Hematuria, and Early Cancer Detection, Not Uncommon With Anticoagulation Medications

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Robert Nam, MD, FRCSC Ajmera Family Chair in Urologic Oncology Professor of Surgery University of Toronto Head, Genitourinary Cancer Site Odette Cancer Centre Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Dr. Nam

Robert Nam, MD, FRCSC
Ajmera Family Chair in Urologic Oncology
Professor of Surgery
University of Toronto
Head, Genitourinary Cancer Site
Odette Cancer Centre
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The well known potentially lethal complications of anti-thrombotic medications of cerebral and gastrointestinal bleeding complications are well known.  However, more common bleeding related complications are not well described .  In particular, gross hematuria is a well known complication of these medications but its frequency and severity is unknown.  We sought to characterize this association among a large population-based cohort consisting of over 2.5 million patients from the Province of Ontario, Canada, using hematuria-related complications was endpoints.  These were defined as undergoing invasive urologic procedures, hospital admissions or emergency visits for gross hematuria.

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Pubic Hair Grooming–Related Injuries Surprisingly Common

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Thomas W. Gaither, BS
Department of Urology
University of California, San Francisco
General Hospital, San Francisco

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We study genitourinary trauma and reconstruction. This study was motivated from a previous study showing that Emergency Room visits due to grooming were increasing over the past nine year. We sought to better characterize who was at most risk for grooming injuries. We found that grooming is extremely common in both men and women and minor injuries occur in about 25% of groomers. Surprisingly, a little over one percent sought medical care due to their injury. Participants at most risk our those who remove all of their pubic hair frequently ( as opposed to those who just trim). We did not find any instruments that were necessarily putting participants at risk for injury.

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Electroacupuncture Reduced Leakage in Stress Urinary Incontinence

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Baoyan Liu, MD
Guang’an Men Hospital
China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences
Beijing, China

Patient with Electroacupuncture

Patient with Electroacupuncture

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence(SUI) is as high as 49% and varies according to the population studied and the definition of stress urinary incontinence.

SUI causes psychological burden, affects relationships, lowers physical productivity, and decreases quality of life in women. Yet, few effective therapies are available for treating stress urinary incontinence.

In this randomized clinical trial that included 504 women, the mean decrease in urine leakage, measured by the 1-hour pad test from baseline to week 6, was 9.9 g with
electroacupuncture vs 2.6 g with sham electroacupuncture, a significant difference.

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MRI Guided Prostate Biopsies Can Improve Care and Reduce Costs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Vikas Gulani, MD, PhD Director, MRI, UH Cleveland Medical Center Associate Professor, Radiology, CWRU School of Medicine

Dr. Gulani

Vikas Gulani, MD, PhD
Director, MRI, UH Cleveland Medical Center
Associate Professor, Radiology, CWRU School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We wanted to learn if performing MR before prostate biopsy, followed by MR guided strategies for biopsy, are cost effective for the diagnosis of prostate cancer in men who have not previously undergone a biopsy and who have a suspicion of prostate cancer.

The most significant findings are as follows:

We found that all three MR guided strategies for lesion targeting (cognitive targeting, MR-ultrasound fusion targeting, and in-gantry targeting) are cost effective, as the increase in net health benefits as measured by addition of quality adjusted life years (QALY), outweigh the additional costs according to commonly accepted willingness to pay thresholds in the United States.

Cognitive targeting was the most cost effective. In-gantry biopsy added the most health benefit, and this additional benefit was cost-effective as well.

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Genomic Profile Can Improve Confidence in Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Bela S. Denes, MD, FACS Senior Director Medical Affairs UROLOGY Genomic Health Inc. Redwood City, CA. 94063

Dr. Bela S. Denes

Bela S. Denes, MD, FACS
Senior Director Medical Affairs
UROLOGY
Genomic Health Inc.
Redwood City, CA. 94063

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This is a prospective community based non-interventional study designed to provide information on the utility of Oncotype GPS in the management of men presenting with a new diagnosis of clinically localized low risk prostate cancer. We sought to understand the impact of incorporating a molecular marker into the shared treatment decision in practices already well versed in Active Surveillance (AS) as measured by persistence on surveillance at 2 years as well as a number of patient reported outcomes. The current publication reports on the results of a one year pre-specified interim analysis.

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Malignancies More Common In Men With BRCA Germline Mutations

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Roy Mano, MD and
David Margel, MD, PhD
Department of Urology, Rabin Medical Center
Petach Tikva, Israel

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: According to previous reports, male BRCA mutation carriers have a higher risk of developing malignancies of the prostate, pancreas, breast, colon and melanoma. While malignancy screening protocols for female BRCA carriers are well established and widely implemented, little is known about the optimal screening protocol for male BRCA carriers, and current screening protocols focus on malignancies of the breast and prostate rather than offer a comprehensive screening protocol for all BRCA associated malignancies.

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Minimally Invasive Rezum® Radiofrequency System Treats Obese Men With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Caused by BPH


MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Nikhil K. Gupta
and
Kevin McVary, MD, FACS
Professor, Department of Surgery
Chair, Division of Urology
Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Pre Treatment.jpg: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an enlargement of the prostate gland, affecting 12 million men in the U.S., with nearly 800,000 newly diagnosed each year. An enlarged prostate squeezes down on the urethra causing lower urinary tract symptoms.

Pre Treatment.jpg: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an enlargement of the prostate gland, affecting 12 million men in the U.S., with nearly 800,000 newly diagnosed each year. An enlarged prostate squeezes down on the urethra causing lower urinary tract symptoms.

Response: Male lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, or LUTS due to BPH, have most commonly been treated with a combination of medication, such as alpha-blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, and surgery, such as transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) and Greenlight photovaporization of prostate (PVP). These treatments, however, have potentially serious adverse and sexual side effects. Minimally invasive surgical therapies (MIST) for LUTS due to BPH have tried to thread the needle between medications and invasive surgery, giving effective relief of symptoms with minimal anesthetic need while preserving sexual function. Previously developed MISTs have been unable to provide durable relief of symptoms, causing patients to undergo multiple treatments in a short period of time, and have been limited by prostate size and conformation, e.g. the inability to treat a middle lobe or median bar. LUTS due to BPH is also very strongly and likely causally linked with obesity, and obesity seems to have an effect on the efficacy of treatment as well, as obesity affects response to medication and tends to dampen the treatment effect of TURP.

Convective Radiofrequency Water Vapor Energy ablation of the prostate, named Rezūm®, is a new MIST that uses radiofrequency to generate energy in the form of water vapor. The water vapor acts as a convective energy source and, once injected into the treatment area, distributes itself evenly within the treated tissue, causing uniform necrosis througout the treated area. This mechanism using convection is in contrast to previous technologies using conductive heat energy, which created a heat gradient with tissue closest to the heat source receiving the largest amount of energy and tissue farthest from the heat source receiving almost no energy. Thus conductive energy has a different effect on different parts of the treated area. With Rezūm, MRI studies have shown that the water vapor creates a uniform treatment effect while staying within collagen barriers, obeying natural tissue planes and affecting only the intended treatment areas.

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of Rezūm in treatment of LUTS due to BPH, examine the treatment’s effect on sexual function, and to determine whether obesity affected treatment efficacy.

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Flibanserin- Addyi -Improved Sexual Health in Women With Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Michael Krychman, MD Executive Director: The Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship, Medical Director: Sexual Medicine at Hoag Hospital Newport Beach CA Clinical faculty member University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Krychman

Dr. Michael Krychman, MD
Executive Director: The Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship,
Medical Director: Sexual Medicine at Hoag Hospital Newport Beach CA
Clinical faculty member
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This post hoc analysis pooled data from three 24-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies (VIOLET, DAISY, and BEGONIA) of flibanserin in premenopausal women with acquired, generalized HSDD5-7. Patients who received flibanserin 100 mg once daily at bedtime (qhs) or placebo were included in the analysis. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) consists of 19 items across 6 domains. Scores range from 2 to 36. Higher scores indicate better sexual functioning. Scores under 26 indicate sexual dysfunction. Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate changes from the first week to week 24 in the FSFI domain and total scores were compared for flibanserin 100 mg qhs versus placebo. For patients who discontinued study participation prior to week 24, the last postbaseline observation was carried forward (LOCF).

Results found that treatment with flibanserin 100 mg qhs produced statistically significant improvement, relative to placebo, on all domains of the FSFI (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain) in premenopausal women with acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD).

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E-cigarette Smoke Increases Bladder Cancer Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Moon-shong Tang, Ph</strong>D Professor of Environmental Medicine, Pathology and Medicine New York University School of Medicine Tuxedo Park, New York 10987

Dr. Moon-shong Tang

Moon-shong Tang, PhD
Professor of Environmental Medicine, Pathology and Medicine
New York University Langone School of Medicine
Tuxedo Park, New York 10987

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: E-cigarettes (E-cigs) are designed to deliver the stimulant nicotine through aerosols, commonly referred as vapors. Nicotine is dissolved in organic solvents such as glycerin and propylene glycol. The nicotine is then aerosolized by controlled electric heating. E-cigs do not use tobacco leaves and E-cig smoke does not involve the burning process. Hence, E-cig smoke (ECS) contains only nicotine and the gas phase of the solvent. Because ECS contains neither carcinogens nor allergens or odors from the tobacco burning process, E-cigs have been promoted as an invention that can deliver a TS ‘high’ without TS negative effects. The population of E-cig users is rapidly rising, particularly in young adults. It has been estimated that 16% of high school students are E-cig smokers. Therefore, the health effects of E-cig smoke, particularly its carcinogenicity, deserve careful scrutiny.

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Active Surveillance Can Be Expanded To Select Group of Younger Men With Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Keyan Salari, MD, PhD Resident in Urologic Surgery Keyan Salari is currently completing his residency in the Harvard Program in Urologic Surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and is conducting post-doctoral research in cancer genomics in the Garraway Lab at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MI

Dr. Keyan Salari

Keyan Salari, MD, PhD
Resident in Urologic Surgery
Keyan Salari is currently completing his residency in the Harvard Program in Urologic Surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and is conducting post-doctoral research in cancer genomics in the
Garraway Lab at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Active surveillance is an effective strategy addressing the problem of over treatment of clinically indolent prostate cancer, but data on the role of active surveillance in younger men is limited. Younger men diagnosed with prostate cancer are typically counseled to undergo treatment as opposed to surveillance of their prostate cancer.

To potentially expand the role of active surveillance to younger patient populations, we undertook this study evaluating the outcomes of younger men under 60 years of age who elected to pursue active surveillance of their prostate cancer.

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New Prostate Cancer Specific Assay May Reduce Need For Biopsies

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eric A. Klein, MD</strong> Chairman, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute Cleveland Clinic

Dr. Klein

Eric A. Klein, MD
Chairman, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute
Cleveland Clinic

MedicalResearch.com: Which of these results did you find most interesting or surprising?

Response: What’s most interesting is that the IsoPSA assay redefines how PSA is measured, which links it more closely to the underlying biology of cancer. Current assays measure only the concentration of PSA, which can be affected by conditions other than cancer – BPH most commonly, but also infection and inflammation – which limits its diagnostic accuracy for finding cancer. Its been known for several decades that PSA exists in multiple different forms in the bloodstream in patients with prostate cancer.

These novel molecules arise because cancer cells have deranged cellular metabolism that result in the generation of new species of PSA, making their measurement more tightly linked to the presence or absence of cancer and even the presence of high grade cancer (where cellular metabolism is even more disordered).

The IsoPSA assay is the first assay to measure all of these isoforms and thus has better diagnostic accuracy for cancer.

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Psychiatric Side Effects of 5 Alpha Reductase Inhibitors for BPH

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Blayne Welk, MD, FRCSC Assistant Professor of Surgery Western University

Dr. Blayne Welk

Blayne Welk, MD, FRCSC
Assistant Professor of Surgery
Western University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Concerns have been raised by regulatory agencies and patients about possible serious psychiatric side effects associated with the use of 5 alpha reductase inhibitors. These medications can be used for both enlarged prostates and alopecia.

We used administrative data to assess for potential psychiatric side effects associated with finasteride and dutasteride usage in older men with benign prostatic enlargement.

In our study we found that there was no increased risk of suicide associated with the use of these medications. However, there was a small increase in both self-harm and new onset depression associated with the use of 5 alpha reductase inhibitors.
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Prostate Artery Embolization Is Less Invasive Choice For BPH Treatment

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. João Martins Pisco, MD PhD Hospital St. Louis, International Prostate Medical Center Lisbon, Portugal

Dr. João Martins Pisco

Dr. João Martins Pisco, MD PhD
Hospital St. Louis, International Prostate Medical Center
Lisbon, Portugal

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Enlarged prostate, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is one of the most common prostate problems occurring in men older than 50. According to the National Institutes of Health, as many as 14 million men in the U.S. had symptoms suggestive of BPH, which can affect 50 percent of men between 51 and 60 years of age and up to 90 percent of men older than 80. A few years ago, Dr. João Martins Pisco developed the minimally invasive treatment, known as prostate artery embolization, to treat BPH. The study that Dr. Pisco presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology on March 8 is the first of its kind – a study with 1,000 patients with long-term efficacy data.

Between March 2007 and March 2016, Dr. Pisco and his team performed PAE on 1,000 men who averaged 67 years of age. All patients were evaluated in the short term (one, three, and six months), 807 patients were seen through the medium term (every six months between six months and three years), and 406 patients were evaluated long term (every year after three years).

During each evaluation, the men’s symptoms were measured by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), which tests for the blockage of urine flow, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), which assesses erectile dysfunction. Researchers also measured the size of the prostate and the amount of urine left in the bladder after urination. They also evaluated the peak urinary flow rate and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, a test used to screen for prostate cancer.

MedicalResearch.com:  What are the main findings?

Response:  The data from these measures revealed at the short-term mark that the treatment had an 89 percent cumulative success rate—measuring the success across all variables through the given testing period. The 807 men evaluated at the medium-term mark had an 82 percent success rate. And of the 406 patients measured at the long-term mark, 78 percent were considered cumulative successes.

In an additional analysis, researchers found that among 112 patients who also suffered acute urinary retention (AUR) before undergoing PAE, 106 or 94.6 percent had their catheter removed between two days and three months after treatment. At medium-term and long-term follow up, 95 of the 112 (84.8 percent) and 89 of the 112 (78.5 percent) did not experience any recurrence of their AUR.

The team also performed PAE in 210 patients who had limited treatment options due to extreme enlargement of the prostate (larger than 100 cm³). Of these men, 84 percent experienced cumulative success at short-term evaluation and 76.2 percent at medium- and long-term. The normal size of a prostate is 15 cm3 to 30 cm3.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response:  Prostate artery embolization gives men with BPH a treatment option that is less invasive than other therapies and allows them to return to their normal lives sooner. Time and time again, Dr. Pisco has seen patients who are relieved to find out about PAE because they are not able to tolerate medications for BPH due to their side effects. These men also don’t want traditional surgery because it involves greater risks, has possible sexual side effects, and has a recovery time that is relatively long compared to PAE, which is generally performed under local anesthesia and on an outpatient basis.

Prostate artery embolization should also be presented to patients who are exploring options to resolve their BPH.

That said, PAE may not be appropriate for all patients, such as those with advanced arterial atherosclerosis that may be due to smoking or diabetes. Patients should speak with an interventional radiologist or other members of their care team to discuss treatment options.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: As a next step, Dr. Pisco and his team are now conducting a study comparing the effectiveness of PAE to a sham – or placebo—treatment to address any possible placebo effect that may have occurred during Pisco’s research with these 1,000 patients.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Prostate artery embolization is a safe and effective treatment and these data demonstrate the efficacy of the therapy in the long term. It’s important that patients know about this therapy as they explore how to resolve their BPH. 

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Society of Interventional Radiology abstract discussing:

Prostate artery embolization for BPH

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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Clinical Outcomes Following a Low-Suspicion MRI for Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lars Boesen MD PhD Department of Urology Herlev Gentofte University Hospital Herlev

Dr. Boessen

Lars Boesen MD PhD
Department of Urology
Herlev Gentofte University Hospital
Herlev

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) traditionally used for detecting prostate cancer (PCa) are prone to sampling errors due to difficulties in target identification. Therefore, concerns about the possibility of missing significant prostate cancer result in men with negative biopsy results frequently undergo repeated biopsies, leading to increased medical costs, patient anxiety and morbidity.

Multiparametric MRI (mp-MRI) has become increasingly important in prostate cancer diagnosis. A suspicious lesion can be targeted by MRI-guided biopsies and improve diagnosis. Conversely, a normal mp-MRI may non-invasively exclude the possibility of an aggressive disease, avoiding the need for further biopsies. However, there are no current guidelines for clinicians whether standard repeated biopsies (TRUS-bx) should be performed in men with either a low-suspicion mp-MRI or benign MRI-targeted biopsies of a suspicious lesion and the clinical outcome and future risk of detecting significant prostate cancer following these findings is unknown.

Therefore, we assessed the risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer after either a low-suspicion mp-MRI or benign targeted biopsies of a suspicious lesion in men with prior negative TRUS-bx, but a persistent clinical suspicion of missed significant cancer over a follow-up period of at least three years. Our results suggest that a low-suspicion MRI in men with prior negative TRUS-bx can be used non-invasively in ruling out longer term significant cancer and immediate repeated biopsies are of limited clinical value and might be avoided even if prostate-specific-antigen levels are persistently elevated.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: A low-suspicion mp-MRI in a man with prior negative TRUS-bx has a high accuracy in ruling out a significant aggressive prostate cancer during follow-up of at least three years. Thus, immediate repeated biopsies rarely find significant disease and could be avoided even if the prostate-specific-antigen level is persistently elevated.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Our results should be verified in larger prospective studies with a longer follow-up period to assess other clinical endpoints that include disease progression, cancer specific mortality and associated costs with an mp-MRI approach.

There are no disclosures or conflicts of interest

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:
J Urol. 2017 Feb 21. pii: S0022-5347(17)30297-5. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2017.02.073. [Epub ahead of print]
Clinical outcome following a low-suspicion multiparametric prostate MRI or benign MRI-guided biopsy to detect prostate cancer: A follow-up study in men with prior negative transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies.
Boesen L1, Nørgaard N2, Løgager V3, Thomsen HS4.
Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

Penile Length One Year After Radical Prostatectomy Not Statistically Different Than Pre-Op

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Yoshifumi Kadono, MD. PhD.
Department of Integrative Cancer Therapy and Urology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science,
Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: I had experienced some patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) complained penile shortening after RP. Once I checked that kind of reports, some reports mentioned the phenomenon of penile shortening (PS) after radical prostatectomy; however, the results were little bit different and the reasons of PS after RP were not well elucidated.

Therefore, we started our study to obtain our data. In our study, the penile length (PL) was measured before, 10 days after, and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months after RP. And the PL at 10 days after RP was shortest, and it gradually recovered thereafter. Penile length at 12 months after radical prostatectomy was not significantly different from preoperative penile length. Based on MRI investigation, slight vertical repositioning of the membranous urethra after radical prostatectomy caused chronological changes in penile length.

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Marked Increase in Number of US Patients With Kidney Stones

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Li Hao Richie Xu MD

Division of Mineral Metabolism
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Dallas, Texas, United States

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Over the past three decades, the prevalence of the kidney stones has escalated in the United States. Changes in dietary patterns, increasing body weight and obesity likely contributed to this significantly higher prevalence of kidney stone. In this study, we explored temporal changes in stone composition, demographic characteristics, and in serum and urinary kidney stone risk profile in kidney stone forming population for the last 35 years.

The proportion of uric acid stones has been almost doubled during this period. Although age and body mass index (BMI) increased over time in both uric acid and calcium stone formers, uric acid stone formers were consistently older, had higher BMI, and lower urinary pH than calcium stone formers. In addition, over time, the proportion of female vs. male increased in calcium stone formers, but not in uric acid stone formers. The most significant urinary parameter differentiating uric acid stone formers from calcium stone formers is 24-hour urinary pH.

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Benefits and Harms of Duloxetine For Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Emma Maund, MSc PhD
Nordic Cochrane Centre

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Duloxetine has been approved in Europe for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. It is not approved for this indication in the US and Canada. Currently, reasons why marketing authorization applications are withdrawn or denied are not published by either the Canadian or the US drug agency. However, the FDA has said that a higher-than-expected rate of suicide attempts – 2.6 timer higher – was observed in the open-label extensions of controlled trials of duloxetine for stress urinary incontinence. Given the FDA’s statement about the rate of suicide attempts, we wanted to determine whether duloxetine increased the risk of suicidality, violence or their possible precursors (drug induced akathisia, an extreme type of restlessness; activation, which consists of stimulating effects such as insomnia, anxiety and agitation; emotional disturbance, such as depersonalization and derealization; or psychotic events, such as delusions and hallucinations) in the randomized phases of the trials.

We therefore assessed the benefits and harms of duloxetine in stress urinary incontinence using clinical study reports, including individual patient data, of the 4 main trials submitted by Eli Lilly to the European Medicines Agency.
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Prostate Biopsies and Prostatectomies Drop After PSA Recommendation Changes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jim C. Hu, M.D., M.P.H. Ronald P. Lynch Professor of Urologic Oncology Director of the LeFrak Center for Robotic Surgery Weill Cornell Medicine Urology New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell New York, NY 10065

Dr. Jim Hu

Jim C. Hu, M.D., M.P.H.
Ronald P. Lynch Professor of Urologic Oncology
Director of the LeFrak Center for Robotic Surgery
Weill Cornell Medicine
Urology
New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell
New York, NY 10065

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The US Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against PSA testing in men older than 75 years in 2008 and more recently in all US men regardless of age in 2012. This was largely based on a faulty study, the prostate, lung, colo-rectal and ovarian screening study. We demonstrated in May 2016 that this randomized trial did not compare screening to no screening or apples to oranges, as it set out to do. It compared screening to screening. Although controversial, the guidelines were well-intentioned, as recognize that there is over-diagnosis and over-treatment of men with prostate cancer. Given this background, the goal of our study was to explore the downstream consequences of the recommendation against PSA screening. As such, we explored 3 separate databases to characterize national procedure volumes for prostate needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy, or surgery to cure prostate cancer.

The main finding was that prostate biopsy numbers decreased by 29% and radical prostatectomy surgeries decreased by 16% when comparing before to after USPSTF recommendations against PSA screening. Therefore practice patterns followed policy. Prostate biopsies are usually performed due to an elevated, abnormal screening PSA. However, it is also performed to monitor low-risk, slow growing prostate cancers. We also found that while the overall number of prostate biopsies decreased, there was a 29% increase in the proportion or percentage of biopsies performed due to active surveillance, or monitoring of low risk prostate cancers which should be done periodically. Therefore we provide the first national study to demonstrate that there is less over-diagnosis and over-treatment of prostate cancer.

However, the concern is that we also recently demonstrated that there is more aggressive prostate cancer on surgical pathology for men who go on to radical prostatectomy. They have high grade, higher stage cancers, which have a lower chance of cure. The link is:

http://www.prostatecancerreports.org/fulltext/2016/_Hu_JC160708.pdf

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No Link Found Between Vasectomy and Developing or Dying From Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eric Jacobs, PHD | Strategic Director, Pharmacoepidemiology American Cancer Society, Inc. 250 Williams St. Atlanta, GA 30303

Dr. Eric Jacobs

Eric Jacobs, PHD
Strategic Director, Pharmacoepidemiology
American Cancer Society, Inc.
250 Williams St.
Atlanta, GA 30303

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Vasectomy is a common, inexpensive, and very effective method of long-term birth control. However, in 2014, an analysis from a large epidemiologic cohort study, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, found that vasectomy was associated with about 10% higher overall risk of prostate cancer and about 20% higher risk of fatal prostate cancer. Together with other researchers at the American Cancer Society, I analyzed the association between vasectomy and fatal prostate cancer among more than 363,000 men in the Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II) cohort, age 40 and older, who were followed for up to 30 years. This is the largest prospective analysis of vasectomy and fatal prostate cancer to date. We also examined vasectomy and prostate cancer in a subset of about 66,000 CPS-II study participants who were followed for new diagnoses of prostate cancer.

We found no link between having had a vasectomy and risk of either developing or dying from prostate cancer.

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Is Testosterone Therapy Safe in Patients with Treated and Untreated Prostate Cancer?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Jesse Ory Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine Dalhousie University, Halifax Nova Scotia, Canada

Dr. Jesse Ory

Dr. Jesse Ory
Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine
Dalhousie University, Halifax
Nova Scotia, Canada 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The use of Testosterone Therapy (TT) in men diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer (CaP) has been highly controversial for several decades. Unfortunately, this controversy is largely founded on the results of a single patient in a study by Huggins and Hodges in the 1940s [1]. This wasn’t challenged until recently, when Morgentaler reviewed the literature on the topic and found no scientific basis for the assumption that TT will act like fuel on the fire of prostate cancer [2]. He also proposed a mechanism, the “saturation hypothesis” that helps account for why TT may in fact be safe for men with prostate cancer. [3]. Over the past decade, retrospective evidence has been accumulating that supports the safety of Testosterone Therapy in hypogonadal men with CaP on Active Surveillance, or in those who have been definitively treated for prostate cancer..

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Digital Rectal Exam and PSA May Detect Distinct Subtypes of Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jim C. Hu, MD Ronald Lynch Professor of Urologic Oncology Weill Cornell Medicine New York, NY 10065

Dr. Jim Hu

Jim C. Hu, MD
Ronald Lynch Professor of Urologic Oncology
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, NY 10065

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Initial results from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO), a large-scale randomized controlled trial of prostate cancer screening in the United States, radically changed the landscape of prostate cancer screening insofar as it led the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) to recommend against routine screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Though many subsequent studies have continued to investigate the role of PSA in screening, there is a paucity of data examining the use of digital rectal examination (DRE) for screening in the PSA era. Indeed, the USPSTF recommendation did not explicitly address DRE, calling for further research to evaluate the role of periodic DRE in prostate cancer screening. Likewise, while recent guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) recommend use of PSA in all men who elect screening, the role of digital rectal examination is equivocal.

We sought to evaluate the value of  digital rectal examination and PSA for detection of clinically significant prostate cancer and prostate cancer-specific (PCSM) and overall mortality in a secondary analysis of the PLCO.

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Quality of Life Similar For Men on Active Surveillance For Prostate Cancer vs Negative Biopsy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jennifer Cullen Meyer, PhD, MPH Director of Epidemiologic Research, Center for Prostate Disease Research Assistant Professor, Norman M. Rich Dept. of Surgery, Uniformed Services University Rockville, MD 20852

Dr. Jennifer Cullen Meyer

Jennifer Cullen Meyer, PhD, MPH
Director of Epidemiologic Research, Center for Prostate Disease Research
Assistant Professor, Norman M. Rich Dept. of Surgery, Uniformed Services University
Rockville, MD 20852

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer who are at low risk for cancer progression may choose to defer immediate treatment with curative intent and, instead, monitor their cancer. This strategy is referred to as “active surveillance.” The primary benefit of active surveillance is that it allows men to temporarily defer definitive cancer treatments that are known to cause decrements in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Studies have shown that HRQoL is better in men choosing active surveillance as compared to other treatment modalities. However, prior to our study, it was not known whether men on active surveillance experience worse HRQoL than men without prostate cancer.

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Data For Risk of Prostate Cancer with Drugs for Erectile Dysfunction Mixed

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Juzar Jamnagerwalla, MD Division of Urology, Department of Surgery Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles, California

Dr. Juzar Jamnagerwalla

Juzar Jamnagerwalla, MD
Division of Urology, Department of Surgery
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, California

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In mouse models phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors (PDE-5i) have been shown to have anti-neoplastic activity, and given the routine use of PDE-5i for treatment of erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy several studies have examined the association between PDE-5i use and biochemical recurrence after treatment for prostate cancer with mixed findings. Only one previous study has explored the association between risk of prostate cancer, finding that men on PDE-5i had a lower chance of being diagnosed with prostate cancer. Given this, we tested the relationship between PDE-5i use and risk of prostate cancer in 6,501 men in the REDUCE study finding that PDE-5i use was not associated with prostate cancer diagnosis. On secondary analysis, among North American men who had a much higher baseline use of PDE-5i use, there was an inverse association between PDE-5i use and prostate cancer diagnosis, which approached, but did not reach statistical significance.

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Prostate Cancer: Amended Gleason Score Underestimates Adverse Effect of Cribriform Pathology

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kenneth A. Iczkowski, M.D. Department of Pathology Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee, WI 53226

Dr. Kenneth Iczkowski,

Kenneth A. Iczkowski, M.D.
Department of Pathology
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI 53226

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Iczkowski: The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) in 2014 proposed use of a new 5-tier grade grouping system to supplement traditional Gleason grading to facilitate prognosis stratification and treatment1. The 5 categories subsume: Gleason 3+3=6, Gleason 3+4=7, Gleason 4+3=7, Gleason 8, and Gleason 9-10.

We desired to determine whether men with a highest Gleason score of 3+5=8 or 5+3=8 in their set of prostate biopsy specimens, would have differing outcomes from those with Gleason 4+4=8. Because Gleason 5 cancer has been demonstrated to have a higher biologic potential than Gleason 4, it was expected that Gleason score 8 pattern with any Gleason 5 pattern would have a worse outcome.

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WAVE Therapy For Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kevin T. McVary, MD, FACS Chair, Division of Urology The Pavilion at St. John’s Hospital Springfield, IL

Dr. Kevin T. McVary

Kevin T. McVary, MD, FACS
Chair, Division of Urology
The Pavilion at St. John’s Hospital
Springfield, IL
Chair and Professor of Urology
SIU School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. McVary: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is a localized enlargement of the prostate gland in aging adult men. It affects approximately 75% of men over the age of 65. This excess growth of tissue compresses and obstructs the urethra, reducing the flow of urine from the bladder and sometimes blocking it entirely. As the symptoms increase, they can greatly impact a man’s quality of life. Both BPH and the existing treatments for it can negatively affect an individual’s sex life.

The Rezūm II IDE pivotal study was a prospective, multicenter, randomized (2:1) controlled trial that enrolled 197 patients across 15 clinical sites in the U.S. The main finding showed that radiofrequency generated convective water vapor thermal therapy provides rapid and sustainable improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to BPH and urinary flow over a 12-month period without negative effects on erectile and ejaculatory function. These results support the application of convective water vapor energy (WAVE) technology as safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic alternative for symptomatic BPH. Additionally, no treatment or device related de novo erectile dysfunction occurred after thermal therapy, ejaculatory bother score improved 31% over baseline, and 27% of subjects achieved minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) in erectile function scores at 1 year, including those with moderate to severe ED.

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Heating Chemotherapy For Bladder Cancer Treatment May Increase Efficacy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alejandro Sousa, MD, PhD Department of Urology, Comarcal Hospital Monforte, Spain

Dr. Alejandro Sousa

Alejandro Sousa, MD, PhD
Department of Urology, Comarcal Hospital
Monforte, Spain

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Sousa: Bladder Cancer management has remained stable over the past 25 years, with very little in the way of new therapies or approaches being developed. Traditional treatment using intravesical Mitomycin C for Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC) patients is limited due it’s low absorption levels. Device assisted therapies that deliver Chemo-hyperthermia offer a new hope, with the potential for improved outcomes and better disease management due the the increased drug activity and better efficacy. We wanted to investigate the optimal treatment regime for this new therapy and whether it provides a safe and effective alternative to current standard treatment. Continue reading

Does Testosterone Therapy Worsen Prostate Cancer Progression?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ryan Flannigan MD FRCSC
PGY 5 Urology Resident
Department of Urological Sciences
University of British Columbia

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Flannigan: In the aging population the incidence of both prostate cancer and testosterone deficiency (TD) increase and even overlap in many patients. However, since Huggins’ original research in 1940, we have understood that prostate cancer is largely regulated by the androgen receptor (AR). Thus, the thought of treating someone with exogenous testosterone (T) was concerning for fear of further activation of the androgen receptor, and therefore promoting prostate cancer growth. However, further research has continued to add clarity to this complex interaction between androgens and the prostate. The saturation theory describes the observation that prostate specific antigen (PSA) responds to increasing serum testosterone levels only to a value of approximately 8.7nmol/L, with no inflation of PSA beyond these T levels. This is likely not the whole story when it comes to the interaction of T and the prostate, but it does suggest the prostate may not experience changes in cellular function with serum testosterone beyond low levels. It is also understood that prostate cancer requires AR activation to grow but is not caused by AR activation. Thus, we hypothesized that among those with un-treated prostate cancer, ie. patients on active surveillance, would not experience changes in biochemical recurrence (BCR) or changes in disease progression. In addition, we hypothesized that patients with previously treated prostate cancer would not have viable prostate cancer cells and thus, PSA would not increase.

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PSA Screening Clearly Prevents Some Men From Dying of Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jonathan Shoag MD Urology Resident at Cornell Department of Urology

Dr. Jonathan Shoag

Jonathan Shoag MD
Urology Resident at
Cornell Department of Urology and

Dr. Jim C. Hu MD Ronald Lynch Professor of Urologic Oncology Professor of Urology Director, Lefrak Center for Robotic Surgery Attending Urologist, New York-Presbyterian Hospital (Cornell campus)

Dr. Jim Hu

Dr. Jim C. Hu MD
Ronald Lynch Professor of Urologic Oncology
Professor of Urology
Director, Lefrak Center for Robotic Surgery
Attending Urologist, New York-Presbyterian Hospital (Cornell campus)


MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is a blood test that is used to detect prostate cancers and to follow a cancer’s response to treatment. PSA was widely implemented as a screening tool for prostate cancer in the early 1990s, and became a routine test during an annual physical for men over 40. Doctors started using it because values above a “normal” threshold were associated with a greater risk of prostate cancer. Following the adoption of PSA screening in the early 1990s, there has been a large increase in the number of men diagnosed with cancer, and a decrease of approximately 50% in the rate of prostate cancer death.

The PLCO trial was a large randomized trial designed and funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to determine the effect of PSA screening on death from prostate cancer. The trial found that men randomized/assigned to prostate cancer screening had the same number of prostate cancer deaths as men in the control group of the trial, arguing that PSA screening does not decrease prostate cancer mortality.

This was a major piece of evidence used by the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) to form its 2012 recommendation against PSA screening. The argument was that in spite of the other evidence showing a benefit to PSA testing, including US epidemiologic trends, and another large randomized trial showing PSA screening was effective (the ERSPC), we now had good evidence showing no benefit to PSA testing in the US. Since 2012 we have seen dramatic declines in prostate cancer screening in the US as a result.

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MRI Improves Detection of Prostate Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Vikas Gulani MD, PhD Director, MRI, University Hospitals Case Medical Center Associate Professor, Radiology CWRU School of Medicine Cleveland, OH

Dr. Vikas Gulani

Dr. Vikas Gulani MD, PhD
Director, MRI, University Hospitals Case Medical Center
Associate Professor, Radiology
CWRU School of Medicine
Cleveland, OH 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Gulani: For men that have a suspicion for prostate cancer either via the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test or a digital rectal exam, the current standard of care is to perform a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy to detect cancer. The problem with TRUS biopsy is that most tumors are not visible on ultrasound and hence many significant cancers are missed. At the same time this strategy detects a high number of low risk, indolent cancers, and leads to overtreatment of disease that would be better left untreated.

Diagnostic MRI and MRI-guided biopsy (cognitive, ultrasound-MR fusion, or in-gantry) have been shown to be effective in detecting clinically significant prostate cancer. However, despite these advantages there is reluctance to incorporate MRI into standard practice because it is perceived to be expensive. Our goal was to determine if this presumption is true, and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the MRI-guided techniques most commonly used.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Dr. Gulani: We found that every MRI strategy we evaluated was cost-effective compared to standard biopsy. Cognitive MRI guided biopsy – where the operator performs an ultrasound biopsy based on knowledge of lesion location from the MRI – was the most cost-effective strategy compared to standard biopsy. In-gantry MRI yielded the highest net health benefits as measured in quality adjusted life years.

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Nasal Spray Desmopressin – Noctiva- Reduces Nighttime Voiding in Patients With Nocturia

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Jed Kaminetsky - MD Clinical Assistant Professor Department of Urology NYU Langone Medical Center

Dr. Jed Kaminetsky

Dr. Jed Kaminetsky MD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Urology
NYU Langone Medical Center 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Kaminetsky: Nocturia is a voiding disorder not well treated by available drugs for overactive bladder and benign prostatic hypertrophy. Desmopressin stimulates the kidneys to concentrate the urine which results in a greatly reduced volume of urine formation for a period of time. Serenity Pharmaceuticals has spent many years developing a low dose nasal spray version of desmopressin called Noctiva specifically for nocturia. The study reported now is a large, placebo controlled phase 3 trial to confirm the statistical efficacy and clinical benefit of this treatment for nocturia.

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Four Management Options For Small Kidney Masses

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Hiten D. Patel, MD, MPH Resident, Urological Surgery James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions Baltimore, Maryland 21287

Dr. Hiten Patel

Hiten D. Patel, MD, MPH
Resident, Urological Surgery
James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute
The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Baltimore, Maryland 21287 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Patel: The study reports results of a systematic review contracted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality based on input from stakeholders. Part of the motivation was due to the American Urological Association’s desire to use the results as a basis to update relevant clinical guidelines.

There are four major management options for clinically localized small renal masses diagnosed on imaging including active surveillance, thermal ablation, partial nephrectomy, and radical nephrectomy. The body of research evaluating these management options is broad, but many of the studies performing comparative analyses have limitations. Therefore, the systematic review aimed to evaluate a number of outcomes (e.g. overall survival, cancer specific survival, local recurrence, metastasis, renal function, complications, and perioperative outcomes) based on available comparative studies in the literature.

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Survey Finds Majority of Men Fearful of Urinary Catheters

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Errol Singh

Dr. Errol Singh

Errol Singh, M.D.
Urologist and CEO of PercuVision

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Singh: We set out to better understand the American public’s fears around Foley catheters and hopefully bring attention to the fact that hospitalizations due to infections from urinary catheters are on the rise. Interestingly enough, 20 percent of hospital patients undergo a urinary catheterization, which is the second most common procedure following intravenous therapy. The procedure, however, often leads to complications including infections mostly caused by trauma.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Dr. Singh: The main findings of the 2016 Urinary Catheter Fear Survey revealed that three out of five men (58 percent) are fearful of urinary catheterizations, while one out of every four men is very fearful of the procedure. Younger men also seem to be more fearful than their older counterparts. More than two-thirds (68 percent) of men ages 18-34 surveyed are fearful of urinary catheterizations, compared to 43 percent of males 65 and over.
Clearly, females are less fearful, with 46 percent of women saying they are not fearful of urinary catheterizations, compared to 37 percent of men. It’s also important to note that half of all women surveyed say they fear the procedure, and 25 percent reporting they are very fearful. You can find more of the 2016 Urinary Catheter Fear Survey results on our website atwww.percuvision.com.

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New Nephroureteral ConvertX System Unblocks and Stents in One Procedure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. H. Bob Smouse MD Interventional Radiology, Radiology OSF Saint Francis Medical Center Peoria, IL

Dr. H. Bob Smouse

Dr. H. Bob Smouse MD
Interventional Radiology, Radiology
OSF Saint Francis Medical Center
Peoria, IL

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Smouse: For more than twenty years I’ve seen my patients with severe blockages of the ureter undergo two separate invasive procedures to implant one ureteral stent. Even though these procedures are done with interventional techniques, they require sedation, radiation, time off work, and occasionally have some level of pain and discomfort. Being able to potentially eliminate an entire invasive procedure for these patients has been a goal of mine for years.

ConvertX device

ConvertX Stent

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Dr. Smouse: All devices tested showed 100% success in implantation and 100% success in converting from an internal-external nephroureteral catheter into an internal nephroureteral stent without the need for a second invasive procedure.

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Stem Cells May Improve Blood Flow In Patients With Erectile Dysfunction

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Michael Zahalsky MD Medical Director of Urological Oncology North Broward Medical Center, Florida

Dr. Michael Zahalsky

Dr. Michael Zahalsky MD
Medical Director of Urological Oncology
North Broward Medical Center, Florida

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Zahalsky: Erectile dysfunction or the inability to maintain an erection satisfactory for sexual intercourse is a disease that affects hundreds of millions of men worldwide. Currently, the most utilized methods to help treat these men include oral medications, injectable medications and penile prostheses.

We sought out new alternatives to treat and potentially even cure erectile dysfunction by using stem cells and biologic-based therapies – treatments that are now being used in various fields of medicine from orthopedics to plastic surgery. We decided to see how their effect will influence Erectile Dysfunction by evaluating blood flow to the penis. In the past we studied Peyronie’s Disease using a similar treatment modality and showed that with a single injection blood flow improved, plaque size decreased, and penile curvature lessened.  There have been many animal studies, as well, showing the benefit of biologic-based therapies in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction and Peyronie’s Disease.

We chose to use placental matrix derived mesenchymal stem cells in this study on Erectile Dysfunction. We had a small sample of 8 patients who underwent treatment. We had statistically significant increase in blood flow into the penis.  This was demonstrated by an increase in peak systolic velocity using color doppler on ultrasound.

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Prostate Cancer Radiation Raises Risk of Colon and Bladder Cancers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Robert Nam, MD, FRCSC Ajmera Family Chair in Urologic Oncology Professor of Surgery University of Toronto Head, Genitourinary Cancer Site Odette Cancer Centre Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Toronto, Ontario

Dr. Robert Nam

Robert Nam, MD, FRCSC
Ajmera Family Chair in Urologic Oncology
Professor of Surgery
University of Toronto
Head, Genitourinary Cancer Site
Odette Cancer Centre
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Toronto, Ontario

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Prostate cancer treatment is associated with a number of complications including erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. Two years ago, we published a paper examining other, previously undescribed complications. The most controversial finding was a significantly increased risk of secondary cancers among men treated with radiotherapy. We therefore wanted to assess this in a meta-analysis, examining all the research currently available on the topic.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: We found that, for patients with prostate cancer, radiotherapy treatment was associated with significantly increased rates of bladder cancer, colorectal cancer and rectal cancer. There wasn’t an increased risk for other cancers such as lung and blood system cancer. However, the absolute rates of these cancers remained low (1-4% of patients).

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Decipher Genomic Testing Moves Prostate Cancer Prognosis into Precision Medicine Era

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eric A. Klein, MD Chairman, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute Cleveland Clinic

Dr. Eric Klein

Eric A. Klein, MD
Chairman, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute
Cleveland Clinic

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Klein: Prostate cancer is an enigma. While this tumor is the second leading cause of cancer death among American men, most newly diagnosed disease detected by PSA screening is biologically indolent and does not require immediate therapy. Currently, the main clinical challenge in these men is to distinguish between those who can be managed by active surveillance from those who require curative intervention. Current clinical and pathological tools used for risk stratification are limited in accuracy for distinguishing between these scenarios.

An abundance of research in the last decade has provided evidence that genomics can offer meaningful and clinically actionable biological information to help inform decision making, and current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines on prostate cancer endorse the use of commercially available genomic tools for men considering active surveillance.[1] It has been previously shown that the 22-gene genomic classifier, Decipher, accurately predicts the likelihood of metastasis and prostate cancer specific mortality when measured on tissue from radical prostatectomy specimens.[2] In multiple validation studies, it performed with higher accuracy and discrimination compared to clinical risk factors alone.

The current study[3] is the first to examine whether the use of Decipher might aid decision making when measured on biopsy tissue at the time of diagnosis. Men with available needle biopsy samples were identified from a study cohort that previously had Decipher performed on their matched radical prostatectomy tissue. In this cohort of mixed low, intermediate and high risk men, Biopsy Decipher predicted the risk of metastasis 10 years post RP with high accuracy, outperforming NCCN clinical risk categorization, biopsy Gleason score and pre-operative PSA. Furthermore, this study showed that Decipher reclassified 46% of patients into lower or higher risk classification compared to NCCN classification alone. The study also showed that Biopsy Decipher can identify men that are at high risk for adverse pathology as defined by the presence of primary Gleason pattern 4 or greater.

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Individualized Surgery Helps Preserve Erectile Function in High Risk Prostate Cancer Patients

Medicalresearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Pedro Recabal, MD and
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Department of Surgery,
Urology Service New York, NY
Urology service, Fundacion Arturo Lopez Perez, Santiago, Chile
Dr. Vincent P. Laudone,
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Department of Surgery
Urology Service New York, NY

Medicalresearch.com What is the background for this study?

Response:  One of the most concerning adverse events that may arise following surgery for prostate cancer (radical prostatectomy) is postoperative erectile dysfunction. The loss of erectile function after surgery is most frequently caused by intraoperative injury to the neurovascular bundles, tiny packages of blood vessels and nerves that conduct the impulses responsible for erection. It is known that if both bundles are removed, patients seldom recover erectile function. Accordingly, neurovascular bundle preservation during Radical prostatectomy has proven benefits in terms of erectile function recovery.

However, as these bundles are intimately associated with the posterolateral aspects of the prostate, they must be carefully separated from the surface of the prostate without cutting them, applying excessive traction, or using cautery, all of which could produce irreversible damage and the consequent loss of function. During this dissection, the surgeon risks cutting into the prostatic capsule , which could result in leaving tumor behind. In some cases, the tumor extends beyond the prostate into the neurovascular bundles, and an attempt to preserve these structures could also result in incomplete tumor removal, defeating the purpose of radical prostatectomy.

Therefore, many urologists treating patients with “aggressive” tumors (such as the patients in our cohort) would try to avoid leaving cancer behind by removing not only the prostate but also the tissue around it, including the neurovascular bundles. In other words, if you had to chose between removing all the cancer but loosing erectile function, or preserving erectile function but risking an incomplete cancer removal, most patients and surgeons naturally lean towards the first option. Also, in many centers, patients with aggressive prostate cancers are managed with combined treatments (multimodal therapy), by adding hormonal therapy and/or radiotherapy, which could also result in erectile dysfunction. As such, many surgeons believe that there is no rationale for attempting to preserve the neurovascular bundles in these “high-risk” patients because most will end up with erectile dysfunction .

However, with the advent of MRI (and integrating other clinical information such as location of the positive biopsies, and intraoperative cues), surgeons can now have a better idea of where the cancer is located, which may aid in surgical planning. For instance, if a tumor is located in the anterior prostate, removing the neurovascular bundles (located on the posterolateral aspects) would provide no oncologic benefit, regardless of the aggressiveness of the tumor. Similarly, if the tumor compromises only the left side, removing the right neurovascular bundle is unlikely to help the patient, but can instead result in harm.

Moreover, neurovascular bundle preservation is not an all-or-none procedure; on each side, these bundles can be completely preserved (meaning dissecting exactly along the border between the prostate and the bundle); partially preserved (meaning preserving some of the nerves that are further away from the prostate, and removing the ones that are closer to the prostate); or completely removed along with the prostate (This has been graded in a scale from 1 to 4, where 1 represents complete preservation, and 4 represents complete removal of the neurovascular bundle, with 2 and 3 being partial preservation. This grade is recorded by the surgeon for each side, at the end of the procedure.) As such, sometimes it’s possible to preserve part of the bundle, even if there is a tumor on the same side

We designed a retrospective study to look at how high volume surgeons at MSKCC performed radical prostatectomy in high risk patients (how frequently and to what extent where the neurovascular bundles preserved), and what were the outcomes in terms of positive surgical margins (a surrogate for “leaving tumor behind”); use of additional oncologic treatments such as hormone therapy or radiotherapy, and finally, erectile function recovery in patients with functional erections before the operation. The patients in our cohort had at least one NCCN-defined high risk criteria (Gleason score ≥ 8; PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml; Clinical stage ≥ T3).

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More Long Term Stress Incontinence With Vaginal Delivery vs C-Section

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kari Aarne Olavi Tikkinen, M.D PHD Urology resident and clinical epidemiologist Department of Urology Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki Helsinki, Finland

Dr. Kari Tikkinen

Kari Aarne Olavi Tikkinen, M.D PHD
Adjunct Professor
Department of Urology
Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki
Helsinki, Finland

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Tikkinen: ​Stress and urgency incontinence are the two most frequent and the most bothersome urinary symptoms among women. It has been estimated that about twelve percent of women report significant bother from stress incontinence and eight percent from urgency incontinence. Both stress urinary incontinence and urgency urinary incontinence are associated with substantial physical and psychological morbidity, and large societal costs.

An extensive body of evidence suggests that delivering vaginally versus caesarean section increases rates of post-partum stress urinary incontinence. The magnitude of long term effects of different delivery modes on stress and urgency urinary incontinence remain, however, uncertain. ​

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Study Identifies PSA Level Most Likely To Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence

R. Jeffrey Karnes MD Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905

Dr. R. Jeffrey Karnes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
R. Jeffrey Karnes MD

Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic,
Rochester, MN 55905  

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Karnes: Cancer recurrence following radical prostatectomy is a concern for men undergoing definitive surgical treatment for prostate cancer. Approximately 20-35% of patients develop a rising prostate specific antigen following radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. PSA monitoring is an important tool for cancer surveillance; however, a standard PSA cutpoint to indicate biochemical recurrence has yet to be established. Over 60 different definitions have been described in literature. This variation creates confusion for the patients and clinicians. By studying a large group of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy at Mayo Clinic, we found that a PSA cutpoint of 0.4 ng/mL is the optimal definition for biochemical recurrence.
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Can Active Surveillance Be Extended To Some Men With Elevated PSAs?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Isaac Yi Kim, MD, PhD
Acting Chief and Associate Professor, Division of Urology
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Chief, Section of Urologic Oncology and
Young Suk “Joseph” Kwon, MD
Post-doctoral fellow  Section of Urologic Oncology
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
New Brunswick, NJ 08903

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Response: Although PSA < 10 ng/mL is a typically required condition under which many active surveillance (AS) protocols operate, this current guideline may predispose lower risk patients with incongruently elevated PSA to aggressive and potentially unnecessary therapies. Specifically, urologists infrequently encounter patients with PSA > 10 ng/ml but biopsy demonstrating a relatively lower risk prostate cancer (PCa).

Therefore, we wanted to test whether active surveillance may be a viable option in some men with a histologically favorable risk prostate cancer and serum PSA between 10 and 20 ng/ml.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Response: We compared oncologic outcomes in men with favorable biopsy histology and varying PSA levels: low, intermediate, and high PSA levels.

The rates of upstaging and upgrading were similar between the intermediate PSA (IP) (≥10 and 20) and low PSA (LP) (<10) group. In contrast, the high PSA  (HP) (≥20) group had higher incidences of both upstaging (p=0.02) and upgrading to ≥4+3 (p=0.046) compared to the IP group. BCR-free survival rates revealed no pair-wise inter-group differences, except between low PSA and high PSA .

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Standardized Model Empowers Nurses To Decrease Urinary Catheter Use

Jerome A. Leis, MD MSc FRCPC Staff physician, General Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases Physician Lead, Antimicrobial Stewardship Team Staff member, Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto

Dr. Jerome Leis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Jerome A. Leis, MD MSc FRCPC

Staff physician, General Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Physician Lead, Antimicrobial Stewardship Team
Staff member, Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Leis: Overuse of urinary catheters leads to significant morbidity among hospitalized patients.  In most hospitals, discontinuation of urinary catheters relies on individual providers remembering to re-assess whether patients have an ongoing reason for a urinary catheter.  We engaged all of the attending physicians to agree on the appropriate reasons for leaving a urinary catheter in place and developed a medical directive for nurses to remove all urinary catheters lacking these indications.  This nurse-led intervention resulted in a significant reduction in urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infections, compared with wards that continued to rely on usual practice.

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Men Have Small Risk of Falls and Fractures When Starting Prostate Alpha Blockers

Blayne Welk MD Assistant Professor in the Division of Urology The University of Western Ontario

Dr. Welk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Blayne Welk MD
Assistant Professor in the Division of Urology
Department of Surgery, Western University Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Western University, London, Ontario 

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Welk: Alpha blocker medications are used to treat urinary symptoms in men. They are very commonly prescribed, especially among the elderly. One of the potential side effects of these medications is low blood pressure and fainting. Newer medications are designed to be more specific to the prostate, in order to try and reduce these risks. Previous studies have had conflicting results regard the risk of low blood pressure, and whether this risk translates into clinically relevant complications like serious falls, fractures or head injury.

This study demonstrated that there is a small, but significant increase in the risk of falls, fractures and head injury associated with the initiation of prostate specific alpha blockers. Most men, however have a very low risk of these events to begin with, so the absolute change in their risk is very small. The mechanism of these outcomes is likely mediated through hypotension, which was also diagnosed in the majority of men with a fall or fracture.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Welk: Men starting alpha blocker medication for urinary symptoms should be counselled about the potential risk of low blood pressure and fainting. While not dangerous most of the time, these medications can lead to fractures and head injuries, which have serious consequences in the elderly. Avoiding dangerous activities when first starting these medications, and taking the mediation at night time may help avoid these risks.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Welk: Further research could examine the the role of 5 alpha reductase inhibitors (also used for male urinary symptoms) in modulating the risk of falls and fractures in men being treated with alpha blockers.

Citation:

Welk Blayne, McArthur Eric, Fraser Lisa-Ann,Hayward Jade, Dixon Stephanie, Hwang Y Joseph et al. The risk of fall and fracture with the initiation of a prostate-selective α antagonist: a population based cohort study 2015; 351 :h5398

Blayne Welk MD (2015). Men Have Small Risk of Falls and Fractures When Starting Prostate Alpha Blockers

Transvaginal Mesh Complications Lower In High Volume Surgical Practices

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Blayne Welk MD Assistant Professor in the Division of Urology The University of Western OntarioBlayne Welk MD
Assistant Professor in the Division of Urology
The University of Western Ontario

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Welk: Stress incontinence is a common problem among women. The most frequently used surgical treatment is a mesh-based midurethral sling. This procedure is commonly called a transvaginal sling, and is usually an outpatient procedure that takes about an hour in the operating room. However, there has been significant concern about some of the complications of this procedure, which include chronic pain, and mesh erosions into the urinary tract. This prompted the FDA and Health Canada to issue warnings regarding the use of transvaginal mesh, and numerous lawsuits have been launched against manufactures of transvaginal mesh products.

This study by Dr Welk and colleagues identifies the long term rate of surgical treated complications among a group of almost 60,000 women who had mesh based incontinence procedures between 2002-2012. The rate of surgically treated complications at 1 year is 1.2%, however this increased to 3.3% after 10 years of followup. The FDA and Health Canada recommend that surgeons obtain training and experience in their chosen type of midurethral sling, and we demonstrated that patients of high volume surgeons (who frequently performed mesh based incontinence procedures) were 27% less likely to have one of these complications.

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Some Prostate Cancer Patient Decision Aids Need Updating

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prajakta Adsul, MBBS, MPH, PhD; Ricardo Wray, PhD, and Sameer Siddiqui, MD
Center for Cancer Prevention, Research and Outreach
Saint Louis University

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Patient decision aids are interventions designed to help patients engage in shared decision making with their providers when multiple choices with more or less equivalent efficacy are available for a particular medical decision. Several patient decision aids exists for numerous medical conditions and previous research has demonstrated them to be effective in improving the patient’s knowledge and understanding of treatment options and their relative efficacy and side-effects and resulting in a higher proportion of decision that are consistent with patient’s values and personal preferences.

In the context of prostate cancer treatment, the practice of shared decision making is vital as highlighted by recent calls from the American Urological Association and the American Cancer Society. To aid with this process, several patient decision aids exist. However, the content presented, the format and presentation styles of decision aids can be variable and can have an influence on the choice made by the patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics of the patient decision aids designed for men facing prostate cancer treatment. We used the widely accepted International Patient Decision Aids Standards (IPDAS) for the assessment, supplemented with implementation criteria to strategize successful future improvement and promotion of decision aids in routine urological practice.

The main findings of the review were that none of the decision aids reviewed met all standards. The aids had variable content, format and presentation of prostate cancer treatment information. Several decision aids were outdated and critical issues such as the risk of overtreatment and active surveillance as a treatment option for prostate cancer were not always covered in decision aids.

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Use of Mesh Surgery For Prolapse Continues To Rise

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Bilal Chughtai, MD & Art Sedrakyan, MD, PhD
Department of Urology
Weill Cornell Medical College

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Since 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released number of public health notifications cautioning the use of mesh in pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery. Despite these notifications and subsequent public scrutiny, studies have reported a large increase of mesh use in female patients with pelvic organ prolapse during the last decade. In light of the reported rise in mesh utilization, we sought to determine the use of mesh in prolapse surgery and compare short-term outcomes of prolapse surgery with or without mesh.

After identifying 7,338 and 20,653 patients who underwent prolapse repair procedures with and without mesh in a 4-year period, we found that mesh use increased 44.7%. Most patients were under 65 (62.3%), and there were more patients older than 65 years in the mesh group (44.3% versus 35.4%). Overall, complications were not common. However, patients who received mesh were more likely to experience urinary retention within 90-days and had a higher chance of having re-intervention at 1 year. Mesh use was also associated with higher risk of urinary retention in older patients (≥ 65 year olds) and re-intervention within 1 year in younger patients (<65 year olds).

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Analysis Of Large Medical Datasets Can Be Both Informative and Misleading

David F. Penson, MD, MPHHamilton and Howd Chair in Urologic Oncology Professor and Chair, Department of Urologic Surgery Director, Center for Surgical Quality and Outcomes Research Vanderbilt University Medical Center Nashville, TN 37232-2765MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
David F. Penson, MD, MPH
Hamilton and Howd Chair in Urologic Oncology
Professor and Chair, Department of Urologic Surgery
Director, Center for Surgical Quality and Outcomes Research
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, TN 37232-2765

Medical Research: What is the background for this editorial? What are the main findings?

Response: This editorial discusses the implication of the recent removal of the PSA data from the seer-medicare dataset. It reviews the significance of the action: specifically what it means for prior publications that used this information to address clinical research questions in prostate cancer. It makes the point that, while these datasets are powerful, researchers have stretched the limits of what they can do too far. Simply put, we cant always guarantee that the clinical data collected in administrative datasets will necessarily be accurate so we need to be more selective in how we use these data and not simply run analyses on the data just because it is easy.

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Grandfather’s Age At Paternity May Affect Man’s Fertility

Medicalresearch.com Interview with:
Ross Anderson M.D.,M.C.R.
Allina Health clinics and
Jim Hotaling M.D.,M.S.,F.E.C.S.M.
Utah Center for Reproductive Medicine
Salt Lake City, UT 84108

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Anderson: There is a growing trend of delayed marriage and childbearing, particularly into the third and fourth decade of life. Advanced maternal age is well recognized as a risk factor for chromosomal abnormalities and perinatal complications, but there is also growing interest in the impact of advanced paternal age.

Multiple studies have demonstrated that as men age their sperm quality and ability to have children decreases. We were interested in how the age of the parents and the age of the grandparents at the time of conception can affect a man’s sperm quality. We hypothesized that men with older parents and grandparents at the time of conception would have a linear decrease in the quality of their sperm.

We used Utah’s two largest andrology lab’s semen analyses and these men were linked to the Utah Population Database. The Utah Population Database allows us access to birth certificate data and pedigree data going back to the late 1800s. With this we can determine the age of the parents and grandparents at the time they had each subsequent generation.

We found that the age of the parents did not influence a man’s semen concentration, motility, or total sperm count. Interestingly, the age of the paternal grandfather was associated with an increased risk of poor semen concentration. For instance, if a grandfather was older than 45 year of age at the time of conception of the father, there is a 39% chance a man’s semen concentration would be considered low according to the World Health Organization (less than 15 million per milliliter). Continue reading

Testosterone Therapy Lowered Mortality In Hypogonadal Men

Ranjith Ramasamy MD Assistant Professor of Urology University of MiamiMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ranjith Ramasamy MD
Assistant Professor of Urology
University of Miami

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Ramasamy: The association between testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) and thrombotic risk in elderly men remains controversial. We evaluated the prevalence of thrombotic events and all-cause mortality in men older than 65 years with hypogonadism treated with testosterone therapy. We compared men treated with testosterone to an age and comorbidity matched cohort of hypogonadal men not treated with testosterone supplementation therapy.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Ramasamy: No man who received testosterone supplementation therapy died, whereas 6 hypogonadal men who did not receive TST died (p=0.007). There were 4 thrombotic events (1 MI – myocardial infarction, 2 CVA/TIA – stroke, 1 PE – pulmonary embolism) in men who received testosterone supplementation therapy compared to 1 event (CVA/TIA) among men who did not receive TST (p = 0.8). All the events (except one death which took place at 6 months of follow–up) occurred 2 years or more after follow–up. Strengths of the study include long follow–up (>3 years), availability of serum testosterone levels before and after therapy and of a control group (hypogonadal men not treated with TST) for comparison. Limitations included retrospective study design, and a small sample size.
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Poor Sleep May Contribute To Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Alexander W. Pastuszak, MD, PhD
Male Reproductive Medicine and Surgery
Scott Department of Urology
Jason Malcolm Scovell
Medical Student, Ofc SA-BCM Students
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Sleep quality is an important component of overall health, and can both exacerbate health issues and be impaired by health problems. Shift workers, primarily those who do not work standard daylight shifts, are prone to sleep problems, a significant concern in light of the fact that up to 25% of the U.S. workforce is comprised of shift workers. As men age, the prevalence of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS), which include urgency, frequency, waking up at night to urinate, and difficulties with urination, increases.  Unsurprisingly, men with LUTS report poor sleep in part due to awakening repeatedly during the night. We studied a group of male shift workers, who we believe to be an ‘at-risk’ population, and found that not only do the men who report worse sleep quality have worse Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, but also men who report difficulty falling asleep have more severe LUTS than those who do not. This latter point is significant, given that most men with LUTS can fall asleep without difficulty, but then awaken repeatedly throughout the night, and suggests that sleep difficulties in this population may be resulting in Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms rather than LUTS exclusively resulting in sleep difficulties.

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Bladder Urine Is Not Sterile

Alan J. Wolfe PhD, Professor Department of Microbiology and Immunology Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Maywood, ILMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Alan J. Wolfe PhD, Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago
Maywood, IL

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Wolfe: Several years ago, Dr. Brubaker and I began a conversation. As a urogynecologist, she was concerned about the general lack of improvement in diagnosis and treatment in her urogynecological practice and thus in clinical outcome. As a microbiologist, I was extremely skeptical of the dogma that urine in the bladder was sterile in the absence of a clinical infection. This skepticism was based upon my former work in bacterial motility and biofilm formation and on the knowledge that most bacteria are not cultured by the standard clinical microbiology urine culture method. With the goal of ultimately improving urogynecological practice, and with the help of our colleagues in the Loyola Urinary Education and Research Collaborative (LUEREC), we decided to test the sterile bladder hypothesis by seeking evidence of bacteria in urine taken directly from the bladder to avoid vulva-vaginal contamination. To detect bacterial DNA, we used high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. To detect live bacteria, we developed an Expanded Quantitative Urine Culture (EQUC) protocol. We applied these complementary approaches to women with and without urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) whose standard clinical urine culture was negative.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Wolfe: First and foremost, the bladder is not sterile. We can detect bacteria and/or bacterial DNA in most women whether they have urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) or not. Thus, the female bladder contains a resident bacterial community, which we call the female urinary microbiome (FUM). We found that bacterial members of the FUM are distinct from the bacteria that typically cause urinary tract infections (UTI). Thus, the bacteria that make up the FUM are not the bacteria that cause typical UTIs. Indeed, detection of the female urinary microbiome was associated with reduced risk of UTIs that often occur after instrumentation or surgery. We therefore hypothesize that the FUM or some members of the FUM could protect against UTI. We also saw that the FUM in women with UUI differs from the FUM in women without UUI and that certain bacterial species were considerably more common in women with urgency urinary incontinence than in women without urgency urinary incontinence . We hypothesize that some of these bacteria could be causative or contributory to UUI or they could be a consequence of urgency urinary incontinence.

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