completed at least 10 sessions (about 50% of the participants) showed comparable levels of working memory improvement.

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Monoclonal Antibody Crizanlizumab Reduces Sickle Cell Pain Crisis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kenneth I. Ataga, MD Division of Hematology/Oncology University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC

Dr. Kenneth I. Ataga

Kenneth I. Ataga, MD
Division of Hematology/Oncology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?
Response: The available treatments for acute painful episodes (also referred to as vaso-occlusive crises), the most common complication of sickle cell disease, are limited.

Findings from the Phase II SUSTAIN study showed that crizanlizumab (formerly SelG1) at 5 mg/kg reduced the median rate of sickle cell disease-related pain crises per year by 45.3% vs. placebo in patients with or without concomitant hydroxyurea therapy. In addition, clinically meaningful reductions in the frequency of painful crises were observed regardless of sickle cell disease genotype. 

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Key Barriers To Development of Artificial Red Blood Cells Overcome

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Allan Doctor, MD Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Professor of Pediatrics and (Associate) Biochemistry Washington University School of Medicine & Saint Louis Children’s Hospital St. Louis, Missouri

Dr. Allan Doctor

Allan Doctor, MD
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Professor of Pediatrics and (Associate) Biochemistry
Washington University School of Medicine &
Saint Louis Children’s Hospital
St. Louis, Missouri

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Our research team has developed the first nanoscale artificial cells designed to emulate vital functions of natural red blood cells. If ultimately confirmed safe for use in humans, this nanotechnology-based product, called ‘ErythroMer’, could represent a new and innovative alternative to blood transfusions that would be especially valuable in situations where stored blood is needed, but difficult to obtain or use, such as in pre-hospital or battlefield settings. The artificial cells are designed to be freeze-dried, stored for extended periods at ambient temperatures, and simply reconstituted with water for immediate use.

This year, the National Academy of Sciences estimated that 30,000 civilian trauma deaths/year are preventable and of these, two-thirds arise from hemorrhage in the pre-hospital phase of care. One key goal for our team is to advance treatment for trauma victims or soldiers in austere environments by initiating resuscitation in the field, particularly when transport is prolonged. ErythroMer could be a blood substitute that medics carry in their pack and literally take it out, add water, and inject. There are currently no simple, practical means to bring transfusion to most trauma victims outside of hospitals. Delays in resuscitation significantly impact outcomes; it is our goal to push timely, effective care to field settings.

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