Pediatrics / 22.02.2021

Being a parent comes with a lot of challenges, but no matter what, you do everything you can to make sure your child is happy and healthy. You can’t control everything, whether it's your kid not getting on with another child in their class which makes them upset, or as they transition into their teenage years and decide to rebel against you. These are fairly normal experiences for parents, but there are other circumstances you might have to face that are more complicated and harder to navigate. If your child is diagnosed with a condition like cerebral palsy, it can be overwhelming. While your child can still have a perfectly happy and healthy life, they will have more challenges to overcome than a child who does not have the condition. If your child has recently been diagnosed, below are some tips on how you can support them as a parent.

Keep Them Active

Cerebral palsy affects a person’s mobility, coordination, and sometimes it can also impact their speech. Your child will have to take part in regular physical therapy sessions to keep their muscles strong and healthy, but this can be uncomfortable or painful at times, which can put them off taking part in these exercises. While this might be difficult to witness as a parent, you must encourage your child to continue with their therapy both during their sessions with a physiotherapist and at home with you. You should also encourage them to take part in activities they enjoy recreationally and to get them out of the house as much as possible. (more…)
Alcohol, Author Interviews, Pediatrics / 13.09.2013

Svetlana Popova, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. Senior Scientist, Social and Epidemiological Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Assistant Professor, Epidemiology Division Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto Assistant Professor, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto Graduate Faculty Associate Member, Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto CAMH, 33 Russell Street, Room # T507 Toronto Ontario, Canada M5S 2S1MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Svetlana Popova, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D. Senior Scientist, Social and Epidemiological Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Assistant Professor, Epidemiology Division Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto Assistant Professor, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto Graduate Faculty Associate Member, Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto CAMH, 33 Russell Street, Room # T507 Toronto Ontario, Canada M5S 2S1 MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Popova: We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of internationally published and unpublished studies that reported the prevalence of FAS and/or FASD in all types of child care systems (e.g., orphanage, foster care, boarding school, adoption centre, or child welfare system). The primary objective was to estimate a pooled (combined) prevalence for FAS and FASD in various child care systems using data from existing studies that used an Active Case Ascertainment method (when researchers/clinicians actively seek and diagnose FASD cases). The available data was analyzed by using a standard statistical technique (called meta-analysis). This study revealed that the vast majority of existing studies report that the prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) in the various child-care settings in the different countries is extremely high. Our analysis of these studies demonstrated that the pooled prevalence of FAS in child care settings (6%) was found to be approximately 9-30 times higher than the prevalence of FAS in the general population of North America, which is reported to range from 2 to 7 cases per 1,000 individuals in the USA and 1 per 1,000 in Canada. Thus, children in care represent a high-risk population for FASD. (more…)