Fluoxetine (Prozac) Did Not Reduce Risk of Depression After Stroke, But Did Raise Risk of Fractures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Prof .Gillian Mead Chair of Stroke and Elderly Care Medicine

Prof. Mead

Prof. Gillian Mead
Chair of Stroke and Elderly Care Medicine

Prof Martin Dennis Chair of Stroke Medicine

Prof. Dennis

Prof. Martin Dennis
Chair of Stroke Medicine

Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences
The University of Edinburgh

 


MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: We are both practicing stroke physicians as well as clinical trialists. Therefore our interest in this area was triggered by the exciting results of the FLAME trial in 2011. This appeared to indicate that fluoxetine might boost the recovery of stroke patients. Potentially this was very important given the increasing numbers of people having disability due to stroke, and the fact that fluoxetine is inexpensive and could be introduced very easily into clinical practice. We were further encouraged by the large numbers of small RCTs we identified when we carried out a Cochrane systematic review on the topic. These trials provided more evidence of potential benefit but there was evidence that trials of greater quality showed less benefit, and benefits were greater in patients who were depressed. We felt there was a need for more evidence derived from much larger numbers of patients.

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For Most Patients, Tennis Elbow is Self-Limiting

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Amin Mohamadi, MD, MPH Research Fellow Harvard Medical School Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston, MA 02215

Dr. Mohamadi

Amin Mohamadi, MD, MPH
Research Fellow
Harvard Medical School
Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, MA 02215 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response:  “Tennis elbow” is a painful conditions caused by overuse of the tendons in the forearm, typically in a patient’s dominant arm. Overuses syndromes are resulted from repetitive stress injury without signs of inflammation. Tennis elbow afflicts more than 200,000 new patients in the United States every year, which is not only limited to athletes, but also laborers, food industry workers, manufacturers and office workers – anyone who uses the hands and wrists for hours each day. In addition, many clinicians and scientists believe that tennis elbow is a self-limited condition in which, the majority of patients will be symptom-free after a period of time. However, no meta-analysis has evaluated this notion.

Numerous treatments are available for patients to alleviate their pain and restore their pain-free grip strength but few high quality trials and meta-analyses have compared these treatments. In this largest meta-analysis to date, we compared results of 11 different treatment modalities evaluated in 36 randomized to identify if any of these treatments are more effective and safer than the others. Overall,  2746 patients were evaluated in our meta-analysis and we found that all of the evaluated treatments only showed a modest effect, at best , on pain relief and strength of grip. While there was only modest effect for some treatments, all of interventions increased risk of adverse events in comparison with placebo and none of them seemed to be safer than others.

In the next step we were curious to find out what will be outcome of patients who were treated with only placebo, a pill or injection without effective medication or sham treatment— when the therapeutic device was not turned on. Interestingly, we found that across all of clinical trials,  totally 92% of patients experienced substantial pain relief after a month of receiving only placebo or sham treatment. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our results imply that for most patients, tennis elbow is a self-limiting condition.  Based on this analysis, our overall recommendation is “wait and see”. However, for some groups “wait and see” may not be a feasible option, so we recommend for these groups an intervention that is most effective in short-term. Because almost all patients reported only minimal pain after the first four weeks, clinicians treating patients with tennis elbow may consider opting for a pain relief regimen to manage symptoms on a patient-to-patient basis. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Future research should investigate the outcome rest in comparison with those who continued their actives with same intensity. There are also some evidence showing particular exercises may be beneficial and finally future research can identify if any particular patients group are at higher risk for none pain resolutions.  

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: We evaluated almost all of the non-surgical treatments available for tennis elbow and showed that they provide only minimal effect over placebo. For example corticosteroids were more effective than placebo within the first 4 weeks but this effect was transient and did not seem to be effective after 4 weeks. In addition, 47 patients would be needed to get corticosteroid injections so that only 1 less patient suffer from pain compared with those who received placebo.

Citation:

Jayson Lian, Amin Mohamadi, Jimmy J. Chan, Phillip Hanna, David Hemmati, Aron Lechtig, Ara Nazarian. Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Enthesopathy of the Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 2018; 036354651880191 DOI: 10.1177/0363546518801914 

Nov 7, 2018 @ 9:28 pm

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

Most Health Care Costs Associated With Osteoporotic Fractures Occur in First Year

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kandice A. Kapinos, Ph.D. Economist Professor RAND Corporation Pardee RAND Graduate School 

Dr. Kapinos

Kandice A. Kapinos, Ph.D.
Economist
Professor
RAND Corporation
Pardee RAND Graduate School 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: The economic burden of osteoporotic fractures is substantial with studies estimating the annual healthcare cost burden between $10 to 17 billion. Although estimates from individual studies vary, most studies assessing costs after a fracture only explore up to twelve months following a fracture. There is little investigation of how fracture patients’ costs evolve over a longer post-fracture period.

As osteoporotic fractures are one of the most common causes of disability among older adults and can translate into greater medical costs, we focused on studying Medicare beneficiaries. In fact, previous research has suggested that most of the increase in Medicare spending over time can be explained from costs associated with treating higher risk Medicare beneficiaries.

Our objective in this study was to compare health care costs over a 3-year period of those who experienced a fracture to those who did not among a sample of Medicare beneficiaries who were at an increased risk of having a fracture.

Consistent with previous studies, we found a significant increase in expenditures in the year immediately following a fracture relative to controls: almost $14,000 higher for fractures relative to controls. However, at 2 and 3-years post-fracture, there were no significant differences in the change in expenditures between fracture cases and controls. We note that these findings may be different for beneficiaries living in skilled nursing facilities or other non-community-based settings.

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Zoledronate (Reclast, Zometa) Reduced Fractures in Older Women with Osteopenia

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Prof Ian Reid Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences University of Auckland Auckland New Zealand 

Prof. Reid

Prof Ian Reid
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences
University of Auckland
Auckland New Zealand 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Bisphosphonates prevent fractures in patients with osteoporosis, but their efficacy in women with less marked bone loss (referred to as osteopenia) is unknown.

Most fractures in postmenopausal women occur in osteopenic patients, so therapies with efficacy in osteopenia are needed.

Continue reading

In Non-Locking Meniscal Knee Tears, Physical Therapy May Be As Good As Surgery

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
"Meniscus adalah tisu/rawan berbentuk huruf C yang berfungsi mencegah dua tulang bergesel di antara satu sama lain di bahagian lutut. Tisu meniscus yang koyak berpunca kebiasaannya daripada bersukan yang melibatkan pergerakan lutut yang banyak. Warga emas" by Rawatan Alternatif Shah Alam is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Victor A. van de Graaf, MD
OLVG Ziekenhuis
Amsterdam

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Although meniscal surgeries are among the most frequently performed surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery, until just recently there were hardly any randomized trials proving its superiority over conservative treatment.

In this randomized clinical trial, including 321 patients with non-obstructive (e.g. no locking of the knee joint) meniscal tears, we found physical therapy non-inferior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. 

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Number of Knee Arthroscopic Procedures Declines

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr-David-Howard

Dr. Howard

Prof. David H. Howard PhD
Department of Health Policy and Management
Emory University
Atlanta, GA 30322

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: There is a lot of skepticism that physicians respond to evidence, especially when trials report that widely-used, separately-reimbursed procedures are not effective.

Physicians are reluctant to abandon treatments. This study shows that in the case of knee arthroscopy, evidence has made a difference. The use of knee arthroscopy declined by 23% in Florida between 2002 and 2015. This change occurred despite increases in the prevalence of osteoarthritis.  Continue reading

Genetic Testing Could Identify Individuals At Risk of Osteoporosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Stuart Kim - PhD Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus Bio-X Affiliated Faculty James H. Clark Center Stanford University

Dr. Kim

Stuart Kim PhD
Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus
Bio-X Affiliated Faculty
James H. Clark Center
Stanford University 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Osteoporosis is caused by a reduction in bone mass, and leads to a high incidence of bone fracture because the weakened bone is less able to withstand the stress of slips and falls. Osteoporosis affects millions of elderly, is responsible for as many as 50% of fractures in women and 25% of fractures in men over the age of 50, and accounts for $19 billion in annual health care costs in the US. Identification of people with an increased genetic risk for osteoporosis could reduce the incidence of bone fracture. Low BMD is also a risk factor for stress fractures. For athletes and military personnel undergoing harsh rigors of training, stress fractures are common injuries that limit playing time, military effectiveness and competitive success.

Using data from UK Biobank, a genome-wide association study identified 1,362 independent SNPs that clustered into 899 loci of which 613 are new. These data were used to train a genetic algorithm using 22,886 SNPs as well as height, age, weight and sex as predictors. Individuals with low genetic scores (about 2% of those tested) showed a 17-fold increase in risk for osteoporosis and about a 2-fold increase in risk of fractures. Continue reading

Surgery For Spondylolisthesis (Spinal Stress Fractures) Reduced Chances of Opioid Dependence

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Beatrice Ugiliweneza, PhD, MSPH Assistant Professor Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine Department of Health Management and Systems Science School of Public Health and Information Sciences University of Louisville

Dr. Ugiliweneza

Beatrice Ugiliweneza, PhD, MSPH
Assistant Professor
Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center
Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine
Department of Health Management and Systems Science
School of Public Health and Information Sciences
University of Louisville

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study stems from the observed opioid crisis in the United States in recent years. Opioids are used in the management of pain. In the spine population, back pain is one of the main conditions for which opioids are consumed.

A frequent cause of that pain is degenerative spondylolisthesis. We aimed to evaluate the effect of surgery, which has been shown to improve outcomes, on opioid dependence. We found that surgery is associated with reduced odds of opioid dependence.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report? 

Response: One interesting finding that we observed is that patients are twice less likely to become opioid dependent than they are to become dependent after surgery. However, an important note to keep in mind is that about 10% of patients will be opioid dependent after surgery (about 6% prior non-dependent and 4% prior dependent).  

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work? 

Response: Surgery has been proven to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Future research should explore why some patients remain or become opioid dependent after surgery.

It would also be interesting to look at the effect of other treatments for degenerative spondylolisthesis (such as epidural steroid injections for example) on opioid dependence.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Spine surgeons should have systems that help them recognize patients who are likely to become opioid dependent after surgery. Our paper discusses factors to watch for such as younger age, prior dependence, etc… This would help provide targeted attention and hopefully combat the ramping opioid crisis.

The authors have no disclosures. 

Citation:

Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine
Posted online on June 19, 2018.
Factors predicting opioid dependence in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis: analysis from the MarketScan databases
Mayur Sharma, MD, MCh, Beatrice Ugiliweneza, PhD, MSPH1, Zaid Aljuboori, MD1, Miriam A.Nuño, PhD2, Doniel Drazin, MD3, and  Maxwell Boakye, MD, MPH, MBA1

The information on MedicalResearch.com is provided for educational purposes only, and is in no way intended to diagnose, cure, or treat any medical or other condition. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health and ask your doctor any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. In addition to all other limitations and disclaimers in this agreement, service provider and its third party providers disclaim any liability or loss in connection with the content provided on this website.

 

USPSTF: Women 65 and Older Should Be Screened for Osteoporosis to Prevent Fractures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Chien-Wen Tseng, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.E.E. Hawaii Medical Service Association Endowed Chair in health services and quality research Associate professor, and the Associate research director Department of Family Medicine and Community Health University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine

Dr. Chien-Wen Tseng

Chien-Wen Tseng, M.D., M.P.H., M.S.E.E.
Hawaii Medical Service Association Endowed Chair in health services and quality research
Associate professor, and the Associate research director
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this recommendation statement? What are the main findings and recommendations?

Response: Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become weak and can break or fracture more easily. These fractures can happen at the spine, hip, and other locations, and can have serious health consequences such as pain, limited mobility, or even death. By 2020, more than 12 million Americans over the age of 50 are expected to have osteoporosis and two million fractures occur yearly.

Since people often may not know they have osteoporosis until they have a fracture, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force looked at the evidence to see if screening for osteoporosis can help to prevent fractures. We found that screening for and treating osteoporosis can prevent fractures in women ages 65 and older and in younger women who have been through menopause and have additional factors that put them at increased risk for osteoporosis.

In men, more research is needed to know if routine screening and treatment for osteoporosis can prevent fractures. Continue reading

Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Patients Have Higher Likelihood of Osteoporosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Jonathan L. Silverberg MD PhD MPH Assistant Professor in Dermatology Medical Social Sciences and Preventive Medicine Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Dr. Jonathan Silverberg

Dr. Jonathan L. Silverberg MD PhD MPH
Assistant Professor in Dermatology
Medical Social Sciences and Preventive Medicine
Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Persons with atopic dermatitis have a number of risk factors for osteopenia and osteoporosis, including systemic atopy and inflammation, being less physically active and using a lot of topical and/or systemic corticosteroids. We aimed to determine whether adults with atopic dermatitis in fact have higher rates of physician-diagnosed osteopenia and osteoporosis.

Continue reading

Number of Joint Replacements Drop in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients 

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Hip Replacement NIH Image

Hip Replacement
NIH Image

Samuel Hawley | Research Assistant (NIHR PhD Project) |
Pharmaco- and Device Epidemiology Group |
Centre for Statistics in Medicine | NDORMS |
University of Oxford 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The aim was to disentangle some of the potential reasons for the recent decline in joint replacement rates among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in the developed world.

The main findings from our UK patient-level analysis indicated that joint replacement rates were not significantly different for users of TNF inhibitors versus the patients who remained only on conventional synthetic DMARDS, however we did find that TNF inhibitor use amongst older RA patients was associated with a 40% reduction in hip replacement rates. Continue reading

Study Compares Hospitals Enrolled in Medicare’s Voluntary vs Mandatory Bundled Payment Programs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Amol Navathe, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Health Policy and Medicine Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Navathe

Amol Navathe, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor, Health Policy and Medicine
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Bundled payment is a key Medicare Alternative Payment Model (APM) developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to increase health care value by holding health care organizations accountable for spending across an episode of care. The model provides financial incentives to maintain quality and contain spending below a predefined benchmark.

In 2013, CMS launched the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative to expand bundled payment nationwide. BPCI’s bundled payment design formed the basis for CMS’s Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) Model beginning in 2016. While the programs are similar in design, BPCI is voluntary while CJR is mandatory for hospitals in selected markets. Moreover, CJR is narrower in scope, focusing only on lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR) and limiting participation to hospitals.

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2/3 Canadians Do Not Receive Timely Surgery for Hip Fractures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Daniel Pincus MD Department of Surgery Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences University of Toronto

Dr. Pincus

Daniel Pincus MD
Department of Surgery
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences
University of Toronto

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We chose to look at hip fractures because is the most common reason for urgent surgery complications have be tied to wait times (and in particular wait times greater than 24 hours).

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Urinary Biomarkers Identify Early Problems With Hip Replacements

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Rick Sumner, PhD, FAAA The Mary Lou Bell McGrew Presidential Professor for Medical Research Chair, Department of Cell & Molecular Medicine (formerly, Anatomy and Cell Biology) Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL  60612

Dr. Sumner

Rick Sumner, PhD, FAAA
The Mary Lou Bell McGrew Presidential Professor for Medical Research
Chair, Department of Cell & Molecular Medicine (formerly, Anatomy and Cell Biology)
Rush University Medical Center
Chicago, IL  60612

 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The main cause of failure for total hip replacements is implant loosening which is often a consequence of particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis. Unfortunately, this condition is usually not diagnosed until it has progressed to the point of needing a revision surgery.

We discovered two biomarkers that may be useful for identifying at risk patients much earlier than is currently possible. Continue reading

Does Chiropractic Care Benefit Low Back Pain?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Back Pain” by betterhealthosteopathy is licensed under PDM 3.0Christine Goertz DC, PhD

Vice Chancellor for Research and Health Policy
Palmer College of Chiropractic

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Low back pain in the leading cause of physical disability worldwide, with up to 80% of US adults seeking care for this debilitating condition at some point in their lives. Low-back pain is also one of the most common causes of disability in U.S. military personnel.

Although a number of studies have previously evaluated chiropractic care for low back pain, the vast majority had small sample sizes and did not study chiropractic as part of a multi-disciplinary approach to care in real world settings, including the military.

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Drug Holidays From Osteoporosis Meds Linked to More Broken Bones

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Just a hairline fracture...” by Gloria Bell is licensed under CC BY 2.0Brittany Bindon, MD

Department of Internal Medicine
University of Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Bisphosphonates are commonly used in the treatment of osteoporosis, however, they have been associated with rare, severe side effects such as osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femoral fractures.

As a result, bisphosphonate drug holidays have become common in clinical practice though currently, there are minimal data on the safe duration of these drug holidays. We sought to further characterize the clinical and laboratory parameters associated with increased fracture risk in patients on bisphosphonate drug holiday.

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Sciatica: Biomarker Demonstrates Inflammation, Not Just Compression of Nerve Roots

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

“osteopathic treatment for sciatica” by betterhealthosteopathy is licensed under PDM 3.0Daniel Albrecht, PhD
Research Fellow in Radiology, Harvard Medical School
Research Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: A great deal of preclinical work in animal models of pain has established that activation of peripheral immune cells or, in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), immune cells called “glia” (microglia and astrocytes) play a key role in the establishment and/or maintenance of persistent pain. For instance, if you pharmacologically block activation of these cells in the nervous system, you are able to reduce/inhibit/prevent pain behaviors, e.g. in animals who have received a nerve injury.

This observation is very exciting, because it suggests that blocking neuroinflammation may be a viable way of treating pain. However, the evidence linking human chronic pain with neuroinflammation has so far been limited.

In this study we show, for the first time, that patients with chronic sciatica (that is, back pain that shoots down the leg) demonstrate elevations in the levels of a protein called the translocator protein (TSPO) in the spinal cord and in the nerve roots.

Because TSPO is a marker of neuroinflammation, our results suggest that sciatica is associated with neuroinflammation.

While on average patients do show elevations in the levels of the TSPO, we also saw significant variability across individuals. Importantly, patients that show stronger elevations (in the nerve roots) were those who benefit the most from receiving a local anti-inflammatory treatment (epidural spinal injection). This makes sense: patients whose nerve roots are inflamed benefit from an anti-inflammatory treatment. Those whose nerve roots aren’t inflamed, don’t receive the same benefit. In the latter case, the source of the inflammation and pain may not be the nerve roots, but may be the spinal cord, or, as we showed in a previous paper (Loggia et al., Brain 2015), the brain.  Continue reading

Osteoporosis Drug Has Potential To Fight Triple Negative Breast Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Chenfang Dong, Ph.D & M.D.
Professor
Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology
Zhejiang University School of Medicine, 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Basal-like breast cancer (BLBC), which generally falls into the triple-negative breast cancer subtype, is associated with a poor clinical outcome due to few treatment options and poor therapeutic response; thus there is a pressing need to elucidate the determinants of aggressiveness in BLBC and identify potential therapeutic targets for this challenging disease.

By analyzing gene expression profiles of breast cancer in multiple publicly available datasets that contain over 5000 cases, we have identified that UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase (UGT8), a key enzyme in the sulfatide biosynthetic pathway, promotes BLBC progression by activating sulfatide-αVβ5 axis.

Importantly, we identify that zoledronic acid (ZA), a marketed drug for treating osteoporosis and bone metastasis, is a direct inhibitor of UGT8, which has the potential to become a valuable targeted drug for treating Basal-like breast cancer.  Continue reading

Which NSAID for Knee Pain Works Best?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“dog” by Neil Mullins is licensed under CC BY 2.0Deborah S. Cummins, PhD

Director, Research, Quality and Scientific Affairs
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
On behalf of the researchers:
David Jevsevar, MD, MBA; Gregory A. Brown, MD, PHD, and Deborah S. Cummins, PhD

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: It is estimated that individuals have a 45% risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) in their lifetime. As a result of the shifting demographics of the US, where an increasing percentage of the population is older than 65, the burden of knee OA will continue to increase. To help deal with this burden, effective nonsurgical treatments are needed to manage knee OA symptoms associated with pain and function before surgical intervention becomes necessary. To determine which non-surgical options are best, we performed a network meta-analysis exploring mixed treatment comparisons for nonsurgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis in order to effectively rank the various nonsurgical treatment options from best to worst.

Our network meta-analysis suggests that the single most effective nonsurgical treatment for improving knee function is function is naproxen, followed by diclofenac, celecoxib, and ibuprofen. When considering pain and function together, our data suggest that naproxen is the most effective treatment followed by IA corticosteroid injection.

The single most effective short-term (4-6 weeks) treatment for decreasing pain is intra-articular (IA) corticosteroid injection, followed by ibuprofen, IA platelet rich plasma, and naproxen. Additionally, intra-articular hyaluronic acid injections never achieved a rank in the top five treatments for pain, function, or combined pain and function. An analysis of 12 articles also found that HA is not significantly different than IA placebo in effect.

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Every Pitch Should Count

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Pitching Crop” by slgckgc is licensed under CC BY 2.0Jason L. Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Assistant Professor│Divisions of PM&R, Sports Medicine, & Research
Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation
Co-Medical Director Adolescent & High School Outreach Program
University of Florida College of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Throwing injuries are common in baseball and can be caused by excessive pitch counts, year-round pitching, and pitching with arm pain and fatigue. Despite the evidence, pitching injuries among high school players have not decreased. With a multitude of research in overhead throwers, yet the volume of overuse throwing injuries not decreasing, our team suspected there was a missing workload factor in baseball pitchers. Therefore, our team conducted research to determine whether an important factor was being overlooked: volume of pitches thrown during warm-up between innings and bullpen activity in high school varsity baseball pitchers.

In the study, our team counted all pitches thrown off a mound during varsity high school baseball games played by 34 different high schools in North Central Florida during the 2017 season. After counting nearly 14,000 pitches in 115 pitch outings, our team found that 42% of the pitches thrown off a mound were not accounted for in the pitch counts, and that there is a large variability of bullpen pitches being thrown from pitcher to pitcher. Even with a greater focus on pitch counts as a way to prevent injuries, a substantial number of pitches are going unaccounted for in high school players as part of warm-up and bullpen activity.

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How a PET Can Save Your Heart

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr-W-Robert-Taylor

Dr. Taylor

Robert Taylor, MD, PhD
Marcus Chair in Vascular Medicine
Executive Vice Chair, Medicine
Director, Division of Cardiology
Professor of Medicine and
Biomedical Engineering
Emory University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The early identification and localization of bacterial infections is a critical step for initiating effective treatment.   This is particularly challenging in the setting of infections associated with implanted medical devices.  We have developed a highly specific probe for bacteria that is based on the fact that bacteria have a specific system for taking up maltodextrins which are polysaccharides that mammalian cells cannot take up directly.  We can label this probe with either a fluorescent of radioactive tag that allows visualization of the bacteria.

In the current article, we have used an animal model of implantable cardiac devices to demonstrate that our probe is very specific and sensitive for detecting bacterial infections.  It is worth noting that these are subclinical infections that could not be detected by any other means except for surgical removal.

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One or Two Surgeries To Treat an Infected Hip Joint?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

“Check out this sweet artificial hip! (no I don't need one...)” by dennis crowley is licensed under CC BY 2.0

An example of one type of an artificial hip

Dr Setor Kunutsor PhD
Research Fellow
Musculoskeletal Research Unit
Bristol Medical School

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Hip replacement is a very common operation that is effective at providing pain relief and improving mobility. Infection is a fortunately infrequent but devastating complication that can occur following joint replacement.

Currently, two main types of surgical procedures are used in treating these infections – one-stage and two-stage revision strategies. In the two-stage procedure, the existing artificial joint is removed in one operation and the patient is treated for several months with antibiotics. A new joint is then inserted in a second operation. In the one-stage procedure, the artificial joint is removed along with all infected tissue and a new one inserted in the same operation. The two-stage procedure has been in use for decades and was regarded as the most effective treatment. There has been an increase in the use of the one-stage procedure as it has also been claimed to be very effective at treating infection. There has been a lot of controversy among orthopaedic surgeons as to which is the best way to treat infected hip replacements. Several studies have been conducted on the topic, but the findings have been inconsistent. Some claim the two-stage to be more effective and others claim the one-stage procedure is. Currently the majority of studies claim the two-stage is better; but no study has been conducted that compares these procedures head-to-head to decide if one is better or if they achieve the same results. Due to the lack of evidence, some surgeons are reluctant to use the one-stage strategy. There was therefore a need to compare the effectiveness of the two surgical strategies using an appropriate study design.

We conducted a study which involved collecting and bringing all previous data together under one umbrella. The process is known as “Individual Participant Data meta-analysis”. It involved communicating with surgeons in different countries all over the world and inviting them to contribute data. We called the name of the group “The Global Infection Orthopaedic Management (INFORM) Collaboration”.

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Ankle Fracture: Close Casting Can Be Alternative To Surgery For Older Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
David Keene DPhil
NIHR Postdoctoral Research Fellow
NDORMS Research Fellow in Trauma Rehabilitation
Critical Care, Trauma and Rehabilitation Trials Group
Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences
University of Oxford 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Our clinical trial comparing close contact casting to the usual internal fixation surgery for unstable ankle fractures in older adults found that ankle function at six months was equivalent. There was more abnormal healing of the fracture seen on radiographs (malunion) in the casting group (15 percent, compared to 3 percent for surgery) so we aimed to investigate the ankle function outcomes in the longer term. We found that equivalence in ankle function between initial close contact casting and surgery was maintained at three years. 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our findings indicate that close contact casting is an appropriate alternative treatment to surgery for older people with an unstable ankle fracture. These longer-term outcomes will help surgeons and patients to make informed decisions about the right course of action for them. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Future research will explore if there are certain types of older patients that do well after close contact casting or surgery. 

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: It is worth highlighting that the initial close contact casting was applied in the operating room under anesthesia.

There were no conflicts of interest. 

Citations:

Keene DJ, Lamb SE, Mistry D, et al. Three-Year Follow-up of a Trial of Close Contact Casting vs Surgery for Initial Treatment of Unstable Ankle Fractures in Older Adults. JAMA. 2018;319(12):1274–1276. doi:10.1001/jama.2018.0811

 

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Patient Migration Makes it Difficult To Track Revisions After Total Joint Replacement

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Terence J. Gioe, MD
American Joint Replacement Registry, Rosemont, IL
UCSF School of Medicine,
San Francisco VA Health Care System 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Hospital-based or regional registries are typically limited in their catchment area, making loss to follow-up a major concern when patients move out of the area or otherwise receive subsequent medical care outside of the original hospital network. The American Joint Replacement Registry (AJRR), a part of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ (AAOS) registries portfolio, has the goal of tracking total joint arthroplasty (TJA) patients nationally across the US, but currently captures only approximately 28% of annual TJA procedures. Until a nationwide network of reporting hospitals is established that covers at least 90% of all TJA procedures, loss to follow-up due to migration will be a key potential limitation of large-scale studies on implant performance in the US.

Assessment of loss to follow-up can provide an essential understanding of the migration patterns of TJA patients, and help to improve recruitment and enrollment efforts of the AJRR. The magnitude and characteristics of patient migration following TJA have not previously been studied in the US.  Continue reading

Surface Topography Can Assess Improvements in QoL Following Scoliosis Surgery

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Baron  Lonner, MD Professor of Orthopaedics Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Dr. Lonner

Baron  Lonner, MD
Professor of Orthopaedics
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: 2-3% of adolescents have idiopathic scoliosis and 1 in 10 of these individuals will require surgery to correct severe scoliosis which if left untreated can lead to back pain and disability as well as pulmonary (breathing) problems later in life. For the adolescent with curvatures that require surgical treatment, body image and self esteem are big issues as they are for all adolescents going through their developmental stages.

Scoliosis has an impact on body shape, which is seen by the affected individual looking in the mirror as well as by their peers and those around them. This can lead to self esteem and body image disturbance issues. We set out to explore the body shape distortions that occur with scoliosis, that are not depicted by x-rays that are standardly used to assess curvatures of the spine, and the improvements in parameters of body shape that occur with corrective surgery. We can assess body shape directly through surface topography imaging, that is light-based, thus, not involving x-ray exposure. This technology (Diers Formetrics) uses the same scientific methodology that is used to create modern topographical maps through satellite imagery. We found dramatic improvements in body shape asymmetry with surgery that correlated with some improvements in quality of life for the adolescent in this cohort of 23 patients as well as with the improvements in curvatures evaluated by x-rays.  Continue reading