Toxins In Vapor From Electronic Cigarettes Can Travel Far

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Uploaded by Merak MareyJonathan Thornburg, PhD
Director, Exposure and Aerosol Technology
RTI International
Research Triangle Park, NC

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Thornburg: RTI wants to improve the human condition by protecting public health from exposure to contaminants. That includes secondhand exposure to electronic cigarette vapors. RTI realized that most research has focused on the electronic cigarette user, not on secondhand exposure. Our research created a simulated lung in our laboratory to produce representative electronic cigarette aerosol that a user would exhale so we could measure the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition. Those two parameters are critical characteristics for understanding the physical and chemical properties of the aerosol as it disperses in the environment to produce the airborne concentrations that determine someone’s secondhand exposure. Our main findings were:

  1. The aerosol particles exhaled by a user are smaller than 1000 nm, with median size between 100 and 200 nm. The aerosol size distribution varies with the type of e-liquid used.
  2. The aerosol is made of water, glycerin/propylene glycol, nicotine, artificial flavors, and preservatives
  3. Artificial flavors identified were ethyl maltol, 2-methyl naphthalene and 2-tert-butyl-p-cresol present.
  4. BHA and BHT preservatives were present.
  5. Dosimetry modeling determined that more than 50% of the electronic cigarette emissions were exhaled by the user, potentially leading to secondhand exposure.

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Smoking Cessation and Electronic Cigarettes

Dr. Chris Bullen MBChB MPH PhD FAFPM FNZCPHM Director School of Population Health, The University of Auckland Private Bag 92019 Auckland 1142, New Zealand Co-Director of the NZ Tobacco Control Research Turanga: A national programme of research to inform rapid smoking prevalence reduction.MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Chris Bullen MBChB MPH PhD FAFPM FNZCPHM
Director
School of Population Health, The University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019 Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Co-Director of the NZ Tobacco Control Research Turanga: A national programme of research to inform rapid smoking prevalence reduction.
Web: http://www.turanga.org.nz/

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Bullen:

  • E-cigarettes, with or without nicotine, were modestly effective at helping smokers to quit, with similar levels of abstinence as with nicotine patches, and few adverse events.
  • ?At 6 months, verified abstinence was 7·3% with nicotine e-cigarettes, 5·8% with patches, and 4·1% with placebo e-cigarettes. However, there was insufficient statistical power to conclude superiority of nicotine e-cigarettes to patches or to placebo e-cigarettes.
  • No significant differences in rates of adverse events occurrence were found between the groups.
  • E-cigarettes, like the vapes found at MagicVaporizers, were very popular throughout the trial, with almost 90% of users stating they would recommend them to a friend trying to quit smoking.

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