Hepatitis C Treatment After Kidney Transplant May Extend Lives and Decrease Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Mark H. Eckman, MD Posey Professor of Clinical Medicine Director, Division of General Internal Medicine Director, Center for Clinical Effectiveness University of Cincinnati Medical Center Cincinnati, OH

Dr. Eckman

Mark H. Eckman, MD
Posey Professor of Clinical Medicine
Director, Division of General Internal Medicine
Director, Center for Clinical Effectiveness
University of Cincinnati Medical Center
Cincinnati, OH 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: People who are infected with hepatitis C virus and have kidney failure need a kidney transplant.

Recent studies have found that it is possible to transplant kidneys from donors who are infected with hepatitis C virus into patients who need a transplant and are already infected with the virus. In addition, drugs are available to cure most patients of hepatitis C virus, including those who have kidney failure. Infected patients who need a kidney transplant have 2 options. One option is to receive an infected kidney and then use drugs after the transplant to cure themselves and the transplanted kidney of the virus. Another option is to use the drugs first to get rid of the virus and then to receive a kidney from a donor who does not have hepatitis C virus infection.

For the more than 500,000 patients receiving dialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), less than 4% receive kidney transplants. Because of the limited organ availability, hemodialysis is the final treatment for most patients with ESRD. Of the 10% or so of U.S. patients receiving dialysis who are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), some are willing to accept HCV-infected kidneys, in part, because the wait times for such kidneys are shorter than those for HCV-uninfected kidneys. Because the yearly mortality rate for patients receiving hemodialysis is so high, between 4% and 16%, reducing the time to kidney transplant can have a dramatic effect on both survival and quality of life.

Because it may not be possible to do this type of research with actual people, we created a model that allowed us to estimate possible outcomes without using actual people.

The model was a computer program that combined the best available information to approximate what might happen to participants in a real-world clinical trial. Continue reading

Bezafibrate: Potential Treatment for PBC and Itching From Biliary Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr Christophe Corpechot Centre de Référence Maladie Rares: Maladies Inflammatoires des Voies Biliaires et Hépatites Auto-immunes (MIVB-H) Filière Maladies Rares: Maladies Rares du Foie de l’Adulte et de l’Enfant Hôpital Saint-Antoine (APHP) et Sorbonne Universités Paris

Dr. Corpechot

Dr Christophe Corpechot
Centre de Référence Maladie Rares: Maladies Inflammatoires des Voies Biliaires et Hépatites Auto-immunes (MIVB-H)
Filière Maladies Rares: Maladies Rares du Foie de l’Adulte et de l’Enfant
Hôpital Saint-Antoine (APHP) et Sorbonne Universités
Paris

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC, previously known as “primary biliary cirrhosis”) is a rare, chronic, slowly progressive liver disease of unknown cause, mainly affecting women of middle age. It is characterized by serum marks of autoimmunity (specific auto-antibodies), chronic inflammation and destruction of small intra-hepatic bile ducts, and consequent bile secretion impairment (chronic cholestasis) leading to the progressive development of cirrhosis and liver failure. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only first-line approved treatment for PBC. It improves the biochemical measures of cholestasis and prolongs survival without liver transplantation. However, 30% to 40% of UDCA-treated patients continue to have clinically significant abnormalities of their biochemical liver tests and those patients remain at high risk of developing end-stage liver disease complications.

Recently (2016), obeticholic acid (OCA) in association with UDCA has been conditionally approved in patients with an inadequate response to UDCA. This approval (FDA, EMA) was based one the results of a 1-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of OCA in patients with an incomplete response or intolerance to UDCA (POISE trial). In this trial, OCA was shown to improve the biochemical features of cholestasis (alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level < 1.67 times the upper limit of the normal range and a reduction of at least 15% from baseline) but was associated with a significant increase of pruritus, a characteristic, potentially debilitating symptom of PBC. BEZURSO is the first ever placebo-controlled phase 3 trial of a fibrate (a class of drugs known to be agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha) in PBC. In this 2-year randomized double-blind trial, 100 patients with an incomplete response to UDCA were assigned to bezafibrate 400 mg/day (n=50) or placebo (n=50), all in association with continued UDCA therapy.

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Double-Edge Sword of Drug Epidemic

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Christine Marie Durand, M.D
.
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study

Response: Most Americans know that the United States faces an epidemic of deaths due to drug overdose.  And many are also aware that there is a critical shortage of organs available for transplant.  Perhaps less widely known is that today, more than 1 in every 8 deceased organ donors died from a drug overdose.  The objective of our study was to look at the outcomes of patients who received transplants with organs donated after an overdose.

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Middle Eastern Diet Linked To Improved Microbiome in Liver Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

“Turkish Food” by Garry Knight is licensed under CC BY 2.0Jasmohan S. Bajaj, M.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine
Division of Gastroenterology
Virginia Commonwealth University 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Altered gut microbiota composition can occur due to diseases and due to changes in the dietary practices. The interaction between these two and their linkage with clinical outcomes in liver diseases, such as cirrhosis is not clear from an international standpoint.

In this study we enrolled healthy subjects, and patients with cirrhosis who were either early or advanced in their process from USA and Turkey. We found that the Turkish subjects, who followed a Middle-eastern diet rich in vegetables and fermented milk products, had high microbial diversity, which was in turn associated with lower hospitalizations over 3 months. There was also an additional beneficial effect of coffee and tea intake. This protection persisted even when the clinical factors were accounted for. Continue reading

Most Baby Boomers Still Aren’t Screened For Hepatitis C

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

In the United States, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C are the most common types, but also included are hepatitis D and E. CDC/ E.H. Cook, Jr.

Hepatitis Virions
CDC/ E.H. Cook, Jr.

Dr. Monica Kasting PhD first author
Dr. Anna Giuliano PhD
Susan. T. Vadaparampil, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Senior Member/Professor
Center for Infection Research in Cancer
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa,
Florida.Department of Cancer Epidemiology,
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center,
Tampa, Florida 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: In the U.S., approximately 1 in 30 baby boomers are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus. Half of all cases of liver cancer are caused by hepatitis C and liver cancer is one of only three cancer types that are actually increasing in incidence in the US. Because of this, in 2012 the CDC issued a recommendation for universal screening for hepatitis C virus for everyone born between 1945 and 1965 (baby boomers). We wanted to look at the time period after that to see if the rates of screening in that population increased. From 2013-2015 screening among baby boomers only increased by 0.9% (from 11.8% to 12.7%) which indicates we still have a long way to go before we meet our goal of universal screening.  Continue reading

Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Liver Cancer in Hepatitis B Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sang Min Park MD, MPH, PhD

Chief, Department of Family Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine
Director, Health Promotion Center, Seoul National University Hospital
Professor, Department of Biomedical Science & Family Medicine
Seoul National University College of Medicine
Seoul, Korea

What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Chronic hepatitis B patients have a higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma than the general population, which has been well-established and known to be caused by progression of hepatitis B infection into severe liver diseases.

However, whether obesity-related carcinogenesis plays a central role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis B patients remained unclear. Therefore, we assessed the association between body mass index and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis B patients, and stratified all analyses by sex using healthcare big data in the Republic of Korea.

We found positive association of trends between body mass index and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in both men and women with hepatitis B infection. The magnitude of the association in women was stronger than that of men. In the severely obese category, the hazard ratio for hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly higher in women compared to men. Our findings highlight that high body mass index is associated with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis B patients, especially in women, which may be partially explained by higher fat content for the same unit of body mass index in women compared to men.

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‘Liver-on-a-Chip’ Technology Can Accurately Mimic Hepatitis B Infection

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Primary hepatocytes grown in 3D microfluidic “liver-on-a-chip” platform following infection with hepatitis B virus. Credit: Marcus Dorner/Imperial College London

Primary hepatocytes grown in 3D microfluidic “liver-on-a-chip” platform following infection with hepatitis B virus. Credit: Marcus Dorner/Imperial College London

Marcus Dorner, PhD
Non-Clinical Senior Lecturer in Immunology
Wellcome Trust Investigator
Imperial College London
Department of Medicine, Section of Virology
School of Medicine
London United Kingdom 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response:  Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection globally affects over 250 million people and is currently not curable. This infection can lead to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer and is among the leading causes for liver transplantation. Unfortunately, HBV is among the most difficult viruses to study in the laboratory, since model systems are not very good at recapitulating what happens in infected humans.

We have just described the first model to effectively change this. Using an artificial “Liver-on-a-Chip”, we have developed a tool, which can potentially revolutionise how we study viral infections by merging the study of viruses with tissue engineering. This model is over 10,000-fold more susceptible to HBV infection and accurately mimics, what happens in an infected patient. This can now be utilised to develop novel and potentially curative therapies, which would benefit millions of people currently living with chronic HBV infection.  Continue reading

Hepatitis: 8 Weeks of Once Daily, Combination Pill Found Effective in HCV 1 and 3

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

In the United States, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C are the most common types, but also included are hepatitis D and E. CDC/ E.H. Cook, Jr.

In the United States, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C are the most common types, but also included are hepatitis D and E.
CDC/ E.H. Cook, Jr.

Stefan Zeuzem, M.D.
Professor of Medicine
Chief Internal Medicine
Goethe University Hospital
Frankfurt, Germany

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major global public health problem with more than 71 million people infected worldwide, and can result in significant morbidity and mortality, including liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death.1

This publication describes the efficacy and safety results from two Phase 3 clinical trials, ENDURANCE-1 and ENDURANCE-3, in patients with chronic HCV genotypes (GT) 1 or 3 infection who were treated with an all-oral, once-daily combination regimen of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) glecaprevir (GLE) at 300 mg and pibrentasvir (PIB) at 120 mg.

The findings from ENDURANCE-1 trial show that the GLE/PIB combination regimen (G/P) given for 8 weeks to HCV GT1 chronically infected non-cirrhotic treatment-naïve or treatment-experienced (with sofosbuvir and/or interferon with ribavirin) patients was safe and well-tolerated, achieved high efficacy with a sustained virologic response at post-treatment week 12 (SVR12) rate >99% and was non-inferior to 12-week treatment with G/P.

The trial also included subjects who were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and all of these subjects achieved SVR12 while maintaining HIV suppression throughout the study. ENDURANCE-3 trial results show that the G/P regimen given for 8 weeks to HCV GT3 chronically infected non-cirrhotic treatment-naïve patients was safe and well-tolerated, achieved high efficacy in this historically difficult to cure GT with an SVR12 rate >94%, and was non-inferior to 12-week treatment with G/P, which in turn was non-inferior to the treatment with 12-week DAA regimen of sofosbivir and daclatasvir.  Continue reading

Benefits of Transplanting Hepatitis C Infected Livers May Outweigh Risks

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jagpreet Chhatwal, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School MGH Institute for Technology Assessment Boston, MA

Dr. Chhatwal

Jagpreet Chhatwal, PhD
Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School
MGH Institute for Technology Assessment
Boston, MA and

Sumeyye Samur PhD Postdoctoral Fellow MGH-Harvard Medical School

Dr. Samur

Sumeyye Samur PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
MGH-Harvard Medical School

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The number of patients who are in need of liver transplant continues to rise whereas the availability of organs remains limited, therefore, it becomes is important to utilize all available livers.

Under the current practices, only Hep-C infected patients are eligible to receive infected livers. However, with the advent of high efficacy drugs, number of infected recipients has decreased over the last decade. On the other hand, with the rise of opioid use, number of Hep-C infected organs increased. With this contradiction, it becomes paramount of importance to utilize the infected livers which could help save more lives on the transplant waiting list.

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The Global Liver Institute Launches NASH Council To Fight Insidious Liver Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Donna R. Cryer, JD CEO, Global Liver Institute

Donna Cryer JD

Donna R. Cryer, JD

CEO, Global Liver Institute

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this Council?

Response: The Global Liver Institute operates my constantly assessing the liver health landscape for what we call advocacy gaps to determine where we allocate our time and resources. We identified NASH 2 years ago as an imminent global public health crisis due to the tens of millions of diagnosed and estimated undiagnosed patients rising with rates of obesity and diabetes with no concomitant recognition and activity by public, patients, or physicians. We decided to launch the NASH Council with collaborative patient and physician leadership and involving Hepatology but deliberately reaching out to primary care, endocrine, cardiology, and obesity organizations.
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Drinking Coffee Reduced Mortality in Treated HIV-Hepatitis C Co-Infected Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Coffee Wikipedia image

Coffee
Wikipedia image

Patrizia Carrieri PhD
INSERM U912 – ORS PACA
IHU – Faculté de Médecine
Marseille, France

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study is based on the longitudinal data of the French  ANRS HEPAVIH cohort of patients with HIV and Hepatitis C co-infection. This cohort was set up thanks to a collaboration between INSERM (National Institute of health and medical research) UMR912 in Marseille, the ISPED (public health and epidemiology institute) in Bordeaux and several hospital/university sites. Our INSERM team in Marseille is specialized in the study of the impact of behaviors on HIV and HCV outcomes, including mortality.

We could think that HCV cure was enough to reduce mortality in HIV-HCV patients as the mortality risk was 80% lower in those who were cured of (i.e. who “cleared”) Hepatitis C thanks to treatment.

However, our study showed that, even after HCV cure, sociobehavioral factors still matter: drinking at least 3 cups of coffee a day was associated with a 50% reduction in mortality risk as well as not smoking which was also associated with a reduced mortality risk. This association between elevated coffee intake and reduced mortality risk is probably due to the properties of polyphenols contained in coffee which can protect the liver and also reduce inflammation.

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Liver Key To Development of Diabetic Vascular Complications

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Mauricio Berriel Diaz Deputy Director & Head of Division Metabolic Dysfunction and Cancer Institute for Diabetes and Cancer IDC Helmholtz Center Munich and Joint Heidelberg-IDC Translational Diabetes Program Heidelberg University Hospital, Molecular Metabolic Control Medical Faculty, Technical University Munich Neuherberg, Germany

Dr. Berriel Diaz

Dr. Mauricio Berriel Diaz
Deputy Director & Head of Division Metabolic Dysfunction and Cancer
Institute for Diabetes and Cancer IDC
Helmholtz Center Munich and
Joint Heidelberg-IDC Translational Diabetes Program
Heidelberg University Hospital, Molecular Metabolic Control
Medical Faculty, Technical University Munich
Neuherberg, Germany 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Our institute takes part in a german collaborative research consortium (https://www.klinikum.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php?id=132204&L=1), in which the key objective is to understand why in diabetes mellitus late complications occur even when blood sugar is well controlled.

Our study focused the role of the liver and of inflammatory signaling, as the latter is known to be increased in metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes mellitus. We found that TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the liver abolished the function of the transcription factor GAbp. Impaired hepatic GAbp function resulted in transcriptional inactivation of the cellular energy sensor AMPK, which in turn induced hepatic cholesterol secretion, hypercholesterolemia and eventually atherosclerotic lesion formation.

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Hepatitis C Can Be Safely Treated By Primary Care Providers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sarah Kattakuzhy, MD Clinical and Administrative Director, DC PFAP Hepatitis Clinical Research Program Assistant Professor, Institute of Human Virology Division of Infectious Diseases University of Maryland 

Sarah Kattakuzhy, MD
Clinical and Administrative Director, DC PFAP Hepatitis Clinical Research Program
Assistant Professor, Institute of Human Virology
Division of Infectious Diseases
University of Maryland  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The recent introduction of highly effective, well-tolerated direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy for hepatitis C virus infection has raised the possibility of rapid treatment expansion and widespread cure. However, the current specialist workforce is insufficient to meet the treatment demands of the 2.7 million Americans living with HCV infection. Several studies of partial task shifting—shared treatment between specialists and primary care providers—have demonstrated success in improving access to HCV care. Yet, information on the success of nonspecialists practicing independent of specialist supervision is limited.

The primary objective of ASCEND was to evaluate the efficacy of Hepatitis C treatment managed independently by 3 community-based provider types—nurse practitioners (NPs), PCPs, and specialists—after a succinct, guideline-driven educational intervention, set within a real-world, urban population.

In this investigation, 516 out of 600 patients achieved SVR, a response rate of 86% (95% CI, 83.0% to 88.7%), with no major safety signals. Rates of SVR were consistent across the 3 provider types—NPs: 89.3% (CI, 83.3% to 93.8%); PCPs: 86.9% (CI, 80.6% to 91.7%); and specialists: 83.8% (CI, 79.0% to 87.8%). Patient loss to follow-up was the major cause of non-SVR.

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Liver Cancer Incidence and Deaths Rising, With Wide Ethnic Disparities

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Farhad Islami, MD PhD  Strategic Director, Cancer Surveillance Research American Cancer Society, Inc. Atlanta, GA 30303

Dr. Islami

Farhad Islami, MD PhD
Strategic Director, Cancer Surveillance Research
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Atlanta, GA 30303

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Liver cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the United States, accounting for nearly 29,000 deaths per year, with variations in occurrence by race/ethnicity and state.

We examined trends in liver cancer incidence, survival, and mortality in the United States and provided liver cancer mortality rates by race/ethnicity at the national and state level. State-level statistics are particularly important as they can inform state cancer control and prevention planning. We also provided detailed information on prevalence and trends in major risk factors for liver cancer and interventions to prevent or reduce their burden, to make our article a comprehensive yet concise source of information on liver cancer statistics, risk factors, and interventions in the United States.

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Cirrhosis May Raise Risk of Hemorrhagic Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Neal S. Parikh, M.D.
Administrative Chief Resident
Department of Neurology
Weill Cornell Medicine & NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In contrast to the gastrointestinal and systemic hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications of cirrhosis, little was known about the risk of cerebrovascular complications.

In this analysis of Medicare beneficiaries’ claims data, we found cirrhosis to be associated with stroke, with associations appearing to be stronger for hemorrhagic stroke than for ischemic stroke. We controlled for demographic variables and stroke risk factors and relevant comorbidities, and our results were essentially unchanged in multiple sensitivity analyses.

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High Hepatitis C Cure Rate Using Elbasvir plus Grazoprevir In Chronic Kidney Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Annette Bruchfeld MD, PhD Senior Consultant Associate Professor Karolinska Institute Dept of Renal Medicine, M99 Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. Bruchfeld

Annette Bruchfeld MD, PhD Senior Consultant
Associate Professor
Karolinska Institute
Dept of Renal Medicine, M99
Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge
Stockholm, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In patients with stage 4–5 chronic kidney disease(CKD), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can accelerate the decline in kidney function, impair health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and decrease survival chances of both patients and grafts in transplantation recipients.

In this study additional data from patients with stage 4–5 chronic kidney disease undergoing treatment for HCV infection in the C-SURFER study, including HRQOL and resistance analyses was presented not previously reported for this patient population with gwnotype 1 infection.

The final virological analysis of this study indicated a high cure rate with sustained virological response at 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12) in more than 98% of all treated patients. Even in patients with resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) the SVR was high in 11 (84·6%) of 13 patients genotype 1a infection.

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Single Tablet Triple Therapy Effective For Refractory Hepatitis C

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Marc Bourlière

Professeur Associé CHP (Associate Professor PHC)
Chef de service (Head of Department)
Hôpital Saint Joseph
Hépato-Gastroentérologie

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The majority of HCV patients can be cured with combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs); however, there is still 5 to 10% of patients who relapse after treatment with DAAs for whom there are currently no approved therapeutic options available.

In these two international phase 3 studies, we have demonstrated that a single tablet triple regimen combining sofosbuvir, velpastasvir and voxilaprevir (a pangenotypic protease inhibitor) for 12 weeks cured 96% of the patients who had relapsed following prior treatment with DAA regimens including NS5A inhibitors and 98% of the patients who had relapsed following prior treatment with DAA regimens without an NS5A inhibitor. These two studies demonstrate that a pangenotypic retreatment option for this patient population could be soon available.

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Genetic Marker Can Determine Cirrhosis Patients Who Do Not Benefit From Hepatitis C Cure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Winston Dunn, MD Assistant Professor The University of Kansas Medical Center

Dr. Dunn

Dr. Winston Dunn, MD
Assistant Professor
The University of Kansas Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: It is widely believed that everyone with HCV can be cured with the medications now a day. But sadly, about 5% of the patients already have very bad damage done to the liver. We call this decompensated cirrhosis. Our medication is still very effective in curing the virus, but in decompensated cirrhosis, curing the virus is not always enough.

Only about half to two-thirds of patients with decompensated cirrhosis clinically gets better, but the remaining struggles along or even gets worse after the cure. That is the problem. So, our research was to understand why that was.

We used genetic factor to predict which patient would get better and which patient would not. We found that a gene previous found to be predictive of fatty liver and fibrosis is also predictive of recovery in this setting.

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Xpert HCV Viral Load Test Can Detect Active Hepatitis C Infection From Fingerstick

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jason Grebely PhD Associate Professor Senior Research Fellow (UNSW) Viral Hepatitis Clinical Research Program

Dr. Grebely

Jason Grebely PhD
Associate Professor
Senior Research Fellow (UNSW)
Viral Hepatitis Clinical Research Program

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Globally, testing and diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection remain low. Although point of care tests for HCV infection exist, but many of these tests only measure HCV antibodies (previous exposure), not HCV RNA (active infection). Given that 25% of individuals spontaneously clear HCV infection, efforts to enhance diagnosis of chronic HCV infection and improve the HCV care cascade requires enhanced uptake of HCV RNA testing.

We conducted the first evaluation of the Xpert HCV Viral Load test (manufactured by Cepheid) – a point-of-care hepatitis C virus test that can detect active infection – from a finger-stick sample of blood. We established that there is good sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load point-of-care test using blood samples collected by finger-stick in participants attending drug health and homelessness services in Australia.

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Fecal Transplantation Reduced Hospitalizations and Improved Cognitive Function in Cirrhosis Trial

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jasmohan S. Bajaj, M.D. Virginia Commonwealth University Associate Professor Department of Internal Medicine Division of Gastroenterology

Dr. Bajaj

Jasmohan S. Bajaj, M.D.
Virginia Commonwealth University
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine
Division of Gastroenterology

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Hepatic encephalopathy is a devastating complication of cirrhosis, which often recurs despite standard of care therapy with lactulose and rifaximin. This has a basis in an altered gut milieu therefore we need to change that in a more meaningful way to help patients. This was an FDA-monitored Phase I safety study of Fecal microbiome transfer (FMT) using a rationally-derived donor compared to standard of care.

We found that FMT was safe and was associated with lower all-cause and hepatic encephalopathy-related hospitalizations over 5 months compared to standard of care.

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