Directly Observed Therapy Linked To Lower Mortality In Multi-Drug Resistant TB

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Jorge Salinas MD
Epidemic intelligence service officer
Division of Tuberculosis Elimination
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Because multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) treatment regimens are less effective, more complex, and are more likely to have side effects that are difficult to tolerate than regimens for drug-susceptible TB, patients with MDR TB are at a higher risk of dying. Directly observed therapy (a therapy by which patients meet with a healthcare worker at a regularly scheduled time and place so the healthcare worker can observe the patient taking their TB medication) is recommended to treat all forms of TB disease, including MDR TB.

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Most Health Care Personnel Not Getting Tdap Vaccination

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Anup Srivastav, DVM, MPVM, PhD

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta GA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Healthcare personnel (HCP) are at risk for being exposed to pertussis (whooping cough) and spreading the disease to patients in their work settings. CDC recommends tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination for healthcare personnel to reduce their risk of getting the disease and spreading it to patients. This is the first report of Tdap vaccination coverage among healthcare personnel by occupational setting.

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Lifetime Risk of Symptomatic Hand Osteoarthritis Higher in Whites

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jin Qin, ScD, MS Epidemiologist Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chamblee, GA 30341

Dr. Jin Qin

Jin Qin, ScD, MS
Epidemiologist
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Chamblee, GA 30341 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The hand is one of the sites most commonly affected by osteoarthritis (OA) but is often understudied compared with knee and hip OA. Many people with hand OA have significant symptoms, impaired hand strength and function, and disability in activities of daily living, like using a smart phone or a computer keyboard, and opening a jar. Lifetime risk is the probability of developing a condition over the course of a lifetime.

In this study, we estimated that 40% of adults will develop symptomatic hand OA in their lifetimes. Nearly one in two women (47%) and one in four men (25%) will develop the condition. Whites have a 41% lifetime risk, compared with 29% for blacks. The lifetime risk among individuals with obesity is 47%, which is 11 percentage points higher than those without obesity.

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Younger Breast Cancer Patients Have More Later-Stage Disease and Higher Financial Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Benjamin Allaire MS RTI International Research Triangle Park Durham, NC, 27709

Benjamin Allaire

Benjamin Allaire MS
RTI International
Research Triangle Park
Durham, NC, 27709

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: More than 22,000 women younger than 45 years of age were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. Although less than 10 percent of all breast cancers are diagnosed among women younger than age 45, the types of breast cancer these younger women face are typically more aggressive, are diagnosed at more advanced stages, and result in poorer survival compared to breast cancer in older women. Younger women may also require more intense treatment, exhibit cancers that are less responsive to treatment, and have distinct and more prevalent side effects from treatment than older women. These side effects can include poorer quality of life, fertility problems, and depression.

As a result, breast cancer treatment for younger women is expensive, making them vulnerable to financial hardship. Recent research has shown that 31.8 percent of cancer survivors are likely to have cancer treatment-induced financial troubles, with higher rates among younger cancer patients. These financial difficulties cause some survivors to forego or delay necessary medical treatments.

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Cervical Cancer Is Not Just a Young Woman’s Disease: Older Women Should Have PAP Smears Too

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Mary C. White, ScD Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, CDC Atlanta GA 30341

Dr. Mary White

Mary C. White, ScD
Epidemiology and Applied Research Branch
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, CDC
Atlanta GA 30341

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: For women between the ages of 21 to 65, Pap testing every three years, or Pap testing with HPV co-testing every five years, can prevent cervical cancers and deaths.

Current recommendations state that women 65 and older and not otherwise at special risk can skip Pap tests, but only if they have had three consecutive negative Pap screening tests or two consecutive negative co-tests over the past 10 years, with the most recent done within the past five years.

We used data from two federal cancer registry programs to examine how cervical cancer risk changes with age, after excluding women who have had a hysterectomy. We also examined data from a federal national health survey to examine the proportion of women who either had never been tested or had not been tested in the last 5 years.

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Many Teens Use Less Effective Contraceptives After Pregnancy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Deborah L. Dee, PhD
Division of Reproductive Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
CDC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Although the national teen birth rate has dropped to a historic low (22.3 births per 1,000 females aged 15-19 years in 2015), many teens continue to have repeat births. Because repeat teen births are more likely than first teen births to be preterm and low birth weight, and giving birth more than once as a teenager can significantly limit a mother’s ability to attend school and obtain work experience, it’s important to assess patterns in repeat teen births and better understand contraceptive use within this population. Continue reading

Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease In US Tops 30 Million

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jennifer L. Bragg-Gresham, MS, PhD Assistant Research Scientist Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center Department of Internal Medicine - Nephrology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Dr. Bragg-Gresham

Jennifer L. Bragg-Gresham, MS, PhD
Assistant Research Scientist
Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center
Department of Internal Medicine – Nephrology
University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: While a trend toward stabilization in CKD prevalence had been detected over the past decade, the most recent data from NHANES (2013-2014) suggests this trend may be ending.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Data from 2013-2014 shows that 15.5% of the US population has reduced kidney function, up from 14.1% (2011-2012) and 12.0% (1988-1994). Over the same time period we have witnessed an increase in risk factors for CKD (age and diabetes, in particular). Adjusting for this fact accounted for much, but not all, of the increase in CKD prevalence.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Despite this finding, we should not become complacent in our fight against kidney disease, as the absolute number of individuals with CKD has increased from approximately 19.2 million (1988-2004) to 33.6 million (2013-2014) in our latest estimates. We must continue to improve awareness and detection of early stages of CKD, as well as improve treatment for CKD risk factors.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We must continue to improve awareness and detection of early stages of CKD, as well as improve treatment for CKD risk factors.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Health surveillance is paramount to the success of all public health initiatives to understand current data and varied aspects of disease, which supports correct allocation of resources.

Disclosures: This poster was supported by the Supporting, Maintaining and Improving the Surveillance System for Chronic Kidney Disease in the U.S., Cooperative Agreement Number, U58 DP006254, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services.
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Citation:

Abstract presented at the Spring 2017 National Kidney Foundation Meeting
RISING CKD PREVALENCE IN THE UNITED STATES (1988-2014)

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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Rapid Tests For Foodborne Infections Can Provide Faster Treatment But Curtail Important Outbreak Data

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ms. Ellyn Marder MPH</strong> Surveillance Epidemiologist, CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, Georgia

Ellyn Marder

Ms. Ellyn Marder MPH
Surveillance Epidemiologist, CDC
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Georgia

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: CDC’s Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) report provides the most up-to-date information about foodborne illnesses in the United States. Each year, FoodNet publishes a report that includes preliminary data compared with data from the previous three years. FoodNet has been monitoring illness trends since 1996 and collects data on about 15 percent of the U.S. population.

Campylobacter and Salmonella caused the most reported bacterial foodborne illnesses in 2016, according to preliminary data. FoodNet sites alone reported 24,029 foodborne infections, 5,512 hospitalizations, and 98 deaths in 2016. The numbers of reported illnesses by germ are: Campylobacter (8,547), Salmonella (8,172), Shigella (2,913), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (1,845), Cryptosporidium (1,816), Yersinia (302), Vibrio (252), Listeria (127) and Cyclospora (55).

This is the first time the report also includes in the total number of infections those foodborne bacterial infections diagnosed only by rapid diagnostic tests in FoodNet sites. Previously, the report counted foodborne bacterial infections confirmed only by traditional culture-based methods in the total numbers.

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Risk Factors and Stroke Rising Among Young Adults

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Mary G. George, MD, MSPH Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, Georgia

Dr. George

Mary G. George, MD, MSPH
Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, Georgia

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, killing more than 130,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 of every 20 deaths—and costs the nation $33 billion annually, including the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.

And, stroke is leading cause of serious disability. An ischemic stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, is a stroke that occurs when there is a blockage of the blood supply to the brain.

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Most Newly Arrived Refugees Have Overseas Vaccination Documentation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Deborah Lee, MPH

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We wanted to assess whether documentation for vaccines provided to refugees overseas was received by clinicians in the US and if doses of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine were integrated into the vaccine schedule as recommended for adults and children by the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

CDC recommends that US-bound refugees receive vaccinations prior to arrival in the United States. Vaccinations are documented on the Vaccination Documentation Worksheet (DS-3025), which refugees bring with them to the United States, and made available to state and local refugee health programs through CDC’s Electronic Disease Notification (EDN) system. Thirty to 90 days after arrival, most refugees have a post-arrival health assessment performed by clinicians affiliated with the state and local refugee health programs.

Our assessment indicated that most refugees had overseas vaccination documentation available at the post-arrival health assessments (87%), and that MMR vaccine was given when needed (83%). Furthermore, many refugees (90%) in our assessment did not require an additional MMR dose because they had received vaccination before entering the United States.

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High Risk Individuals Are Testing For HIV More Frequently

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Qian An, PhD

Epidemiologist/statistician
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention
CDC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Since 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended HIV testing for all persons aged 13-64 years old. Persons at high risk for HIV infection should be tested more frequently. Among sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM), repeat testing is recommended at least annually. An analysis in 2011 suggested that MSM might benefit from more frequent than annual testing.(1)

Among non-MSM, repeat testing is recommended at least annually for persons at high risk, including persons who inject drugs (PWID) and their sex partners, those who have sex in exchange for money or drugs, heterosexuals who have had more than one sex partner since their most recent HIV test, and those whose partners are living with HIV..

Using statistical models based on renewal theory, we estimate the mean HIV inter-test interval (ITI) — meaning the average time period (in months) between two successive HIV tests — to describe temporal trends in HIV testing frequency among MSM, PWID and high-risk heterosexuals (HRH) and differences in testing frequency by age and race/ethnicity. A decrease in ITI means individuals are testing more frequently.

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Cigarettes Continue To Vastly Outweigh Sales Of E-Cigarettes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kristy Marynak Master of Public Health Public Health Analyst at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Duke University

Kristy Marynak

Kristy Marynak, Master of Public Health
Public Health Analyst at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Duke University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The background for our study is that in recent years, self-reported cigarette smoking has declined among youth and adults, while electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has increased. However, sales trends for these products are less certain. Our study assessed national and state patterns of U.S. cigarette and e-cigarette unit sales using retail scanner data from convenience and grocery stores; mass merchandisers like Walmart; drug, dollar, and club stores; and military commissaries.

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