Trial To Test Effect of Aspirin on Progression of Kidney Disease in Diabetes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Francesco Violi MD
Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties e Sapienza University
Rome, Italy

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The paper reports on the protocol of a trial where we will test the effect of aspirin on renal disease progression in diabetic patients. The study will start shortly and will be terminate next year.

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Donor Sex and Size Important to Kidney Transplant Success

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Amanda Miller, MD, FRCPC

Dalhousie University
Transplant Nephrology

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Earlier studies have shown that there may be a higher risk of kidney transplant failure if a kidney donor is smaller than their recipient. This may be due to increased strain on the relatively smaller transplanted kidney. Very few studies have investigated outcomes associated with donor and recipient weight mismatch measured directly by differences in body weight however. There is also a suggestion that sex mismatch between kidney donor and recipient may lead to worse outcomes post-transplant, however results from earlier studies have been controversial and conflicting. The combined effect of weight and sex matching/mismatching between kidney donor and recipient (two very important and physiologically relevant factors) has not been rigorously studied previously.

Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if receiving a kidney transplant from a smaller donor of the opposite sex would impact transplant outcomes. Accounting for other transplant variables, we demonstrated that if a kidney transplant recipient is more than 30 kg (66 pounds) heavier than the donor there is a 28% increased risk of the transplant failing compared to equally weighted donors and recipients. If the kidney is from a smaller donor of the opposite sex, the risk of transplant failure is further increased to 35% for a male receiving a kidney from a female donor, and 50% for a female receiving a kidney from a male donor. This risk is high and is similar to that when a recipient receives a kidney transplant from a donor who has diabetes; a known risk factor for kidney failure in the non-transplant population.

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Acute Kidney Injury Is A Frequent Complication of Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Constadina Panagiotopoulos, MD, FRCPC Department of Pediatrics, Endocrinology & Diabetes Unit British Columbia Children’s Hospital Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Dr. Panagiotopoulos

Constadina Panagiotopoulos, MD, FRCPC
Department of Pediatrics, Endocrinology & Diabetes Unit
British Columbia Children’s Hospital
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: I decided to conduct this study after observing a few cases of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) in children hospitalized with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (with two patients requiring dialysis) while on call in the 18 months prior to initiating the study. While caring for these patients, I scanned the literature and realized that aside from 2 published case reports, there had been no large-scale systematic studies assessing AKI in children with DKA. It immediately became apparent to me that managing patients with AKI and DKA was more challenging. On presentation to hospital, many of these children with DKA present quite volume depleted but fluid management is conservative because of the risk for cerebral edema.

One of the most important management strategies for acute kidney injury in patients with DKA is early detection and correcting volume depletion in a timely manner to prevent further injury. I discussed my observations and these clinical cases with pediatric nephrologist and co-investigator Dr. Cherry Mammen, a pediatric AKI expert, and he confirmed my initial literature review findings. Thus, we decided to conduct this study to better understand the scope of the problem and any associated risk factors.

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Association of Intensive Blood Pressure Control and Kidney Disease Progression in Nondiabetic Patients With CKD

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Hon-Yen Wu, MD, PhD, on behalf of all authors

Attending Physician and Assistant Professor, Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan.
Assistant Professor, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
Assistant Professor, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine,
National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
Assistant Professor, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The effect of intensive blood pressure (BP) control in nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has long been a topic of debate. We summarized the published information comparing intensive BP control (< 130/80 mmHg) with standard BP control (< 140/90 mmHg) on major renal outcomes in CKD patients without diabetes. We pooled data from 9 randomized clinical trials with more than 8000 patients and over 800 events of kidney disease progression. We found that targeting blood pressure below the current standard did not provide additional benefit for renal outcomes compared with standard BP control, but may benefit nonblack patients or those with heavy proteinuria.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: For the optimal blood pressure target in CKD patients without diabetes, an individually tailored treatment rather than a general rule to control hypertension is suggested.

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Genetic Variants Tied To Kidney Disease in African Americans

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Katalin Susztak MD, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA 19104

Dr. Susztak

Katalin Susztak MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Previous studies showed an association between genetic variants in the APOL1 gene and kidney disease development, but it has not been confidently shown that this genetic variant is actually causal for kidney disease. For this reason we developed a mouse model that recapitulates the human phenotype.

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IV Etelcalcetide (Parsibiv®) Can Treat Elevated PTH in Dialysis Patients More Effectively Than Oral Medication

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Geoffrey A. Block, MD Director of Research at Denver Nephrology Denver, Colorado

Dr. Geoffrey Block

Geoffrey A. Block, MD
Director of Research at Denver Nephrology
Denver, Colorado

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a chronic and progressive disorder characterized by elevations in parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is seen in most patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and has been associated with a number of important adverse health effects such as bone pain, fracture, premature cardiovascular disease, abnormal heart enlargement, pathologic calcium accumulation in blood vessels and tissues and premature death.

Currently there are several classes of drugs used to treat high PTH but each are associated with challenging side effects which limit their effectiveness. Active vitamin D compounds are effective in lowering PTH but do so at the expense of causing elevations in other minerals such as calcium and phosphorus which are felt to be harmful.

An oral drug known as cinacalcet (Sensipar®) is in the class of medicine known as ‘calcimimetics’ and reduces PTH and simultaneously reduces calcium and phosphorus however it must be taken daily due to its short half-life and is commonly associated with nausea when first initiated or the dose is increased. Clinical trials with cinacalcet are suggestive though not conclusive of a beneficial effect on improving cardiovascular events and prolonging life.

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Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Expenses On Par With Cancer and Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Talar W. Markossian PhD MPH Assistant Professor of Health Policy Loyola University Chicago 2160 S. First Ave, CTRE 554 Maywood, IL 60153

Dr. Talar Markossian

Talar W. Markossian PhD MPH
Assistant Professor of Health Policy
Loyola University Chicago
2160 S. First Ave, CTRE 554
Maywood, IL 60153

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Approximately 10% of U.S. adults currently have non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD), while dialysis dependent CKD accounts for only 0.5% of the U.S. population. The escalation in healthcare expenditures associated with CKD starts prior to requirement for dialysis, and treatment costs escalate as non-dialysis dependent CKD progresses.

We examined the total healthcare expenditures including out-of-pocket costs for non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease and compared these expenditures with those incurred for cancer and stroke in the U.S. adult population. After adjusting for demographics and comorbidities, the adjusted difference in total direct healthcare expenditures was $4746 (95% CI $1775-$7718) for CKD, $8608 (95% CI $6167-$11,049) for cancer and $5992 (95% CI $4208-$7775) for stroke vs. group without CKD, cancer or stroke. Adjusted difference in out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures was highest for adults with CKD ($760; 95% CI 0-$1745) and was larger than difference noted for cancer ($419; 95% CI 158–679) or stroke ($246; 95% CI 87–406) relative to group without CKD, cancer or stroke. Continue reading

Novel Oral Iron Formulation Can Correct Anemia in Non-Dialysis CKD

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Glenn M. Chertow, MD Professor Medicine, Nephrology Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Glenn M. Chertow

Dr. Glenn M. Chertow, MD
Professor Medicine, Nephrology
Stanford University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Iron deficiency is common in persons with moderate to advanced (non-dialysis-dependent) chronic kidney disease (CKD), for a variety of reasons. Conventional iron supplements tend to be poorly tolerated and of limited effectiveness. In earlier studies of patients treated with ferric citrate for its effect as a phosphate binder, we saw increases in transferrin saturation and ferritin (markers of iron stores) and hemoglobin and hematocrit (the “blood count”). Therefore, we thought we should test the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate specifically for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA).

With respect to the key findings, more than half (52%) of patients treated with ferric citrate experienced a sizeable (>=1 g/dL) increase in hemoglobin over the 16-week study period compared to fewer than one in five (19%) patients treated with placebo. Rates of adverse events (“side effects”) were similar to placebo; diarrhea in some patients and constipation in others were the most common. There were also favorable effects of ferric citrate on laboratory metrics of bone and mineral metabolism.

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Study Reevaluates NSAIDS For PDA in Premature Infants

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jonathan Slaughter, MD, MPH Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Center for Perinatal Research Nationwide Children's Hospital/The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43205

Dr. Jonathan Slaughter

Jonathan Slaughter, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
Center for Perinatal Research
Nationwide Children’s Hospital/The Ohio State University
Columbus, OH 43205

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: The ductus arteriosus, a fetal blood vessel that limits blood flow through the lungs, normally closes shortly after birth. However, the ductus often remains open in premature infants, leading to patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Infants with PDA are more likely to die or develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the major chronic lung disease of preterm infants. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) treatment has been shown to close PDAs in preterm infants and NSAID treatment of PDA is common. However, it has never been shown that PDA closure with NSAIDs leads to decreased mortality or improved long-term respiratory outcomes. NSAID closure of PDA has become increasingly controversial in recent years since NSAID treatment has been associated with acute renal injury. Also, these medications are expensive, with the usual three-dose treatment course costing well over $1000 per patient. Due to these controversies, the likelihood of a preterm infant with PDA being treated with NSAIDs varies by clinician and institution and has decreased over time.
Meta-analyses of randomized trials that investigated NSAID (indomethacin and/or ibuprofen) treatment for PDA closure in preterm infants did not show a benefit. However, they were principally designed only to study whether the ductus itself closed following treatment and not to determine if there was an improvement in mortality risk or in respiratory outcomes following NSAID treatment.
Given the difficulty of conducting randomized trials in preterm infants and the urgent need for practicing clinician’s to know whether treatment of PDA in all preterm infants is beneficial, we used a study design that incorporated the naturally occurring practice variation in NSAID treatment for PDA as a mechanism to reduce the risk of biases that are commonly found in non-randomized investigations. This is based on the premise that if NSAID treatment for PDA in preterm infants is truly effective, we should expect to see improved mortality and respiratory outcomes in instances when clinician preference-based NSAID administration rates are higher.

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Protein Loss in Urine Associated With Increased Risk of Dementia

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kay Deckers, MSc PhD student School for Mental Health and Neuroscience Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology Maastricht University The Netherlands

Kay Deckers

Kay Deckers, MSc
PhD student
School for Mental Health and Neuroscience
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology
Maastricht University
The Netherlands

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In an earlier review (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25504093), we found that renal dysfunction was one the new candidate risk factors of dementia and needed further investigation.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Albuminuria is associated with an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment or dementia.

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Hospital and Separate Dialysis Units Have Similar MRSA Rates

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Georg Schlieper, MD

MVZ DaVita Rhein-Ruhr
Duesseldorf, Germany

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in hemodialysis patients is associated with higher risk for systemic infection. Recent hospitalization and temporary dialysis access are known risk factors for MRSA colonization. Whether MRSA colonization rates in hospital-based dialysis centers differ from separate dialysis centers is unknown. Data on MRSA decolonization strategies in hemodialysis patients are scarce.

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Two Different European Strategies Achieve KDIGO Renal Anemia Targets

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dorota Drozdz M.D., Ph.D Jagiellonian University Kraków

Dr. Dorota Drozdz

Dorota Drozdz M.D., Ph.D
Jagiellonian University
Kraków

Response: In Poland and Portugal we use EPO beta for anemia treatment. Our interest was to find differences in clinical patterns taking in consideration that both countries are adherent to KDIGO recommendations an guidelines.

We found that in both countries the mean hemoglobin (Hb) level and percentage of patients in target Hb level (10-12 g/dl on ESA treatment) are the same, but the approaches were different – in Poland the ESA dose was statistically lower than in Portugal and iron dose was statistically higher than in Portugal. Most other lab tests results were similar. Future secondary outcomes analysis should answer the question, which method is safer.

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