Standardized EEG Reporting Helps Predict Risk of Seizures

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Andres Rodriguez Ruiz, MD</strong> Clinical Neurophysiology and Neurology Emory School of Medicine

Dr. Andres Rodriguez Ruiz

Andres Rodriguez Ruiz, MD
Clinical Neurophysiology and Neurology
Emory School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The Critical Care EEG monitoring research consortium (CCEMRC) was established with the goal of promoting collaboration and research among healthcare institutions highly involved in continuous EEG monitoring of critically ill patients. This group together with the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) established the standardized critical care EEG terminology that allowed uniform reporting of EEG findings in critically ill patients. As part of this effort, a database was developed for collection and clinical reporting of such EEG findings and was adopted for daily clinical use by Yale University, Emory University and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Prior retrospective reports have acknowledged an association between periodic discharges and seizures. However, many of these reports were small series and did not include specific characteristics of these patterns. Our goal was to ascertain whether features of periodic and rhythmic patterns such as location (generalized vs. lateralized), frequency and prevalence influenced seizure risk in a large cohort of critically ill adults.

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National Trends and Outcomes of Embryo Donation

Jennifer F. Kawwass, MD, FACOG Assistant Professor, Emory Reproductive Center Director of Third Party Reproduction, Emory Reproductive Center

Dr. Jennifer F. Kawwass

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Jennifer F. Kawwass, MD, FACOG

Assistant Professor, Emory Reproductive Center
Director of Third Party Reproduction, Emory Reproductive Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: With the increasing use of assisted reproductive technology (ART), the number of cryopreserved embryos in storage has increased, as residual viable embryos from an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle may be frozen for future use. Each embryo maintains attributes reflective of the age of the female at time of the original oocyte retrieval. Embryo donation, a form of third-party reproduction, involves donation without compensation of previously formed embryos to another couple for implantation.

Limited published data exist detailing outcomes of donor embryo cycles. Patients and clinicians would benefit from information specific to donor embryo cycles to inform fertility treatment options, counselling, and clinical decision-making. We sought to quantify trends in donor embryo cycles in the United States, to characterize donor embryo recipients, and to report transfer, pregnancy, and birth outcomes of donor embryo transfers.

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Children With Autism Miss Social Cues of Eye Contact

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Warren Jones, PhD Director of Research, Marcus Autism Center Children's Healthcare of Atlanta CHOA Distinguished Chair in Autism Asst. Professor, Dept. of Pediatrics Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, Georgia 30329

Dr. Warren Jones

Warren Jones, PhD
Director of Research, Marcus Autism Center
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
CHOA Distinguished Chair in Autism
Asst. Professor, Dept. of Pediatrics
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta, Georgia 30329

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: These results help clarify an important and longstanding question in autism: why do children with autism look less at other people’s eyes?

Two ideas for reduced eye contact in autism have been proposed:
– One idea is that children with autism avoid eye contact because they find it stressful and negative.
– The other idea is that children with autism look less at other people’s eyes because the social cues from the eyes are not perceived as particularly meaningful or important.

This study is important because each idea reflects a very different understanding of what autism is. And maybe even more importantly, each idea reflects a very different view about the right treatment approach to autism and to reduced eye contact in autism.

To answer this question, we used eye-tracking technology to study how 86 children with and without autism paid attention to other people’s eyes.

Children were tested when they were just two years old, at their time of initial diagnosis.

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The Health ABC Study: Simple Exercise Test Predicts Heart Failure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Vasiliki Georgiopoulou MD MPH PhD Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) Emory University School of Medicine

Dr. Vasiliki Georgiopoulou

Vasiliki Georgiopoulou MD MPH PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology)
Emory University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Although existing evidence suggests that more exercise capacity is associated with lower risk of CV disease and death, we don’t know whether more exercise capacity would lead to lower risk for heart failure also. This would be especially important for older adults, who are the group with the highest risk to develop heart failure. We used the data of a cohort study to test this association.

The exercise capacity was evaluated by a walking test that is easy to perform – the long-distance corridor walk test. We observed that older adults who were able to complete the test had the lowest risk to develop heart failure and the lowest mortality rates, when compared with those who were not able to complete the test and those who could not do the test for medical reasons. We also observed that changes in exercise capacity 4 years later did not predict subsequent heart failure or mortality – perhaps because less fit older patients had already developed heart failure or had died.

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Majority of US Adults Have At Least One Chronic Health Condition

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Elizabeth Walker, PhD, MPH, MAT Research Assistant Professor Assistant Director of Evidence-based Learning Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education Rollins School of Public Health Emory University

Dr. Elizabeth Walker

Elizabeth Walker, PhD, MPH, MAT
Research Assistant Professor
Assistant Director of Evidence-based Learning
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education
Rollins School of Public Health
Emory University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Previous research has shown that many adults in the United States have one or more chronic health condition; however, not much was known about multimorbidities – having multiple chronic conditions – among people with mental disorders. We used nationally representative data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health to determine the patterns of co-occurrence of mental illness, substance abuse and/or dependence, and chronic medical conditions. We also examined the association between the cumulative burden of these conditions, as well as living in poverty, and self-rated health.

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Costs of Prescription Opioid Overdose, Abuse and Dependence Top $75 Billion

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Curtis Florence, PhD National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and Assistant professor, Department of Health Policy Management Rollins School of Public Health at Emory

Curtis Florence, PhD

Curtis Florence, PhD
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and
Assistant professor, Department of Health Policy Management
Rollins School of Public Health
Emory

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?
Response:

  • This study presents most recent CDC estimates of the economic burden of prescription opioid abuse, dependence and overdose in the United States.
  • In 2013, over 16,000 persons died of prescription opioid overdoses, and almost 2 million people met the diagnostic criteria for abuse and/or dependence.

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Stem Cells May Be Stimulated in Women With Chest Pain But Normal Coronary Arteries

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Arshed A. Quyyumi MD; FRCP

Dr. Arshed Auyyumi

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Arshed A. Quyyumi MD; FRCP
Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology
Emory University School of Medicine
Co-Director, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute
Atlanta GA 30322

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Circulating progenitor or stem cells were discovered in adults 15 years ago. We now know that they may be stimulated by injury or ischemia, and they go down in number and function with aging, particularly when aging is associated with risk factors.

Women with chest pain despite normal coronary arteries are thought to have ischemia because of microvascular dysfunction. We found that these women, with the worst microvascular function (measured as coronary flow reserve), had higher levels of circulating stem or progenitor cells. This implies that the mild ischemia they are having during their normal daily life, leads to stimulation of their stem cells. Also, the vascular abnormality may be a stimulus for repair.

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Model Developed For Prediction of Sudden Cardiac Death

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alvaro Alonso, MD, PhD Associate Professor Department of Epidemiology Rollins School of Public Health Emory University Atlanta, GA

Dr. Alvaro Alonso

Alvaro Alonso, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Epidemiology
Rollins School of Public Health
Emory University
Atlanta, GA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major public health problem. Each year, 300,000-400,000 Americans experience SCD and, in more than half of these cases, sudden cardiac death is the first manifestation of heart disease. To date, however, we lack effective strategies to identify those at higher risk of developing sudden cardiac death so targeted preventive strategies can be applied.

In this study, we develop and validate the first model for the prediction of SCD in ~18,000 adults without a prior history of cardiovascular disease. We show that information on demographic variables (age, sex, race), some traditional cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, elevated blood pressure, diabetes, HDL cholesterol) as well as some factors more specifically related to SCD causes (electrocardiogram QT interval) and novel biomarkers (albumin, potassium in blood, kidney function) can be leveraged to predict risk of SCD and identify individuals more likely to suffer this event.

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EKG Plus Framingham Score Improves Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Amit J. Shah MD MSCR Research Assistant Professor Assistant Professor of Epidemiology Rollins School of Public Health Emory University Adjunct appointment in Medicine (Cardiology) Atlanta VA Medical Center

Dr. Amit Shah

Dr. Amit J. Shah MD MSCR
Research Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor of Epidemiology
Rollins School of Public Health
Emory University
Adjunct appointment in Medicine (Cardiology)
Atlanta VA Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Nearly ½ of sudden cardiac deaths occur in individuals who were not aware that they had heart disease; this increases the need for primary prevention. We studied whether the electrocardiogram could be a useful tool in helping to measure risk of cardiovascular disease in approximately 10,000 community-based adults aged 40-74 with a simple risk equation that is based on age, sex, and 3 numbers from the ECG: heart rate, T-axis, and QT interval. We found that such an equation estimates risk as well as the Framingham risk equation, which is the standard of care (based on traditional risk factors like smoking and diabetes). When combining both the Framingham and ECG risk assessments together, the accuracy improved significantly, with a net 25% improvement in the risk classification of cardiovascular death compared to using the Framingham equation alone.

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High Dose Statins Reduce Amputations In PAD

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Shipra Arya MD, SM Assistant Professor, Division of Vascular Surgery Emory University School of Medicine Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Adjunct) Rollins School of Public Health Staff Physician, Atlanta VA Medical Center Director, AVAMC Vascular Lab and Endovascular Therapy

Dr. Shipra Arya

Shipra Arya MD, SM
Assistant Professor, Division of Vascular Surgery
Emory University School of Medicine
Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Adjunct)
Rollins School of Public Health
Staff Physician, Atlanta VA Medical Center
Director, AVAMC Vascular Lab and Endovascular Therapy 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Arya: Peripheral Arterial Disease is the next cardiovascular epidemic. It is poorly recognized and not adequately treated compared to heart disease – and research is lacking on the optimal use of statins for PAD patients. Very few randomized clinical trials have been done specifically in PAD patients to assess the impact of statins on cardiovascular outcomes and none on limb related outcomes. The 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for cholesterol lowering medications recommends high intensity statins for PAD patients extrapolated from the level 2 and 3 evidence and empirically based on CAD and stroke data.

In this study we looked at the amputation and mortality risk based on statin dosage in a large cohort of patients from the VA population and found that high intensity statins are associated with a significant reduction in limb loss (~30%) and mortality (~25%) in PAD patients followed by a smaller risk reduction [~23% for amputation risk reduction and 20% reduction in mortality risk] by low-moderate intensity statins as compared to no statin therapy.

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Bisphosphonate in First Year of HIV Treatment Reduces Bone Loss

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Igho Ofotokun MD MSc Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia Grady Healthcare System, Atlanta, Georgia

Dr. Igho Ofotukun

Dr. Igho Ofotokun MD MSc
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
Grady Healthcare System, Atlanta, Georgia

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Ofotokun:  This work is focused on preventing further bone loss in HIV-infected patients and thus reducing the risk of future bone fractures. HIV infection is associated with a state of enhanced bone loss. HIV treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) further worsens rather than improve bone loss. Almost all HAART regimens that have been examined have been associated with bone loss. The consequence of this skeletal assualt is markedly elevated fracture prevalence among individuals living with HIV across a wide age range.

It turns that the predominance of HAART associated bone loss occur within the first year of initiating therapy. In this study, we administered a single dose of 5 mg IV zoledronic acid, a long-acting bisphosphonate at the same time of HAART initiation to prevent HAART associated bone loss. At this dose, zoledronic acid prevented enhance bone resorption in all participants and completely blunted bone mineral density loss over the 48 weeks study follow up period.

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Minorities Place Less Trust In Their Doctors

Abigail Sewell PhD Assistant Professor of Sociology Emory University

Dr. Abigail Sewell

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Abigail Sewell PhD
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Emory University

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?
Dr. Sewell: Ethnoracial minorities report poorer quality of care than do whites. However, one key dimension of health care quality – trust in one’s personal physician – indicates mixed associations with race. This study examines five dimensions of the patient-physician relationship independently of each other to identify the aspects of health care where minorities feel most alienated from their doctors.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Sewell: The results of the study show that Blacks and Latinos are less likely to believe that their doctors really care about them as a person than are Whites.

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