Author Interviews, Brain Injury, Cannabis / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Pamela Maher, PhD Research Professor Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory SALK Institute for Biologic Studies La Jolla California   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Several years ago, we tested several different cannabinoids for protection against the oxytosis/ferroptosis regulated cell death pathway and found CBN (cannabinol) to be one of the most effective. While THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidol) were also quite protective, we wanted to pursue non-psychoactive cannabinoids. Since we are interested in maintaining brain function in the context of aging and disease, we thought that a psychoactive compound could be problematic. In addition, there was already a lot of work on CBD, so we thought we could learn more and contribute more to the field by studying CBN. (more…)
Author Interviews, Sexual Health, Urology / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: dr-michelle-pearlman-mdDr. Amy Pearlman MD GenitoUrinary Surgeon and Sexual Medicine Specialist Board-Certified in Urology MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: There is significant controversy within urology (and in mainstream conversation) regarding penile enhancement. Our clinical experience with the PhalloFill protocol over the last 4 years has yielded great clinical and safety results. The purpose of our research is to study our outcomes in a more scientific fashion and, as a result, to be able to use this information to help educate potential patients, current patients, interested folks in the community, and other healthcare providers. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, JAMA, Nutrition / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marta Guasch-Ferré, PhD Associate Professor and Deputy Head of Section, Section of Epidemiology University of Copenhagen Group Leader, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response:  Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fats and contains compounds with antioxidant activity that may play a protective role for the brain. Olive oil as part of a Mediterranean diet appears to have a beneficial effect against cognitive decline. Higher olive oil intake was previously associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. But its association with dementia mortality was unknown. (more…)
Author Interviews, Environmental Risks / 07.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gediminas "Gedi" Mainelis, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What types of particles, ie where do they come from? Response: This work is a continuation of my research on nanoparticles in consumer products. We have investigated and published on the release of particles from nano-enabled consumer products, such as cosmetic powders, various sprays and clothing. In this project, we were interested in potential resuspension of particles once nano-enabled consumer sprays are used. The particles are added into consumer products to provide them certain desired properties, like antimicrobial protection, odor reduction or protection against UV (sunscreen). Once the products are used, the particles are released and we could be exposed to them. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews / 02.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Li Gan PhD Burton P. and Judith B. Resnick Distinguished Professor in Neurodegenerative Diseases Brain and Mind Research Institute Weill Cornell Medical College Shiaoching Gong PhD Helen and Robert Appel Alzheimer’s Disease Institute Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Would you describe the process of making these neurons? Response: Primary tauopathies are a group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the pathological aggregation of 3R or 4R tau protein in neurons and/or glial cells, where 4R tauopathies are more common primary tauopathies. The exact pathological mechanisms remain elusive. There are currently no therapies available that can halt or reverse the spread of tau aggregates since the drug effects found in animal models are not always reproduced in human clinical trials. The development of tau therapies from human cells have become urgently needed. Induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer a unique model to better understand pathological mechanisms underlying human diseases and to develop human cell-based therapy. However, a major challenge to study 4R tauopathy is iPSC-derived neurons express very low levels of 4R Tau isoforms making it difficult to study 4R tauopathy and the mutations located in 4R Tau. To address this need, we designed and engineered a robust human iPSC 4R tauopathy model using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We first introduced specific mutations at the intron-exon 10 junctions and silent mutations within exon 10 to promote exon 10 inclusion, leading the increase of 4R isoforms expression in iPSC-derived neurons. Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) mutation, P301S located in exon 10 is highly aggregation prone. To generate this human disease 4R tauopathy model, we then introduced this mutation to 4R iPSC to make it a 4RP301S iPSC line. (more…)
Author Interviews, Breast Cancer, JAMA, USPSTF / 01.05.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Wanda K. Nicholson, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A. Senior Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Professor of Prevention and Community Health Milken Institute School of Public Health George Washington University Dr. Nicholson was appointed chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in March 2024. She served as vice chair from March 2022 to March 2024 and as a member of the Task Force from January 2009 through December 2013. MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths for women in the U.S. After reviewing the latest science, the Task Force recommends screening all women for breast cancer every other year starting at age 40 and continuing through age 74. This new approach has the potential to save nearly 20 percent more lives from breast cancer and has even greater potential benefit for Black women, who are much more likely to die from breast cancer. (more…)
Author Interviews, Health Care Systems / 27.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gaurav Khanna Ph.D. Assistant Professor | School of Global Policy and Strategy University of California, San Diego www.econgaurav.com   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: There is a shortage of doctors in certain parts of the US. For instance, although about 20% of the United States population live in rural areas, only 11% of physicians practice in these locations. The research shows that relaxed visa requirements enable more foreign-trained doctors to practice in remote and low-income areas, without reducing the employment of U.S.-trained doctors. One such program that facilitates keeping foreign-born physicians in the US is the Conrad 30 Program. Most participants in the Conrad 30 Waiver Program work in Health Professional Shortage Areas (or HPSAs), areas lacking an adequate number of primary care physicians, dentists, or mental health care providers. (more…)
Author Interviews, CDC, Infections, JAMA / 27.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Shruti K. Gohil, MD Assistant Professor, Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine Associate Medical Director, Epidemiology & Infection Prevention, Infectious Diseases UCI School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?
  • Antibiotic resistance, which occurs when germs like bacteria and fungi mutate to defeat the drugs designed to kill them, is a major public health threat.
  • Data show that 40-50% of patients hospitalized with pneumonia receive broad spectrum antibiotics when they do not need them.
  • Helping clinicians tailor antibiotic prescriptions to individual patients can improve patient outcomes by preserving healthy bacteria in the body and reducing the risk of future antibiotic resistance.
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Annals Internal Medicine, Author Interviews, Gender Differences, UCLA / 25.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Yusuke Tsugawa, MD, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine & Health Policy and Management, UCLA Director of Data Core, UCLA Department of Medicine Statistics Core Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Los Angeles, CA 90024   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Prior studies have found that female and male physicians practice medicine differently. For example, female physicians are, on average, more likely to abide by clinical guidelines and spend more time listening to patients. However, evidence was limited as to whether such differences have clinically meaningful impact on patients’ health outcomes, which was the aim of this study. (more…)
Author Interviews, COVID -19 Coronavirus, JAMA, Technology, UCSD, Vaccine Studies / 25.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: John W. AyersJohn W. Ayers, PhD MA Vice Chief of Innovation | Assoc. Professor
Div. Infectious Disease & Global Public Health University of California San Diego Since the World Health Organization declared an ‘infodemic’ of misinformation, there have been surprisingly few achievements to celebrate. X's Community Notes have emerged as an innovative strategy to address misinformation as reported in the latest issue of JAMA.
Before the inception of Community Notes, social media companies employed various tactics to tackle misinformation, including censoring, shadowbanning (muting a user or their content on a platform without informing them), and adding generic warning labels to problematic content. However, these efforts were typically undisclosed meaning their effectiveness could not be studied.

In late 2022, X introduced Community Notes. This novel approach empowers volunteer, independent, anonymous, and ideologically diverse contributors to identify posts containing misinformation and to rectify misinformation by appending informative "notes" to suspect posts. The process is controlled by the public, instead of decision-makers at the company. Most importantly the system is open-sourced so it can be studied by external scientists.

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Author Interviews, Brigham & Women's - Harvard, Mental Health Research, NIH / 19.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sharon Dekel PhD Principal Investigator Director of the Postpartum Traumatic Stress Disorders Research Program Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, 02114 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Maternal psychopathologies affect a significant number of American women and are the leading complications of childbirth and a significant contributor to maternal death. Maternal (physical) morbidity in the US remain the highest among all countries in the West, suggesting that some women will have a traumatic childbirth experience. The most common mental illness associated with trauma is posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD stemming from childbirth is estimated to affect 6% of delivering women (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28443054/). In high-risk groups, for example women who have unscheduled Cesareans the rate is estimated at 20% or higher (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31041603/.). Although we screen for postpartum depression in hospitals in the USA there is no screening for what we define as childbirth-related PTSD (CB-PTSD). The overarching goal of the Dekel Lab is to develop novel and patient-friendly screening tools to identify women with this disorder. As importantly traumatic childbirth disproportionality affects Black and Latina women (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35598158/). (more…)
Author Interviews, Cannabis / 18.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Amy Kennalley, MBS First Year Medical Student Department of Medical Education Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study Response: The legalization of medical marijuana (MMJ) and the number of qualifying conditions are expanding across the USA, emphasizing the need to understand the implications of MMJ dispensary distribution for equitable access. Pennsylvania (PA) legalized MMJ in 2016, with the first dispensary opening its doors in 2018. The state currently recognizes 24 medical conditions for MMJ use, including six for which there is insufficient or no evidence for their efficacy as a treatment. Prior research suggests that there is a link between proximity to dispensaries and overall MMJ use. However, a gap exists in our understanding of how dispensary locations might be associated with the specific qualifying conditions for which individuals receive their certification. In response to this knowledge gap, our study delved into the medical marijuana dispensary access in PA and explored associations with both MMJ certifications and the community demographics. Utilizing data from the Pennsylvania Department of Health, we investigated how proximity to MMJ dispensaries related to the proportion of individuals certified for MMJ use within a specific area or Zip Code Tabulation Area. Additionally, we analyzed the proportion of certifications for conditions with varying levels of evidence supporting the efficacy of MMJ. This pioneering study represents the first of its kind in PA, shedding light on the association between MMJ dispensary locations and certifications. Likewise, it is the first in the US to investigate the link between dispensary locations and specific qualifying conditions. By examining these dynamics, we aim to contribute vital insights to inform policy and practice, ensuring equitable access to MMJ treatment for individuals with diverse medical needs. (more…)
AACR, Author Interviews, Biomarkers, Breast Cancer, Cancer Research / 11.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: RJ Tesi M.D. CEO and Founder of INmune Bio MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?
  • MUC4 expression by high-risk breast cancer (HER2+ or TNBC) is a biomarker that predicts resistance to therapy and an increased risk a metastasis. MUC4 expression can be determined at time of biopsy and therapeutic decisions should be adjusted to optimize the chance of response to first line therapy.
This biomarker is easily determined using immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic breast biopsy tissue similar to testing for HER2 expression. Testing for MUC4 can be easily added to the current panel of routine stains obtained at the time of the diagnostic biopsy. Knowing MUC4 status in women with high-risk breast cancer will improve results.
  • Soluble TNF causes the up regulation of immune checkpoint proteins of cells of the TME. This includes CD47 and SIRPa on tumor based macrophages and CTLA4, PD1, LAG3 and TIGIT on T cells in the TME. INB03 is a pan immune checkpoint modulator. Treatment with INB03 downregulates all immune checkpoint proteins on the cells. Downmodulation of all immune checkpoint proteins improves response to immunotherapy.
Currently, monoclonal antibodies targeting immune checkpoint proteins are a mainstay of cancer therapy and cancer drug development. These strategies target one immune checkpoint protein at a time. To date, combination therapy targeting two immune checkpoint proteins has been tried (e.g.: anti-PD1 and anti-CTLA4 combination therapy) with mixed results. Combination immune checkpoint strategies may increase therapeutic response but increase toxicity. INB03 downregulates all immune checkpoint proteins. This is equivalent to giving a patient a 6 antibody cocktail – something that cannot be done in man. As expected, decreased immune checkpoint expression improves response to therapy by converting immunotherapy resistant tumors to immunotherapy sensitive tumors.
  • In TNBC, MUC4 expression predicts both resistance to anti-PD1 therapy and increased risk of distant metastasis. Treatment with INB03 decreases expression of proteins associated with tumor metastasis, decreases the number of metastasis and improves response to anti-PD1 therapy. Early use of INB03 may prevent distal disease and improve tumor control.
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Author Interviews, Autism, Nature, Pediatrics / 11.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Andrey Vyshedskiy, PhD Founder and CEO of ImagiRation LLC Neuroscientist, Boston University MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The common intuitive belief is that language comprehension development follows a linear trajectory: children acquire one grammatical rule at a time. Over 20 years ago, Dr. A. Vyshedskiy, predicted that instead of linear development, language should unfold in three steps corresponding to three language comprehension mechanisms of increasing complexity. The study of 31845 autistic individuals, published today in the journal npj Mental Health Research, validates this prediction. The implications of this discovery are reaching far and wide. The traditional definition of language is highly ambiguous. For some philosophers, “language” is equivalent to a “communication system.” Others argue that “language” must be defined more narrowly, in a way that is unique to humans. The results of the new study streamline terminology for describing different language comprehension mechanisms. The ensuing discussion of which language comprehension mechanisms are unique to humans and which are shared with other apes is expected to be most interesting. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Prostate, Prostate Cancer, Urology, Vaccine Studies / 08.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sujit Nair, PhD Director of GU Immunotherapy Research Department of Urology Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? How is the vaccine obtained? Response: https://classic.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03262103 Dr. Tewari is the treating physician and clinical lead on the study.  This is a phase I, open-label, clinical trial (NCT03262103) using a dose escalation strategy in 12 patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer with plans for surgery. The investigational agent used in the trial is Poly-ICLC, an immune modulator developed by ONCOVIR. Poly-ICLC is a double-stranded RNA that mimics viral activity, thereby stimulating the immune response. (more…)
Author Interviews, Health Care Systems, Kidney Disease, NEJM, NIH, UT Southwestern / 04.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Miguel A. Vazquez, MD Professor of Internal Medicine University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The main reason to conduct our trial was to improve the care of patients with coexistent chronic kidney disease CKD),  type 2 diabetes and hypertension.   Patients with this triad are at high risk for multiple complications, end stage kidney disease and premature death.   There are effective interventions for these conditions.  Unfortunately, detection and awareness of CKD is low and many patients do not receive interventions that could be beneficial In our study in patients with the coexistent triad of chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension the use of an electronic algorithm to identify patients from the electronic health record and practice facilitators embedded in four large health systems to assist primary practitioners deliver evidence-based care did not lower hospitalizations when compared to usual care. (more…)
Author Interviews, Heart Disease, Technology / 03.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Janarthanan Sathananthan M.D. Chief Medical Officer for Interventional Cardiology Therapies Boston Scientific MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? boston-scientificResponse: Despite significant improvements in the drug-eluting stents that are used to treat patients with coronary artery disease, 10% of the percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) in the U.S. today address in-stent restenosis (ISR), which is when a previously stented section of a coronary artery becomes obstructed or narrowed by plaque or scar tissue. These patients require additional intervention to avoid potential complications. In the multicenter, randomized AGENT IDE trial, we evaluated whether the AGENT™ Drug-Coated Balloon (DCB), a balloon catheter coated with anti-restenotic paclitaxel, is superior to an uncoated balloon in patients for treating ISR. The AGENT DCB is currently available in countries outside the U.S. Our goal is to bring this technology to market in the U.S. and finally provide physicians with an alternative to traditional ISR treatments, such as placing additional layers of stents or radiation, which may not provide ideal outcomes in some cases. In October 2023, at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2023 meeting, we presented the primary endpoint data from our AGENT IDE randomized controlled trial evaluating clinical outcomes in patients with ISR undergoing treatment with the AGENT DCB or conventional balloon angioplasty. The positive results in this primary analysis cohort supported the device’s U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, which we announced on March 1, 2024. Just a few months later, data from the full cohort of 600 patients were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and shared in a late-breaking presentation at Cardiovascular Research Technologies (CRT) 2024 meeting.  (more…)
Author Interviews, Radiology / 02.04.2024

When a person visits a doctor, they might find tests are needed to determine the cause of problems they are experiencing. Countless tests might be used based on the symptoms the person is experiencing. However, some tests remain very common today. The following are the ones that a doctor might recommend. Biopsy One of the best health care diagnostic tests for suspicious lumps is a biopsy. During this procedure, the doctor removes one or more tissue samples from the body to examine them. They use this test to determine whether a patient has cancer, bone marrow issues, or other health issues. Colonoscopy Doctors request a colonoscopy when they suspect a patient has problems with their large intestine or rectum. They insert a flexible tube with a tiny camera in the tip into the rectum to view changes in the intestine or rectum. If they see suspicious areas, a biopsy can be taken for further testing. (more…)
Author Interviews, CDC, Infections, JAMA / 01.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Susan S. Huang, MD, MPH Chancellor's Professor, Infectious Diseases School of Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Infection Prevention University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Would you describe the decolonization techniques?  
  • This study arose from a growing concern about the increasing number and presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing colonization and infection in hospitals and long-term care. CDC has had a longstanding interest in the value of regional control of these contagious pathogens and they funded this study. The study was actually in two parts:
    • –1) Simulate various infection prevention strategies in a model and see which works best, and then
    • - 2) Do it in real life. The SHIELD project was the real-life example of our simulation finding that decolonization would work the best to prevent harm from antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
  • The regional idea is that it takes all of us working together – hospitals, nursing homes, and long-term acute care hospitals – to prevent the spread and sharing of contagious pathogens. What we can accomplish together is far greater than what any of us can do alone.
  • In this study, decolonization was the use of topical chlorhexidine antiseptic soap and povidone-iodine nasal ointments to reduce potentially harmful bacteria on the body during times when patients and residents may be at risk for infection. We swapped out bathing and showering soap with CHG in participating facilities and ensured that staff knew to clean the body well, including wounds, devices, and rashes where germs can hide and cause infection. For CHG, this involved 4% rinse off product in the shower and 2% no-rinse CHG for bed baths.
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Author Interviews, Infections / 01.04.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Maria Y. Tian, MBS Department of Medical Education Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Scranton PA MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The antibiotic crisis continues to worsen in the United States (U.S.), which has seen an increasing number of deaths associated with antibiotic resistance, becoming one of the most pressing threats to public health. Concurrently, the availability of effective antibiotics are decreasing, which increases the rates and severity of infections, particularly in patients with respiratory tract infections. Unfortunately, a persistent and pernicious contributing factor to the crisis is the unnecessary prescription of antibiotics. In a previous study, 25% of antibiotics prescribed in the outpatient setting to Medicaid beneficiaries were not associated with a provider visit [2]. Furthermore, among 298 million prescriptions filled by 53 million Medicaid patients between 2004 and 2013, 45% of the prescriptions for antibiotics were made without any clear rationale [2]. In our study, we aimed to provide an up-to-date analysis of antibiotic prescribing in the U.S. through examining the temporal profile of outpatient antibiotic use reported by Medical Expenditure Panel System (MEPS) and geographical patterns of antibiotic prescribing rates among US Medicaid program beneficiaries. This will help identify potentially unnecessary prescriptions and inform stewardship efforts. (more…)
Author Interviews, Opiods, Pain Research / 29.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jay P. Solgama Medical Student Department of Medical Education Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Scranton PA   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The opioid crisis in the United States continues to escalate, with opioid-related deaths increasing by over 800% since 2000. Prescription opioids, particularly oxycodone, have been a contributor to this crisis, with substantial variations in their distribution observed across different states [1,2,3]. Against this backdrop, the study conducted by researchers from the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine aimed to characterize the distribution of oxycodone across US states from 2000 to 2021. By analyzing data from the Drug Enforcement Administration’s comprehensive Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders System (ARCOS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-ranging ONline Data for Epidemiologic Research (WONDER) databases, the study sought to identify trends and patterns in oxycodone distribution and their potential implications for opioid-related deaths [4,5]. (more…)
Author Interviews, Breast Cancer, Radiology / 28.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Yolanda Bryce, MD Director, Interventional Radiology Residency Program Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? For whom would this treatment be indicated? Response: The standard of care for local breast cancer includes surgery, however many patients are poor surgical candidates or refuse surgery. I use cryoablation to treat this population. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Genetic Research, Nature, Rheumatology / 28.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Chelisa Cardinez PhD Postdoctoral Researcher The Burr Laboratory- Cancer Immunology and Epigenetics Genome Sciences and Cancer Division The John Curtin School of Medical Research The Australian National University Canberra, Australia   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Psoriasis is a skin inflammatory disease that affects approximately 2-3% of the population. Previous research had identified that the cytokine IL-17 drives the development of this disease. However, key questions that remained unknown about psoriasis included where did the IL-17 come from, and why do some patients with psoriasis also go on to develop systemic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis. Our research aimed to address these questions using a gain of function (GoF) mouse model that carried a genetic variant in a gene called IKBKB. (more…)
Author Interviews, Dermatology, Kidney Stones, NEJM / 28.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Thomas Robert, MD, AIX Associate Professor of Nephrology APHM (Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Marseille) Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France   Prof. Emmanuel Letavernier, MD PhD Nephrologist at Tenon Hospital Paris, France MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Our work was prompted by emerging concerns surrounding the potential nephrotoxic effects of hair-straightening products containing glyoxylic acid. This inquiry was instigated by a patient who experienced three repeated acute episodes of kidney injury in June 2020, April 2021, and July 2022, each occurring shortly after a hair-straightening procedure. Notably, these episodes resolved with hydration. Upon examining the composition of the hair product used by the patient, which contained glyoxylic acid, and considering the patient's report of  painful ulcer scalp during application and subsequent scalp scarring, we suspected a potential link between exposure to glyoxylic acid and kidney injury. Consulting with my colleague, Professor Emmanuel Letavenier, a specialist in crystalline nephropathy at Paris, confirmed this suspicion. In summer 2023, cases series have been reported by an Israeli team (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36610611/), who described 26 patients presenting with acute renal injuries after hair straightening treatments. Biopsies revealed calcium oxalate crystals in the kidneys. The Israeli researchers suspected an effect of formaldehyde and glycolic acid, another substance found in many cosmetic products, including hair straightening products, but were unable to provide conclusive evidence. (more…)
Author Interviews, OBGYNE / 26.03.2024

Pelvic health is an underappreciated component of overall health. Many people suspect that only doctors can help with pelvic issues such as incontinence, painful intercourse or constipation. Physical therapy Gilbert AZ for the pelvis can address many of these issues and provide relief in tandem with medical therapies. Pelvic floor physical therapy is very common and can drastically improve patients' quality of life. (more…)
Author Interviews, JAMA, Pediatrics, USPSTF / 26.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: James Stevermer, M.D., M.S.P.H. Vice chair for clinical affairs Professor of family and community medicine University of Missouri Medical director of MU Health Care Family Medicine–Callaway Physicians, Dr. Stevermer joined the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force in January 2021. MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Child abuse and neglect is a serious problem that affects too many kids and teens across the United States. This type of maltreatment can have a profound effect on their health, development, and well-being, both when they are young and into adulthood. (more…)
Alzheimer's - Dementia, Author Interviews, JAMA, UC Davis / 25.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Charles DeCarli, MD, FAAN, FAHA Victor and Genevieve Orsi Chair in Alzheimer's Research Distinguished Professor of Neurology Director, Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and Imaging of Dementia and Aging (IDeA) Laboratory Department of Neurology and Center for Neuroscience University of California at Davis Sacramento, CA  95817   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The overall health of the U.S. population has improved dramatically over the last 100 years, Individuals are also living longer resulting in an increasing percentage of the population at risk for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD).  Recent data from the Framingham Heart study, however, finds that dementia incidence may be declining.  While many factors such as greater educational achievement and medical management of vascular risk factors may explain part of this effect, early life environmental differences also likely contribute. (more…)
Accidents & Violence, Author Interviews, Environmental Risks / 25.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Donald ARedelmeierMD, MS(HSR); Canada Research Chair Medical Decision Sciences Professor of Medicine University of Toronto MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The arrival of a solar eclipse attracts substantial public attention and superstitions about supernatural forces. We wondered whether the risk of solar retinopathy might not be the only health hazard since the celestial event leads to increases in driving and potentially increases in traffic deaths. (more…)
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Prostate Cancer, Radiology / 25.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Steven S. Raman, M.D., FASR, FSIR Professor of Radiology, Urology and Surgery David Geffen School of Medicine UCLA MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Would you describe the TULSA technique? Response: Prostate cancer is the most common solid organ cancer in men.  Currently whole gland ablation relies on surgery or radiation both of which have high rates of impotence and incontinence but also have up to a 30% rate of post therapy recurrence. TULSA is a new minimally invasive technique to treat PCa under MRI guidance with both near continuous whole gland MRI imaging and MRI thermometry to make sure the extent of lethal heating over 55 degrees Celsius is known.  (more…)
Addiction, Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Cannabis / 23.03.2024

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Brian J. Piper, PhD Associate Professor of Neuroscience Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine Scranton PA 18411 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Many cancer patients use marijuana to treat pain, nausea, or anxiety, often without communicating this with their health care providers. Two observational studies (1, 2) from a single institution in Israel purporting to find a dangerous drug interaction between medical cannabis and immunotherapy have been cited hundreds of times, including by clinical practice guidelines. The cannabinoid CB2 receptor is found on immune tissues so it is biologically possible that marijuana could make immunotherapies like nivolumab less effective. However, there were anonymous reports on PubPeer (3-5) of many irregularities in the data-analysis. If there were unappreciated differences on other important variables at baseline besides subsequent cannabis use, this could change the interpretation of these influential reports (1, 2). This investigation involved attempting to repeat and verify the data-analysis. (more…)