Morbidity and Financial Costs of Atrial Fibrillation High and Likely to Grow

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sandra L. Jackson, PhD National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chamblee GA

Dr. Sandra  Jackson

Sandra L. Jackson, PhD
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Chamblee GA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: People who have atrial fibrillation are at increased risk for having a heart attack or stroke. While we know that the percentage of the population with atrial fibrillation is increasing in the US, there is no national surveillance system to track the burden of emergency department visits, hospitalizations and deaths related to atrial fibrillation across all ages and health insurance provider types. This study combined data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and the National Vital Statistics System to provide national estimates for atrial fibrillation-related healthcare service use and deaths from 2006-2014.

Continue reading

Risk Factors for Adverse Events in Emergency Procedural Pediatric Sedation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Maala Bhatt MD, MSc., FRCPC Director, Pediatric Emergency Research Staff Physician, Emergency Medicine  Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario

Dr. Bhatt

Maala Bhatt MD, MSc., FRCPC
Director, Pediatric Emergency Research
Staff Physician, Emergency Medicine
Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Procedural sedation, defined as the administration of medications to minimize pain and awareness, has become standard practice in pediatric emergency departments worldwide to facilitate short, painful procedures such as orthopedic reduction and complex laceration repairs. Although emergency department sedation is regarded as safe, serious adverse events have been reported. The incidence of these events has been difficult to determine due to the infrequency of their occurrence and lack of large, multi-center surveillance studies focused on systematic detection of adverse events. Previous studies of emergency department sedation have been limited by single-center design and small sample sizes. These studies have not been able to reliably predict sedation-related adverse events, their severity or impact on patients.

To improve understanding of the safety and comparative effectiveness of ED procedural sedation, we conducted a large multi-center cohort study using standardized outcome measures that are valid and relevant to clinical practice. Our primary objective was to determine which practices lead to the best outcomes in children undergoing emergency department procedural sedation.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: We enrolled 6,295 patients undergoing parenteral procedural sedation for a painful procedure in one of six Canadian pediatric emergency departments from July 2010 to February 2015.

The overall incidence of adverse events in our population was 11.7%. Oxygen desaturation (5.6%) and vomiting (5.2%) were the most common events. Serious adverse events and significant interventions in response to an adverse event were rare occurring in only 1.1% and 1.4% of patients respectively.

We found that choice of sedation medication had the biggest impact on the incidence of adverse events and need for significant interventions in response to those events. The incidence of serious adverse events and significant interventions was lowest among patients sedated with ketamine-alone and highest among patients sedated with combination drugs ketamine+propofol and ketamine+fentanyl. We also found that pre-procedural opioid administration was strongly associated with increased odds of oxygen desaturation, vomiting and need for significant interventions, regardless of sedation medication.

Higher doses of ketamine were associated with increased odds of oxygen desaturation and vomiting. These findings are in opposition to the common belief that ketamine does not exhibit a dose-response relationship.

We also found that pre-procedural anti-emetics were associated with a 50% reduction in the odds of vomiting. However, based on published evidence, use in children under five years may not be as advantageous as their baseline risk is much lower.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Procedural sedation for children provided by Emergency Physicians in these tertiary care pediatric emergency departments is safe and effective with low rates of serious adverse events (1.1%) and significant interventions (1.4%). Ketamine, Ketamine and Propofol and Propofol alone are all effective and safe in the hands of competent/experienced providers, however using ketamine alone is associated with fewer serious adverse events and significant interventions.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Our finding that administering opioids prior to sedation increases the odds of oxygen desaturation, vomiting and the need for significant interventions is interesting. Future work could focus on the timing of opioid administration and the incidence of adverse events. We are also interesting in understanding the longer term effects of sedation medications, controlling for age.

Disclosures: This study was supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Team Grant in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Bhatt M, Johnson DW, Chan J, Taljaard M, Barrowman N, Farion KJ, Ali S, Beno S, Dixon A, McTimoney CM, Dubrovsky AS, Sourial N, Roback MG, for the Sedation Safety Study Group of Pediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC). Risk Factors for Adverse Events in Emergency Department Procedural Sedation for Children. JAMA Pediatr. Published online August 21, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.2135

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Limited Benefit To Expedited Stress Testing of Chest Pain In ER Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Alexander Sandhu, MD MS

Cardiology Fellow
Stanford University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Millions of patients present to the emergency department with chest pain but most do not have lab or EKG findings that indicate the patient is having a heart attack. In patients without signs of a heart attack, stress testing is frequently used to determine the need for further workup and treatment. However, there is limited evidence regarding the benefit of stress testing in these patients.

We evaluated how cardiac testing – stress testing and coronary angiography – in these low-risk patients was associated with clinical outcomes. We used a statistical approach that took advantage of the fact that testing is more available on weekdays than weekends. We found that testing was associated with more angiography and revascularization (coronary stenting or coronary artery bypass surgery) but was not associated with a reduction in future heart attacks.

Continue reading

Health Care Personnel Have Poor Understanding of Costs of ER Care

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kevin Hoffman, DO Emergency medicine resident Lakeland Health in Saint Joseph, Michigan

Dr. Hoffman

Kevin Hoffman, DO
Emergency medicine resident
Lakeland Health in Saint Joseph, Michigan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In this study, we researched emergency department providers’ understanding of the costs of care for three routine patient presentations. Our study differed from the majority of previous studies with the use of clinical vignettes and cost determination for the entire visit. This is in contrast to previous research which focused on cost assessment of individual tests or medications. We wanted to use a study design that was more realistic and applicable to the way we work in the emergency department (ED). The hope is that with this research based on clinical scenarios that the data will be more easily translated back into potential changes and ways to improve efficiency in the ED.
Continue reading

Fore! Most Common Golf Injuries Result From Getting Hit By Club or Ball

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Gary Smith, MD, DrPH</strong> Director, Center for Injury Research and Policy Nationwide Children’s Hospital Columbus, OH

Dr. Smith

Gary Smith, MD, DrPH
Director, Center for Injury Research and Policy
Nationwide Children’s Hospital
Columbus, OH

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Golf is enjoyed worldwide as a leisure activity and competitive sport. While golf is viewed as a low-risk sport, acute traumatic and overuse injuries do occur. Previous studies have generally focused on the clinical aspects of golf-related injuries. Few studies examine injuries that occurred during practice at home or school, or due to conditions or hazards on a golf course.

Continue reading

Rory’s Regulations: Faster Is Better When It Comes To Sepsis Care

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Christopher W. Seymour, M.D., M.Sc. Assistant professor of Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine, and member of Clinical Research Investigation and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Seymour

Christopher W. Seymour, M.D., M.Sc.
Assistant professor of Critical Care Medicine and Emergency Medicine, and member of Clinical Research Investigation and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness
University of Pittsburgh

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Following the tragic and widely publicized death of Rory Staunton, 12, from undiagnosed sepsis in 2012, New York became the first state to require that hospitals follow a protocol to quickly identify and treat the condition. The mandate led to widespread controversy in the medical community as to whether such steps would have saved Rory or anyone else’s life.

Rory’s Regulations require hospitals to follow protocols for early identification and treatment of sepsis, and submit data on compliance and outcomes. The hospitals can tailor how they implement the protocols, but must include a blood culture to test for infection, measurement of blood lactate (a sign of tissue stress) and administration of antibiotics within three hours of diagnosis—collectively known as the “three-hour bundle.”

We analyzed data from nearly 50,000 patients from 149 New York hospitals to scientifically determine if  Rory’s Regulations worked. We found that they did – 83 percent of the hospitals completed the bundle within the required three hours, overall averaging 1.3 hours for completion. For every hour that it took clinicians to complete the bundle, the odds of the patient dying increased by 4 percent.

Continue reading

Efficient Protocol Allows Primary Stroke Centers To Ensure Access To Thrombectomies

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Ryan A. McTaggart M.D. Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Imaging, Neurology, and Neurosurgery @mobilestroke4U Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University Rhode Island Hospital

Dr. Ryan  McTaggart

Ryan A. McTaggart M.D.
Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Imaging, Neurology, and Neurosurgery
@mobilestroke4U
Warren Alpert School of Medicine
Brown University
Rhode Island Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Stroke is the #1 cause of disability and 5th leading cause of death. Mechanical thrombectomy (direct mechanical removal of the obstructing blood clot) is a dramatically effective treatment for the most devastating of all acute ischemic strokes – emergency large vessel occlusion (ELVO).

Access to this treatment can be optimized with the use of

1) mobile stroke unit technology,

2) changing our Emergency medical services triage algorithms so that stroke matches that of trauma (using field severity to transport the right patient, to the right hospital, the first time, whenever possible), and

3) improving in-hospital processes at Primary Stroke Centers (PSCs) so that patients with suspected ELVO who present to a PSC (a hospital that does not offer mechanical thrombectomy) do not get left behind and untreated.

This study reflects an effort to address and improve the third item.

Continue reading

Use of HEART Score in ER Can Help Evaluate Low Risk Chest Pain

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Judith Poldervaart MD, PhD Assistant professor Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care University Medical Center  Utrecht

Dr.Poldervaart

Judith Poldervaart MD, PhD
Assistant professor
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care
University Medical Center
Utrecht

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Since its development in 2008, interest in the HEART score is increasing and several research groups around the world have been publishing on the HEART score. After validation of any risk score for cardiac events, there is a concern about the safety when used in daily practice.

We were able to show the HEART score is just as safe as the usual care currently used at EDs, which has not been shown yet in previous research. That we did not find a decrease in costs, is probably due to the hesitance of physicians to discharge low-risk patients from the ED without further testing. But extrapolation of the findings of a cost-effectiveness analysis (including nonadherence) suggests that HEART care could lead to annual savings of €40 million in the Netherlands. Hopefully, in time (and more publications of the HEART score now appearing almost weekly from all over the world) this effect on use of health care resources will become more apparent.

Continue reading

Youth With Autism Use Emergency Rooms At Markedly Increased Rate

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Guodong Liu, PhD  Assistant Professor Division of Health Services and Behavioral Research Department of Public Health Sciences, A210 Penn State University College of Medicine Hershey, PA 17033

Dr. Guodong Liu

Guodong Liu, PhD 
Assistant Professor
Division of Health Services and Behavioral Research
Department of Public Health Sciences, A210
Penn State University College of Medicine
Hershey, PA 17033

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use emergency department services four times as often as their peers without autism, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The findings suggest that youth with autism may need better access to primary care and specialist services.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Although there was no significant increase in autism rates among adolescents in the study over the nine-year period, emergency department use in adolescents with autism increased five-fold, from 3 percent in 2005 to 16 percent in 2013. During the same time period, emergency department use in adolescents without an autism diagnosis remained steady at around 3 percent.  there could be a link between this underutilization of preventive care services and overuse of emergency department services.

On average, adolescents with autism had a four-time higher risk of visiting the emergency department than adolescents without ASD.  Older adolescents with autism also visited the emergency department more often than their younger counterparts. A third of middle and late adolescents in this group had medical emergencies, compared to just one-tenth of early adolescents.  Females and individuals living in rural areas were more likely to visit the emergency room than males and those living in urban areas.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We want to see more data on adolescents with ASD to confirm his findings. We are planning a similar study of emergency department use in adolescent Medicaid patients with autism. Our goal is to plot an unbiased nationally representative picture of how this special population fares in terms of their emergency department usage and, in related work, hospitalizations.

We are also searching for modifiable factors that could be addressed to reduce emergency visits and resulting hospitalizations in adolescents with autism. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: These Young ASD patients need to be actively taken care of and monitored. There should be better communication between these adolescents and their caregivers and with their regular pediatricians and specialists. If we can do those kinds of things we may help them have less frequent emergencies. This study was published by the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

I have no disclosures.

Lead author: Dr. Guodong Liu, assistant professor of public health sciences, Penn State University College of Medicine.

Other researchers on this study were Amanda M. Pearl, PhD and Michael J. Murray, MD, Department of Psychiatry; Lan Kong, PhD, Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Public Health Sciences; and Douglas L. Leslie, PhD, Division of Health Services and Behavioral Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, all at Penn State College of Medicine.

Penn State College of Medicine Junior Faculty Development Program funded this research.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Guodong Liu, Amanda M. Pearl, Lan Kong, Douglas L. Leslie, Michael J. Murray. A Profile on Emergency Department Utilization in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2016; 47 (2): 347 DOI: 10.1007/s10803-016-2953-8

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

 

 

Risk Factors for Unplanned Transfer to the ICU after ED Admission

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Marleen Boerma MD
Department of Emergency Medicine
Elisabeth-Tweesteden Hospital
Tilburg, The Netherlands

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Unplanned Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission has been used as a surrogate marker of adverse events, and is used by the Australian Council of Healthcare Accreditation as a reportable quality indicator. If we can identify independent variables predicting deterioration which require ICU transfer within 24 hours after emergency department (ED) admission, direct ICU admission should be considered. This may improve patient safety and reduce adverse events by appropriate disposition of patients presenting to the ED.

This study shows that there were significantly more hypercapnia patients in the ICU admission group (n=17) compared to the non-ICU group (n=5)(p=0.028). There were significantly greater rates of tachypnea in septic patients (p=0.022) and low oxygen saturation for patients with pneumonia (p=0.045). The level of documentation of respiratory rate was poor.

Continue reading