Low Sodium Levels Linked To Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Kristen L. Nowak PhD Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Aurora, CO 80045

Dr. Nowak

Dr. Kristen L. Nowak PhD
Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Aurora, CO 80045

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  

Response: Subtle impairments in cognition are common with aging, even in the absence of clinically apparent dementia. Mild hyponatremia is a common finding in older adults; however, the association of lower serum sodium with cognition in older adults is currently uncertain.

We hypothesized that lower normal serum sodium would be associated with prevalent cognitive impairment and the risk of cognitive decline over time in asymptomatic, community-dwelling older men.

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Majority of Dialysis Patients Unemployed

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Hemodialysis machine Wikipedia image

Hemodialysis machine
Wikipedia image

Dr. Kevin F. Erickson MD, MS
Section of Nephrology and Selzman Institute for Kidney Health
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: An amendment to the Social Security Act passed in 1972 made it so nearly every person who develops end-stage renal disease – or ESRD – in the U.S. becomes eligible for Medicare, regardless of their age. At the time the law was passed, the bill’s supporters argued that access to life-sustaining dialysis therapy would enable patients to continue being productive members of society through work and activities at home. While the law has succeeded in providing access to dialysis therapy for many patients who would have otherwise died from kidney failure, it has been less successful at helping patients to continue working. The rate of employment among patients with ESRD who are receiving dialysis in the U.S. is low and has continued to decrease over time, despite both financial benefits from employment and evidence suggesting that patients who are employed experience improved quality of life and sense of wellbeing.

We used a national ESRD registry to examine trends in employment between 1996 and 2013 among patients starting dialysis in the U.S. and in the six months before ESRD. Our goal was to determine whether difficulties that patients face when trying to work begin even before they develop ESRD.

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What Are The Health Risks To Living Kidney Donors?

Emanuele Di Angelantonio MPhl Department of Public Health and Primary Care School of Clinical Medicine University of Cambridge 

Emanuele Di Angelantonio

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Emanuele Di Angelantonio MPhl

Department of Public Health and Primary Care
School of Clinical Medicine
University of Cambridge 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: This systematic review supports and expands previous research suggesting that living kidney donors have no increased risk for several major chronic diseases, with the exception of end stage renal disease. Female donors seem to be at increased risk for preeclampsia. Furthermore, there was no evidence that living kidney donors had higher risk for mortality, cardiovascular disease, or type 2 diabetes, or reduced quality of life. –

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: This study highlights the low but real risks of living kidney donation and emphasise the importance of careful assessment and counseling for all living kidney donors. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: While this systematic review and meta-analysis provide some important answers, the field is still a long way from offering precise risk estimates to prospective donors.  

No disclosures 

Citations:

O’Keeffe LM, Ramond A, Oliver-Williams C, Willeit P, Paige E, Trotter P, et al. Mid- and Long-Term Health Risks in Living Kidney DonorsA Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Ann Intern Med. [Epub ahead of print 30 January 2018] doi: 10.7326/M17-1235

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Despite 20 Years of Programs and Policies, Racial Disparities in Kidney Transplants Widen

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Tanjala S. Purnell, PhD MPH Assistant Professor of Surgery, Epidemiology, and Health Behavior and Society Core Faculty, Epidemiology Research Group in Organ Transplantation Johns Hopkins University Associate Director for Education and Training, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity Member, OPTN/UNOS Minority Affairs Committee

Dr. Purnell

Tanjala S. Purnell, PhD MPH
Assistant Professor of Surgery, Epidemiology, and Health Behavior and Society
Core Faculty, Epidemiology Research Group in Organ Transplantation
Johns Hopkins University
Associate Director for Education and Training, Johns Hopkins Center for Health Equity
Member, OPTN/UNOS Minority Affairs Committee 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

  • Our study was motivated by the fact that we know live donor kidney transplants are associated with longer life expectancy and higher quality of life than deceased donor kidney transplants or long-term dialysis treatment. We also know that Black and Hispanic adults are more likely than White adults to have end-stage kidney disease but are less likely than White patients to receive live donor kidney transplants.
  • Over the last 2 decades, there have been several transplant education programs implemented within transplant centers and dialysis centers, and legislative policies enacted to improve overall access to live donor kidney transplants for patients. We wanted to see whether these programs and policies resulted in narrowed racial and ethnic disparities in access to live donor kidney transplants in the United States. 

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Phase I Study Successfully Targets Metastatic Kidney Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kevin D. Courtney, M.D., Ph.D.  Assistant Professor UT Southwestern Medical Cente

Dr. Courtney

Kevin D. Courtney, M.D., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor
UT Southwestern Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common form of kidney cancer. Metastatic ccRCC does not respond to traditional chemotherapy.

Current standard treatments for metastatic ccRCC include drugs called vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) that block the growth of new blood vessels that feed the cancer, as well as drugs that inhibit an enzyme called mTOR that is involved in ccRCC growth and immune therapies that rev up the body’s immune response to try to fight the cancer. Each of these treatments can have significant side effects for patients that can make them difficult to tolerate.

Metastatic ccRCC is largely incurable, and we need novel and better-tolerated treatments. A central driver of ccRCC is a protein called hypoxia inducible factor 2alpha (HIF-2alpha). This protein has been very difficult to try to target with a drug. This study is the first to test a drug that targets HIF-2alpha in patients with metastatic ccRCC. The study results showed that the HIF-2alpha inhibitor, PT2385 (Peloton Therapeutics) was active in fighting metastatic ccRCC and was well-tolerated.

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NOACs For Atrial Fib Anticoagulation May Have Lower Risk of Kidney Side Effects

Atrial Fibrillation - Wikipedia image

Normal rhythm tracing (top) Atrial fibrillation (bottom) Wikipedia

Interview with:
Dr Xiaoxi Yao PhD
Assistant Professor
Researcher
Mayo Clinic

What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Lifelong oral anticoagulation, either with warfarin or a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC), is indicated for stroke prevention in most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Emerging evidence suggests that NOACs may be associated with better renal outcomes than warfarin.

The study found renal function decline is common among patients with atrial fibrillation treated with oral anticoagulants. NOACs, particularly dabigatran and rivaroxaban, may be associated with lower risks of adverse renal outcomes than warfarin.

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Common Antidepressant Sertraline Does Not Improve Depression in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Susan Hedayati MD University of Texas Southwestern Dallas, Texas

Dr. Hedayati

Dr. Susan Hedayati MD
Yin Quan-Yuen Distinguished Professorship in Nephrology
University of Texas Southwestern
Dallas, Texas

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We previously showed that Major Depression is associated with a significantly higher risk of death, dialysis initiation, and hospitalization among patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Now we show that a common antidepressant medication, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), sertraline, does not improve depression in this patient population, a chronically ill group that is not only at significantly increased risk for developing depression but also its serious complications.

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Kidney Failure From Diabetes Decreasing Across US

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Nilka Ríos Burrows, MPH, MT (ASCP)
Lead, Chronic Kidney Disease Initiative
CDC Division of Diabetes Translation. 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Kidney failure treated with dialysis or a kidney transplant is called end-stage renal disease (ESRD).  ESRD is a costly and disabling condition often resulting in premature death.

During 2000–2014, kidney failure from diabetes among U.S. adults with diabetes decreased by 33%, and it declined significantly in most states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. No state experienced an increase in kidney failure from diabetes. Continued awareness and interventions to reduce risk factors for kidney failure, improve diabetes care, and prevent type 2 diabetes might sustain these positive trends.

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SPRINT Trial: Greater Mean Blood Pressure Reductions Linked To Increased Risk of Kidney Function Decline

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Rita Magriço MD

Hospital Garcia de Orta
Almada, Portugal 
 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The SPRINT trial showed that in non-diabetic patients with high cardiovascular risk, intensive systolic blood pressure treatment (<120 mmHg) was associated with lower rates of major cardiovascular events and mortality. However, intensive treatment was unexpectedly associated with increased kidney function decline.

We thought that lowering blood pressure could compromise kidney perfusion, evaluated by mean arterial pressure (MAP). If so, the magnitude of MAP reduction was expected to be associated with kidney function decline. We hypothesized that a greater difference between the baseline MAP and the lowest achieved MAP may be associated with a higher risk of kidney function decline.

Our analysis supports this hypothesis. We discovered that MAP reduction >20 mmHg in patients with a target systolic BP <120 mmHg was associated with higher incidence of kidney function decline. The benefit-risk balance of intensive treatment seemed to be less favourable with greater MAP reduction. Prospective studies evaluating the effect of MAP reduction in addition to hypertension treatment target on kidney function decline and cardiovascular events are warranted.

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Vasopressin-Inhibitor Tolvaptan Reduces Kidney Function Decline in Polycystic Kidney Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. TorresVicente E. Torres, M.D., Ph.D.

Director of the Mayo Clinic Translational Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Experimental work pioneered by Dr. Jared Grantham showed that cyclic AMP, an intracellular signaling molecule, promotes the development and growth of cysts. Vasopressin, a hormone produced by the pituitary gland, stimulates the production of cyclic AMP in the collecting ducts, from which most cysts derive in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). While this effect of vasopressin is necessary for the kidneys to concentrate and reduce the volume of urine, it promotes the development and growth of cysts in patients with ADPKD. Dr. Vincent Gattone realized that inhibiting the action of vasopressin could be protective in polycystic kidney disease. Work in our and other laboratories confirmed that suppression of vasopressin production, release or action reduces cyst burden, protects kidney function, and prolongs survival in rodent models of the disease.

This experimental work provided a strong rationale for clinical trials of tolvaptan, a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist. Tolvaptan reduced the rate of kidney growth in the TEMPO 3:4 trial, in patients with early ADPKD. It also reduced the rate of decline in kidney function, measured by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), from 10.1 to 6.8 mL/min/1.73 m2 over three years. The eGFR benefit was maintained during two additional years when all the patients were treated with tolvaptan in an open label extension of the TEMPO 3:4 trial (TEMPO 4:4). Safety laboratory tests performed every four months showed elevations of liver transaminases in blood in 4.4% of tolvaptan and 1% of placebo-treated patients. Three of 1,271 tolvaptan-treated patients during TEMPO 3:4 and TEMPO 4:4 had evidence of potentially serious drug-induced liver injury. These abnormalities occurred all within the first 18 months of exposure to tolvaptan.

Based on the TEMPO 3:4 results, tolvaptan was approved for the treatment of rapidly progressive ADPKD in Japan, Canada, European Union, Switzerland and South Korea. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration requested additional data to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of this drug. The REPRISE trial was performed to determine the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in patients with later stage ADPKD.

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