Liver Key To Development of Diabetic Vascular Complications

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Mauricio Berriel Diaz Deputy Director & Head of Division Metabolic Dysfunction and Cancer Institute for Diabetes and Cancer IDC Helmholtz Center Munich and Joint Heidelberg-IDC Translational Diabetes Program Heidelberg University Hospital, Molecular Metabolic Control Medical Faculty, Technical University Munich Neuherberg, Germany

Dr. Berriel Diaz

Dr. Mauricio Berriel Diaz
Deputy Director & Head of Division Metabolic Dysfunction and Cancer
Institute for Diabetes and Cancer IDC
Helmholtz Center Munich and
Joint Heidelberg-IDC Translational Diabetes Program
Heidelberg University Hospital, Molecular Metabolic Control
Medical Faculty, Technical University Munich
Neuherberg, Germany 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Our institute takes part in a german collaborative research consortium (https://www.klinikum.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php?id=132204&L=1), in which the key objective is to understand why in diabetes mellitus late complications occur even when blood sugar is well controlled.

Our study focused the role of the liver and of inflammatory signaling, as the latter is known to be increased in metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes mellitus. We found that TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the liver abolished the function of the transcription factor GAbp. Impaired hepatic GAbp function resulted in transcriptional inactivation of the cellular energy sensor AMPK, which in turn induced hepatic cholesterol secretion, hypercholesterolemia and eventually atherosclerotic lesion formation.

Continue reading

Hepatitis C Can Be Safely Treated By Primary Care Providers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sarah Kattakuzhy, MD Clinical and Administrative Director, DC PFAP Hepatitis Clinical Research Program Assistant Professor, Institute of Human Virology Division of Infectious Diseases University of Maryland 

Sarah Kattakuzhy, MD
Clinical and Administrative Director, DC PFAP Hepatitis Clinical Research Program
Assistant Professor, Institute of Human Virology
Division of Infectious Diseases
University of Maryland  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The recent introduction of highly effective, well-tolerated direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy for hepatitis C virus infection has raised the possibility of rapid treatment expansion and widespread cure. However, the current specialist workforce is insufficient to meet the treatment demands of the 2.7 million Americans living with HCV infection. Several studies of partial task shifting—shared treatment between specialists and primary care providers—have demonstrated success in improving access to HCV care. Yet, information on the success of nonspecialists practicing independent of specialist supervision is limited.

The primary objective of ASCEND was to evaluate the efficacy of Hepatitis C treatment managed independently by 3 community-based provider types—nurse practitioners (NPs), PCPs, and specialists—after a succinct, guideline-driven educational intervention, set within a real-world, urban population.

In this investigation, 516 out of 600 patients achieved SVR, a response rate of 86% (95% CI, 83.0% to 88.7%), with no major safety signals. Rates of SVR were consistent across the 3 provider types—NPs: 89.3% (CI, 83.3% to 93.8%); PCPs: 86.9% (CI, 80.6% to 91.7%); and specialists: 83.8% (CI, 79.0% to 87.8%). Patient loss to follow-up was the major cause of non-SVR.

Continue reading

Liver Cancer Incidence and Deaths Rising, With Wide Ethnic Disparities

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Farhad Islami, MD PhD  Strategic Director, Cancer Surveillance Research American Cancer Society, Inc. Atlanta, GA 30303

Dr. Islami

Farhad Islami, MD PhD
Strategic Director, Cancer Surveillance Research
American Cancer Society, Inc.
Atlanta, GA 30303

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Liver cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the United States, accounting for nearly 29,000 deaths per year, with variations in occurrence by race/ethnicity and state.

We examined trends in liver cancer incidence, survival, and mortality in the United States and provided liver cancer mortality rates by race/ethnicity at the national and state level. State-level statistics are particularly important as they can inform state cancer control and prevention planning. We also provided detailed information on prevalence and trends in major risk factors for liver cancer and interventions to prevent or reduce their burden, to make our article a comprehensive yet concise source of information on liver cancer statistics, risk factors, and interventions in the United States.

Continue reading

Cirrhosis May Raise Risk of Hemorrhagic Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Neal S. Parikh, M.D.
Administrative Chief Resident
Department of Neurology
Weill Cornell Medicine & NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In contrast to the gastrointestinal and systemic hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications of cirrhosis, little was known about the risk of cerebrovascular complications.

In this analysis of Medicare beneficiaries’ claims data, we found cirrhosis to be associated with stroke, with associations appearing to be stronger for hemorrhagic stroke than for ischemic stroke. We controlled for demographic variables and stroke risk factors and relevant comorbidities, and our results were essentially unchanged in multiple sensitivity analyses.

Continue reading

High Hepatitis C Cure Rate Using Elbasvir plus Grazoprevir In Chronic Kidney Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Annette Bruchfeld MD, PhD Senior Consultant Associate Professor Karolinska Institute Dept of Renal Medicine, M99 Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. Bruchfeld

Annette Bruchfeld MD, PhD Senior Consultant
Associate Professor
Karolinska Institute
Dept of Renal Medicine, M99
Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge
Stockholm, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In patients with stage 4–5 chronic kidney disease(CKD), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can accelerate the decline in kidney function, impair health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and decrease survival chances of both patients and grafts in transplantation recipients.

In this study additional data from patients with stage 4–5 chronic kidney disease undergoing treatment for HCV infection in the C-SURFER study, including HRQOL and resistance analyses was presented not previously reported for this patient population with gwnotype 1 infection.

The final virological analysis of this study indicated a high cure rate with sustained virological response at 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12) in more than 98% of all treated patients. Even in patients with resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) the SVR was high in 11 (84·6%) of 13 patients genotype 1a infection.

Continue reading

Single Tablet Triple Therapy Effective For Refractory Hepatitis C

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Marc Bourlière

Professeur Associé CHP (Associate Professor PHC)
Chef de service (Head of Department)
Hôpital Saint Joseph
Hépato-Gastroentérologie

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The majority of HCV patients can be cured with combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs); however, there is still 5 to 10% of patients who relapse after treatment with DAAs for whom there are currently no approved therapeutic options available.

In these two international phase 3 studies, we have demonstrated that a single tablet triple regimen combining sofosbuvir, velpastasvir and voxilaprevir (a pangenotypic protease inhibitor) for 12 weeks cured 96% of the patients who had relapsed following prior treatment with DAA regimens including NS5A inhibitors and 98% of the patients who had relapsed following prior treatment with DAA regimens without an NS5A inhibitor. These two studies demonstrate that a pangenotypic retreatment option for this patient population could be soon available.

Continue reading

Genetic Marker Can Determine Cirrhosis Patients Who Do Not Benefit From Hepatitis C Cure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Winston Dunn, MD Assistant Professor The University of Kansas Medical Center

Dr. Dunn

Dr. Winston Dunn, MD
Assistant Professor
The University of Kansas Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: It is widely believed that everyone with HCV can be cured with the medications now a day. But sadly, about 5% of the patients already have very bad damage done to the liver. We call this decompensated cirrhosis. Our medication is still very effective in curing the virus, but in decompensated cirrhosis, curing the virus is not always enough.

Only about half to two-thirds of patients with decompensated cirrhosis clinically gets better, but the remaining struggles along or even gets worse after the cure. That is the problem. So, our research was to understand why that was.

We used genetic factor to predict which patient would get better and which patient would not. We found that a gene previous found to be predictive of fatty liver and fibrosis is also predictive of recovery in this setting.

Continue reading

Xpert HCV Viral Load Test Can Detect Active Hepatitis C Infection From Fingerstick

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jason Grebely PhD Associate Professor Senior Research Fellow (UNSW) Viral Hepatitis Clinical Research Program

Dr. Grebely

Jason Grebely PhD
Associate Professor
Senior Research Fellow (UNSW)
Viral Hepatitis Clinical Research Program

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Globally, testing and diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection remain low. Although point of care tests for HCV infection exist, but many of these tests only measure HCV antibodies (previous exposure), not HCV RNA (active infection). Given that 25% of individuals spontaneously clear HCV infection, efforts to enhance diagnosis of chronic HCV infection and improve the HCV care cascade requires enhanced uptake of HCV RNA testing.

We conducted the first evaluation of the Xpert HCV Viral Load test (manufactured by Cepheid) – a point-of-care hepatitis C virus test that can detect active infection – from a finger-stick sample of blood. We established that there is good sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load point-of-care test using blood samples collected by finger-stick in participants attending drug health and homelessness services in Australia.

Continue reading

Fecal Transplantation Reduced Hospitalizations and Improved Cognitive Function in Cirrhosis Trial

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jasmohan S. Bajaj, M.D. Virginia Commonwealth University Associate Professor Department of Internal Medicine Division of Gastroenterology

Dr. Bajaj

Jasmohan S. Bajaj, M.D.
Virginia Commonwealth University
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine
Division of Gastroenterology

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Hepatic encephalopathy is a devastating complication of cirrhosis, which often recurs despite standard of care therapy with lactulose and rifaximin. This has a basis in an altered gut milieu therefore we need to change that in a more meaningful way to help patients. This was an FDA-monitored Phase I safety study of Fecal microbiome transfer (FMT) using a rationally-derived donor compared to standard of care.

We found that FMT was safe and was associated with lower all-cause and hepatic encephalopathy-related hospitalizations over 5 months compared to standard of care.

Continue reading

Spermidine in Foods Such As Aged Cheese Prevents Liver Damage and Extends Life — in Mice

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Leyuan Liu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Center for Translational Cancer Research Institute of Biosciences and Technology Texas A&M University Houston, Texas 77030

Dr. Liu

Leyuan Liu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor
Center for Translational Cancer Research
Institute of Biosciences and Technology
Texas A&M University
Houston, Texas 77030

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Our research team has been working on the question why people develop cancers and how we can prevent or cure them. In contrast to public views, we concluded from our studies that cancers, similar to our age-related diseases, originate from inefficiencies of our body to clean up cellular wastes accumulated during our lifespan. The most important pathway to clean up those wastes is called autophagy, or cellular self-eating behavior. We study how autophagy is regulated, how autophagy causes cancers, and whether we can control autophagy to prevent or cure cancers.

Previously we found autophagy is regulated by a protein called MAP1S and mice without MAP1S are more likely to develop liver cancer. We have been seeking ways to improve MAP1S-mediated autophagy to prevent liver cancer. Our current study show that spermidine, a natural component existing in many foods, can increase the stability of MAP1S proteins and activate MAP1S-mediated autophagy. Concurrent with the benefits of expand mouse lifespans ours also reported, spermidine can suppress the development of liver fibrosis and liver cancer specifically through MAP1S if we add spermidine into the daily drinking water of mice.

Continue reading