Medicaid Expansion Improved Access to Cardiac Care Without Diminishing Outcomes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Donald Likosky, Ph.D., M.S. Associate Professor Head of the Section of Health Services Research and Quality Department of Cardiac Surgery. University of Michigan

Dr. Likosky

Donald Likosky, Ph.D., M.S.
Associate Professor
Head of the Section of Health Services Research and Quality
Department of Cardiac Surgery.
University of Michigan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Michigan was one of several states to expand Medicaid. Current evaluations of the Michigan Medicaid expansion program have noted increases in primary care services and health risk assessments, but less work has evaluated its role within a specialty service line. There has been concern among some that Medicaid patients, who have traditionally lacked access to preventive services, may be at high risk for poor clinical outcomes if provided increased access to cardiovascular interventions.

Using data from two physician-led quality collaboratives, we evaluated the volume and outcomes of percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass grafting 24mos before and 24mos after expansion. We noted large-scale increased access to both percutaneous coronary interventions (44.5% increase) and coronary artery bypass grafting (103.8% increase) among patients with Medicaid insurance. There was a decrease in access for patients with private insurance in both cohorts. Nonetheless, outcomes (clinical and resource utilization) were not adversely impacted by expansion.  Continue reading

Readmissions After Stent Surgery Common and Often Due to Co-Morbid Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

“Open Stent” by Lenore Edman is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Example of Open Cardiac Stent

Chun Shing Kwok, MBBS, MSc, BSc, MRCP(UK)
Clinical Lecturer in Cardiology and Specialist Registrar in Cardiology
Keele University & Royal Stoke University Hospital Guy Hilton Research 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a common revascularization modality in the treatment for coronary heart disease and the mortality rate after this procedure is low. Improved survival after PCI procedures has led to a growing population at risk of readmissions.  Early unplanned readmissions are important because they are a burden to patients, the local health care economy and it also serves as a quality of care indicator.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Our analysis of 833,344 PCI procedures in the United States demonstrates that unplanned readmissions within 30 days of the index PCI are common (9.3%). The mean total hospital cost was higher for patients who were readmitted compared with those not readmitted ($37,524 vs $23,211). The majority of readmissions within 30 days are noncardiac (56%), with female sex, chronic kidney disease, liver failure, atrial fibrillation, increasing comorbidity burden, and discharge location among the strongest predictors of unplanned 30-day readmission. Patients who experienced an unplanned readmission for noncardiac reasons tended to be younger, with more comorbidities, including alcohol misuse, cancer, and dementia, whereas patients who are readmitted for cardiac reasons are more likely to have in-hospital complications at their index PCI event. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our results suggest that 30-day readmissions in the United States is common and comorbid illnesses and places of discharge are important factors that influence readmissions. There are important financial consequences of such readmissions, and further strategies to reduce the prevalence should be explored. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Future work should explore if optimization of the management of any comorbid condition during a patient’s index admission for PCI and outreach programs to patients discharged to short-term hospitals, other institutions, and care homes may reduce early readmissions. 

Disclosures: Financial support was provided by the North Staffs Heart Committee. This work was conducted as a part of Dr. Kwok’s PhD research, which was supported by Biosensors International. 

Citations: 

Kwok CS, Rao SV, Potts JE, et al. Burden of 30-day readmissions after percutaneous coronary intervention in 833,344 patients in the United States: predictors, causes, and cost insights from the Nationwide Readmission Database. J Am Coll Cardiol Intv. 2018;Epub ahead of print.

Kalra A, Shishehbor MH, Simon DI. Percutaneous coronary intervention readmissions: where are the solutions? J Am Coll Cardiol Intv. 2018;Epub ahead of print.

 

 

 

 

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

Should Digoxin Still Be Used in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Renato D. Lopes MD, MHS, PhD Duke University Medical Center Duke Clinical Research Institute Durham, NC 27705

Dr. Renato Lopes

Renato D. Lopes MD, MHS, PhD
Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Duke University Medical Center
Duke Clinical Research Institute
Terrace Level, Durham, NC 27705

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

1-      Digoxin is used in ≈ 30% of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) worldwide, despite the lack of randomized clinical trials to assess its efficacy and safety in this setting.
2-      Current AF guidelines recommend digoxin for rate control in patients with AF with and without heart failure (HF).
3-      There are no specific recommendations about serum digoxin concentration monitoring in the atrial fibrillation guidelines.

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Sustaining Physical Activity With Age Decreases All-Cause Mortality Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“physical-activity-120112-M-2021D-019” by MilitaryHealth is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Trine Moholdt, PhD
Research Fellow
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging | Exercise, Cardiometabolic Health and Reproduction
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  

Response: Although obese individuals have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, evidence from many observational studies shows that in those who already have cardiovascular disease, being overweight or obese is associated with lower risk of mortality compared to their normal weight counterparts.

This phenomenon is often called the “obesity paradox”. Recently we observed that in individuals who have a high physical activity level, there is no such obesity paradox and body mass index did not associate with survival time in those who with high physical activity (Moholdt et al, American Journal of Medicine, 2017).  Continue reading

Coronary Bypass Preferable To Stenting For Diabetes With LV Dysfunction

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Jayan Nagendran MD, PhD, FRCSC Director of Research, Division of Cardiac Surgery Associate Professor, Department of Surgery Division of Cardiac Surgery University of Alberta

Dr. Nagendran

Dr. Jayan Nagendran MD, PhD, FRCSC
Director of Research, Division of Cardiac Surgery
Associate Professor, Department of Surgery
Division of Cardiac Surgery
University of Alberta

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The primary modalities of treatment of symptomatic coronary artery disease (coronary heart disease) are either percutaneous coronary intervention (coronary stunting) or coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. There are well designed clinical trials that guide clinical practice for the treatment of patients with diabetes requiring coronary revascularization and there are trials that examine the best modality of coronary revascularization in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. However, there is a lack of evidence for patients with both diabetes and left ventricular dysfunction. As such, we performed a propensity matched study of patients with diabetes and left ventricular dysfunction undergoing either percutaneous coronary intervention compared to coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. We used our provincial database that captures >100,000 patients undergoing coronary angiography to attain our two cohorts for comparison.

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Some Heart Attack Patients Without AFib Still at Increased Risk of Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Normal rhythm tracing (top) Atrial fibrillation (bottom) Wikipedia image

Normal rhythm tracing (top) Atrial fibrillation (bottom)
Wikipedia image

João Pedro Ferreira, MD, PhD &
Faiez Zannad, MD, PhD
National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM)Center for Clinical Multidisciplinary Research 1433INSERM U1116University of LorraineRegional University Hospital of NancyFrench Clinical Research Infrastructure Network (F-CRIN) Investigation Network Initiative–Cardiovascular and Renal Clinical Trialists, Nancy, France
Department of Physiology and Cardiothoracic SurgeryCardiovascular Research and Development UnitFaculty of MedicineUniversity of Porto, Porto, Portugal

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: It is uncertain whether patients with a myocardial infarction with systolic dysfunction but without atrial fibrillation have increased risk for stroke.

In this study including >22,000 patients and 600 stroke events we found a subgroup of patients at high risk for stroke despite not having atrial fibrillation. These patients are older, have worse renal function, frank signs of pulmonary congestion, hypertension and previous stroke history. We created a simple and “ready to use” score that allows the identification of these patients in routine clinical practice.  Continue reading

Chronic NOISE Exposure Linked To Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Siren” by Michael Pereckas is licensed under CC BY 2.0Professor Dr. med. Thomas Muenzel

Universitätsmedizin Mainz
Zentrum für Kardiologie, Kardiologie I 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: The background for this review is that people more and more acknowledge that noise is not just annoying the people as reported for many years, evidence is growing that chronic noise can cause cardiovascular disease including metabolic disease such as diabetes type II and mental disease such as depression and anxiety disorders and noise impairs as well the cognitive development of children.

More recent studies also provided some insight into the mechanisms underlying noise-induced vascular damage. Noise interrupts communication or sleep and thus is causing annoyance. If this occurs chronically the people develop stress characterized by increased stress hormone levels. If this persists for a long time people develop cardiovascular risk factors on tis own such as diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, one measures an increase of the blood to coagulate and the blood pressure will increase. To this end people will develop cardiovascular disease including coronary artery disease, arterial hypertension, stroke, heart failure an arrhythmia such as atrial fibrillation.

So, there is no doubt that noise makes us sick !  Continue reading

Survival From In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Improves But Still Worse on Nights and Weekends

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Uchenna Ofoma, MD, MS Associate, Critical Care Medicine Assistant Professor of Medicine, Temple University Director of Critical Care Fellowship Research Geisinger Medical Center

Dr. Ofoma

Uchenna Ofoma, MD, MS
Associate, Critical Care Medicine
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Temple University
Director of Critical Care Fellowship Research
Geisinger Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Patients who suffer in-hospital cardiac arrest at nights and during weekends (off-hours) are known to have lower rates of survival to hospital discharge, compared to their counterparts who have cardiac arrest during the daytime on weekdays (on-hours). Since overall survival to hospital discharge has improved over the past decade for the approximately 200,000 patients who experience in-hospital cardiac arrest annually, our study sought to determine whether survival differences between off-hours and on-hours arrest has changed over time.

On-hours was categorized as 7:00 a.m. to 10:59 p.m. Monday to Friday. Off-hours was categorized as 11:00 p.m. to 6:59 a.m. Monday to Friday or anytime on weekends. Among 151,071 adult patients in the GWTG-Resuscitation registry who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest between January 2000 and December 2014, slightly over half (52%) suffered a cardiac arrest during off-hours. We found that survival to hospital discharge improved significantly in both groups over the study period — for on-hours: from 16.0% in 2000 to 25.2% in 2014; for off-hours: 11.9% in 2000 to 21.9% in 2014.

However, despite overall improvement in both groups, survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest at nights during off-hours remained significantly lower compared to on-hours by an absolute 3.8%.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report? 

Response: Survival to hospital discharge has improved in both groups of patients. This is reassuring and suggests that health care providers and hospital systems must be doing something right. However, the persistent survival disparities between on-hours and off-hours arrests remains concerning. To ensure that improved survival trends are sustained over time, narrowing this gap must be made an area of focus for quality improvement efforts. Data regarding mediator variables, such as physician and nurse staffing patterns and how they changed over the course of the study was not available for this study. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: Since timing of in-hospital cardiac arrest appears to impact survival outcomes, future research should aim at identifying factors that may be associated with these described survival discrepancies and care processes that mitigate against them.

Disclosures: The authors received research support from the Geisinger Health System Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. 

Citations:

Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume 71, Issue 4, January 2018
DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.11.043
Trends in Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest During Nights and Weekends
Uchenna R. Ofoma, Suresh Basnet, Andrea Berger, H. Lester Kirchner, Saket Girotra, for the American Heart Association Get With the Guidelines – Resuscitation Investigators, Benjamin Abella, Monique L. Anderson, Steven M. Bradley, Paul S. Chan, Dana P. Edelson, Matthew M. Churpek, Romergryko Geocadin, Zachary D. Goldberger, Patricia K. Howard, Michael C. Kurz, Vincent N. Mosesso Jr., Boulos Nassar, Joseph P. Ornato, Mary Ann Peberdy and Sarah M. Perman

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

The PlaqueTec Liquid Biopsy System™ Allows Detection of Predictive Intracoronary Artery Biomarkers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

The PlaqueTec Liquid Biopsy System™ (LBS)

The PlaqueTec Liquid Biopsy System™ (LBS)

Nick West MA MD FRCP FESC FACC
Chief Medical Officer
PlaqueTec Ltd

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for the Liquid Biopsy System and this study?

Response: Despite huge advances in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease, this form of cardiovascular disease remains as the world’s number one cause of death. Although interventions such as coronary angioplasty and cholesterol lowering with statins have improved morbidity, patients still experience high rates of recurrent cardiovascular events. Various technologies have been applied to predict future patient events with limited success, such as ‘virtual histology’ intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) in the PROSPECT study (Stone GW et al. N Engl J Med 2011; 364: 226-235). Many experts acknowledge that imaging alone may be insufficient to gauge risk, and that the utility of a more biological endpoint may be more appropriate. This supposition is supported by recent data that added endothelial shear stress estimation to the PROSPECT data and significantly improved subsequent event prediction (Stone PH et al. JACC Cardiovascular Imaging 2017; Sep 18 epub ahead of print).

Coronary artery disease has long been recognised to be underpinned by an inflammatory pathogenesis, and it is bioactive molecules (growth factors, cytokines etc) within the vasculature that affect plaque growth, transformation and vulnerability to rupture, resulting in myocardial infarction. Measuring these biomolecules in situ is challenging owing to an inability to reliably sample from the ‘boundary layer’ – a slower-moving circumferential stratum of blood adjacent to the endothelial surface that does not mix with the general bulk flow.

The PlaqueTec Liquid Biopsy System™ (LBS) was designed specifically to sample from the boundary layer at four sites simultaneously within the coronary artery, where biomolecules released from plaques are likely to be most concentrated. With the LBS, we can also detect small gradients of released molecules by simultaneously collecting blood both upstream and downstream of individual plaques.

The LBS has demonstrated safety and feasibility in preclinical and preliminary clinical studies, and was awarded a CE mark in Europe as a dedicated coronary blood sampling device in 2014. Continue reading

Children with Heart Failure from Dilated Cardiomyopathy are Surviving Longer in the Most Recent Era

This file was derived from Blausen 0165 Cardiomyopathy Dilated.png

Structural categories of cardiomyopathy Wikipedia image

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Rakesh K. Singh MD, MS

Department of Pediatrics, University of California–San Diego and
Rady Children’s Hospital
San Diego, California

Steven E. Lipshultz MD
Department of Pediatrics
Wayne State University School of Medicine and
Children’s Hospital of Michigan
Detroit, Michigan 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease characterized by dilation and dysfunction of the left ventricle of the heart. While DCM is a relatively rare disease in children, nearly 40% of children with DCM require a heart transplant or die within 2 years of diagnosis. Heart transplantation has improved the outcomes of children with DCM over the last 3 decades, but is limited by donor heart availability. Newer therapies, including advanced ICU care and artificial heart machines, are now being used to treat children with DCM.

This study published in the November 28, 2017 issue of the Journal of American College of Cardiology (JACC) sought to determine whether more children with DCM were surviving longer in the more recent era. Specifically, it investigated whether children with DCM were surviving longer without the need for heart transplantation. Rakesh Singh, MD is the first author and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at UC San Diego/Rady Children’s Hospital, while the senior author is Steven Lipshultz, MD, Professor at Wayne State University School of Medicine/Detroit Medical Center’s Children’s Hospital of Michigan and Director of Children’s Research Center of Michigan.

The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) is a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) sponsored registry from 98 pediatric centers in United States and Canada created to study the outcomes of children with various heart muscle disorders known as cardiomyopathies. For this study, outcomes of 1,199 children diagnosed with DCM from 1990-1999 were compared with 754 children diagnosed with DCM from 2000-2009.

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