Phase 3 Darzalex Trial Demonstrated Meaningful Improvement in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
janseen-oncologyMaria-Victoria Mateos, MD, PhD

University Hospital of Salamanca/IBSAL
Salamanca, Spain

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The Phase 3 ALCYONE study data showed DARZALEX (daratumumab) in combination with bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisone (VMP) significantly improved clinical outcomes, including reducing the risk of disease progression or death by 50 percent, in newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) at a median follow-up of 16.5 months (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 0.50; 95 percent CI [0.38-0.65], p<0.0001).

The median progression-free survival (PFS) for DARZALEX-VMP had not yet been reached, compared to an estimated median PFS of 18.1 months for patients who received VMP alone. In addition to reducing the risk of disease progression or death, DARZALEX significantly improved the overall response rate (ORR) as compared to VMP alone, including more than doubling rates of stringent complete response, significantly improved rates of very good partial response or better and complete response or better (CR).

The most common (≥10 percent) Grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) for DARZALEX-VMP vs. VMP were neutropenia (40 percent vs. 39 percent), thrombocytopenia (34 percent vs. 38 percent), anemia (16 percent vs. 20 percent) and pneumonia (11 percent vs. 4 percent). One patient in each arm discontinued treatment due to pneumonia, and 0.9 percent of patients discontinued DARZALEX due to an infection. Twenty-eight percent of patients experienced infusion reactions (IRs) due to DARZALEX.. In the DARZALEX-VMP arm, 42 percent of patients experienced a serious adverse event (SAE), compared to 33 percent in the VMP arm.

The study findings were as a late-breaking abstract (Abstract #LBA-4) at the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in Atlanta, and simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

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Breakthrough Treatment With Prometic’s IV Plasminogen Treats Rare Disabling Disorder

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Charles T. Nakar, MD

Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center Pediatrics
Indianapolis, IN  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Congenital plasminogen deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that is caused by mutations in the PLG gene. Mutations in this gene lead to clinical manifestations such as fibrinous deposits on mucous membranes leading to disruption of tissue or organ function. These symptoms, when untreated, lead to significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. Life-threatening episodes may occur especially when the respiratory system is affected. There is currently no established approach to treatment of type 1 plasminogen deficiency and the available topical and systemic therapies (e.g. FFP, corticosteroids, immunomodulatory drugs, anticoagulants, amongst others) lack consistent efficacy. Patients may undergo multiple surgeries to remove lesions, but this approach typically leads to regrowth of lesions. Prometic’s intravenous plasminogen replacement therapy represents the first direct treatment for this serious disorder.

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Multiple Myeloma: Phase 3 Study of DARZALEX + VMP Reduced Risk of Disease Progression and Mortality

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Meletios A. Dimopoulos MD Professor and Chairman Department of Clinical Therapeutics University Athens School of Medicine Athens, Greece

Dr. Dimopoulos

DrMeletios A. Dimopoulos MD
Professor and Chairman
Department of Clinical Therapeutics
University Athens School of Medicine
Athens, Greece

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Updated data from the Phase 3 POLLUX trials showed DARZALEX, in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 56 percent, compared to lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone (Hazard Ratio [HR]=0.44; 95 percent CI [0.34-0.55], p<0.0001). After a median follow-up of 32.9 months, the median progression-free survival (PFS) in the DARZALEX arm has not been reached, compared with a median PFS of 17.5 months for patients who received lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone.

DARZALEX in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone also significantly increased the overall response rate (ORR) compared to lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone (93 percent vs. 76 percent, p<0.0001), including rates of complete response (CR) or better (55 percent vs. 23 percent, p<0.0001). DARZALEX also showed significantly higher (>3-fold) MRD-negative rates compared to lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone. These data were featured as an oral presentation (Abstract #739) at the 59th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting in early December.

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Daratumumab Monotherapy for Patients with Intermediate or High-Risk Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Craig C. Hofmeister, MD, MPH The Ohio State University 

Dr. Hofmeister

Craig CHofmeisterMD, MPH
The Ohio State University 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Preliminary data presented from the randomized, open-label, Phase 2 CENTAURUS (SMM2001) study evaluated three dosing schedules for DARZALEX monotherapy in patients with intermediate or high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma. A total of 123 patients were enrolled, with a median time since initial smoldering multiple myeloma diagnosis of 6.83 months (0.4-56). Patients were randomized to one of three treatment arms receiving DARZALEX 16 mg/kg intravenously in 8-week cycles: 1.) a long-intense dosing schedule (LONG) where DARZALEX was administered weekly in Cycle 1, every other week in Cycle 2-3, every 4 weeks in Cycle 4-7, and every 8 weeks up to Cycle 20; 2.) an intermediate dosing schedule (INT), where DARZALEX was given weekly for 1 cycle, and every 8 weeks up to Cycle 20 and; 3.) a short intense dosing schedule (SHORT), where DARZALEX was given weekly for 1 cycle. Results from the study showed DARZALEX monotherapy had a tolerable safety profile in patients with intermediate or high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma, with the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) being fatigue, cough, headache and insomnia. The efficacy endpoints included overall response rate, progression free survival, time to next treatment, and overall survival rate at 4 years. These study results serve as the basis for a Phase 3 study for DARZALEX in smoldering multiple myeloma, which is actively enrolling. These findings demonstrated DARZALEX had a manageable safety profile in patients with intermediate or high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma.

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